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Ok reviving this thread with another question. Say I go through with this but then down the road want to raise the water level. Could I use the outflow hole to feed a canister filter? If it did and the canister filter failed I am guessing that would cause a flooded floor.
Not sure exactly what "this" is given that you were asking about various things in the thread. But if the general question is can you go from a bulkhead to a canister, then yes. I have that on a formerly marine tank that I'm now using for freshwater. You'll need to come up with the various ABS/PVC parts and you'll have to Frankenstein things together to do whatever it is that you want to do but certainly possible. Or you can just plug the hole in various ways and use the normal canister fittings. The canister is sealed so it can "fail" in various ways without flooding (i.e., you can turn off power no problem, etc.). If the seal or a hose fails, then you could have water. That would be the case with a canister even without the bulkhead or with a sump too depending on how it fails. But catastrophic failure would be rare. More likely is slower leak from a bad seal/leaking fitting.
 

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So I guess the main issue would be that if I raise the water level it would be way above bulkhead for the outflow. If I rigged the bulkhead up to a canister and it somehow failed, the fact the bulk head would be lets say 10" below the waterline that 10" of water would end up on the floor due to gravity.

I would imagine that using a canister filter in a more traditional way (not using a bulk head and having the outflow tube coming over the top of the aquarium) if a failure occurred it would break the siphon effect and could not suck the water into the canister to leak out.

Does that make sense?
The typical "hook" for a canister won't break the siphon. Think about it... You can loop some hose over the edge of the tank and you'll pull siphon just fine as long as the canister is below the intake.

I think what I'd worry more about is potential leaking from the bulkhead/plumbing. Most are done more near the waterline so not as much water to lose (assuming same volume anyway).
 

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No I get the concept of a siphon but if there is a leak in the siphon I would imagine the filter would not function. Like if there is a hook (never heard that term till now) and you disconnected the hose you would leak the water that was currently in the hose and that's it. But in my case you would lose all the water in the tank above the bulkhead.

I guess what I am asking is would this be too risky. I realize it probably would never happen but what if it did.
I suppose it depends on exactly how and where things fail. But, for example, if I pull the intake at the canister without using whatever cut-off there may be, the siphon will not be broken. The hose will be full of water and assuming that the end is lower than the intake, it will continue to drain just as if I'd started a siphon with the hose. The shape of the "hook" isn't to break siphon, but rather just to fit over the edge of the tank (as the outflow also is formed just typically shorter).

Yes, there is some potential risk and being lower (at least in some sense and some potential cases) increases some potential modes of failure and the amount of water that could be lost in some cases. Whether that's greater or less than some other alternative depends on specifics of how things might fail.
 
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