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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am just about to set up my Do!Aqua 12" cube and would like to include a small CO2 system. I work at a paintball store and have been doing it for 15+ years. I have a system that I think would work but would like to go over it with the experts.

I am missing a couple connections but those will be in place.

I will have an adapter to the silver piece. The silver piece then goes to a regulator 0-200 PSI. Then the output will be connected to a piece that can taken off and hooked to a Ideal Needle valve. Then to a check valve and to a diffuser.



My main question is the PSI I should run to the needle valve. 10-30 PSI and then let the needle valve do the rest?

Thanks in advance!

-Dave
 

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I think 10-30psi is a little low because i have a similar setup minus the reg. My tank is connected to the needle valve via the ASA valve (you probably know what that is seeing you work in a paintball shop) and to a hose that leads to check valve and diffuser. On the ASA valve output it between 800-1000psi and it bubbles normally depending how much i twerk with the needle valve.

just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The output from the CO2 will be 800PSI. I was wondering what PSI needs to be going to the needle valve. From what I have heard is its a pain to adjust and I know this from working on paintball guns ;)

Thanks for the input. How do you like yours.

-Dave
 

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Needle valves do not adjust pressure, just "flow". There is a difference.

I would set it to 30 psi and see how it works for you. You may have to adjust from there.

I am not sure that that regulator will deliver a consistent pressure start to finish. Only one way to find out.
 

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It's going to depend partly on what your diffuser needs. I run mine at ~40PSI because my diffuser needs a minimum of 30PSI. My system seems to be similar to what you're aiming at.

As far as adjusting the needle valves go, the cheaper the valve, the harder it is to adjust accurately, and the more it needs fiddlin' with, so I suggest you consider springing for a decent needle valve. :smile:
 
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