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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just setup a new 20g high and it's going alone nicely, except my 3 Panda Corys that I added after 8 days of cycling, aren't eating :/ I've tried feeing them algae pellets, and these other pellets with krill and other stuff in them but they just won't eat.

Any advice is greatly appreciated

Thanks
--Mara
 

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Are you sure your tank is cycled? What are your ammonia and nitrite levels? If the tank is not fully cycled, it's almost for sure that the pandas are not eating because they are stressed from being poisoned and dying in your tank. If that were the case, then you should take action by doing large, daily water changes with Prime or other ammonia/nitrite detoxifiers until the tank has finished cycling. They may all die anyway, but that would give them the best shot.
 

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Panda's are fairly sensitive fish and they get stressed out pretty easily. That being said, cory's are not dynamic eaters.
Not sure what you're saying with this. But the Pandas I've had over the years are pigs. They get super excited when food hits the water and don't stop cruising the substrate until they've gotten every last bit.

My opinion - your Pandas are probably suffering from stress of incomplete cycle, and Pandas are not (generally) a fish that can "cycle a tank" for you. If it's possible, you should take them back to wherever you purchased them and try again after your tank is cycled.

Meanwhile, I hope you're removing whatever is going uneaten, otherwise you're making things worse. Feed sparingly; remove the uneaten parts. And try something like frozen bloodworms, but sparingly. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Are you sure your tank is cycled? What are your ammonia and nitrite levels? If the tank is not fully cycled, it's almost for sure that the pandas are not eating because they are stressed from being poisoned and dying in your tank. If that were the case, then you should take action by doing large, daily water changes with Prime or other ammonia/nitrite detoxifiers until the tank has finished cycling. They may all die anyway, but that would give them the best shot.
the water test I got done at the LFS said there was a bit of nitrite, last week there was ammonia, but i guess it cleared up

and i think id be stressful for the corys to take them back, they dont look to ad in my tank right now,

and for anyone who wants to yell at me, yeah i made a mistake, i know that
 

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Panda's for me have been the most sensitive and hardest to keep of the cories I've kept.

Putting them into a healthy system can't be more stressful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Looked into what?? You mean you didn't know that you set the tank up 8 days before you started noticing issues with the Pandas?
there`s loads of false information on the web, and iIthought a week was plenty before putting in some fish
 

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If you can't buy water testing kits, I would keep taking water samples to your fish store to make sure to find out when your tank is cycled.

When cycling a tank, you first will see a spike in ammonia, then once the bacteria that uses that gets established, you will see a spike in nitrite. Both are harmful to fish. Now that you are not seeing ammonia, after a week or so, you should see a 0 reading with nitrite, and the nitrate level should start to rise. Nitrate doesn't become a problem until it reaches very high levels. Once you have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite and a low nitrate reading, your tank is cycled.

You should monitor the level of the nitrite now, and do water changes to keep it low. Keep in mind that even a 50% water change only reduces the nitrite level by 1/2.

Many people make mistakes when first getting into fishkeeping. Don't be too hard on yourself. You did come to this forum seeking advice, so you are trying your best to do the right thing for your fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
If you can't buy water testing kits, I would keep taking water samples to your fish store to make sure to find out when your tank is cycled.

When cycling a tank, you first will see a spike in ammonia, then once the bacteria that uses that gets established, you will see a spike in nitrite. Both are harmful to fish. Now that you are not seeing ammonia, after a week or so, you should see a 0 reading with nitrite, and the nitrate level should start to rise. Nitrate doesn't become a problem until it reaches very high levels. Once you have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite and a low nitrate reading, your tank is cycled.

You should monitor the level of the nitrite now, and do water changes to keep it low. Keep in mind that even a 50% water change only reduces the nitrite level by 1/2.

Many people make mistakes when first getting into fishkeeping. Don't be too hard on yourself. You did come to this forum seeking advice, so you are trying your best to do the right thing for your fish.
Thank you very much, Ill do a big water change now, and i have a bottle of stuff that's supposed to make the cycling go faster or s/t,

Now i just have to hope my corys make it through this week
 
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