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I have had good results with San Francisco Bay's "seaweed salad" . I have offered it and it was well received by livebearer fry,juvenile bristlenose,oto's,and once raised some discus that would rip it from the vege -clip stuck to the tank.
Can find much cheaper version of it from Asian food Isle at Walmart in the form of Sushi Nori dried seaweed.
Comes in small plastic Ziploc type bag with approx. 200 sheets of the stuff for maybe three bucks.
But then I would eat it all myself (Burp*) :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
look at the ingredients on the algae wafers, almost all those on the market are made mostly from fish meal, not algae. There are better quality wafers and foods entering the market that are more appropriate (Paradigm is a company that is making some great new foods for herbivores and omnivores).
I got Top Fin Algae Thins with spirulina algae and protein. It has algae meal as well as fish meal. Do you have a recommended brand or is this good?

I have had good results with San Francisco Bay's "seaweed salad" . I have offered it and it was well received by livebearer fry,juvenile bristlenose,oto's,and once raised some discus that would rip it from the vege -clip stuck to the tank.
Can find much cheaper version of it from Asian food Isle at Walmart in the form of Sushi Nori dried seaweed.
Comes in small plastic Ziploc type bag with approx. 200 sheets of the stuff for maybe three bucks.
So...any type of seaweed works? o_O
 

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Most Otos die and don't make it because they are not properly fed. In fact, most people don't know how to balance out their diet. They are easy to keep when you feed them well. Otos should be having a fat belly. If they are skinny from their belly, it means they have not been fed well. Most of their diet consists of algae; however, you can supplement this by feeding them algae waffers. You can also feed them spinach or zucchini, but you have to put it in the microwave and blend it in a bit. Just make sure that you let the vegetable cool down a bit. I feed my 2 Otos on my 10 gallon fish tank zucchini every 2 days or so. Their bellies are fat.
I agree with this. Starvation is the most common cause of death for Oto's. The moment you added the third Oto, the very limited food available just became even more limited. So it appears that 2 is the current maximum for your tank. They rarely eat algae wafers but will eat fruits (blueberries, grapes) and zucchini slices.
 

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I agree with this. Starvation is the most common cause of death for Oto's. The moment you added the third Oto, the very limited food available just became even more limited. So it appears that 2 is the current maximum for your tank. They rarely eat algae wafers but will eat fruits (blueberries, grapes) and zucchini slices.
I would disagree with the alga wafer statement. Mine always have in any of my tanks.
 

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I have a air pump yes, with the tubing but no control to it, and its 6.6 gallons.
There's a quick and dirty method for drip acclimation:

Get a bucket, a tub that fits inside the picket and a plastic sandwich bag.
Put the fish and the pet shop water in the tub and place in the bucket, then fill the sandwich bag with tank water.
Tie the bag to the bucket's handle, so it hangs over the tub and pop a tiny hole in the bag so it drips slowly into the tub.
Once the bag is mostly empty, hey presto! Drip acclimated fish, no siphon, or valves required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I agree with this. Starvation is the most common cause of death for Oto's. The moment you added the third Oto, the very limited food available just became even more limited. So it appears that 2 is the current maximum for your tank. They rarely eat algae wafers but will eat fruits (blueberries, grapes) and zucchini slices.
Food was not a problem, I had a diatom bloom along with algae waefers which are now being eaten. They disappear and the otos I have now are belly bump galoree.

I would disagree with the alga wafer statement. Mine always have in any of my tanks.
Mine have started.

There's a quick and dirty method for drip acclimation:

Get a bucket, a tub that fits inside the picket and a plastic sandwich bag.
Put the fish and the pet shop water in the tub and place in the bucket, then fill the sandwich bag with tank water.
Tie the bag to the bucket's handle, so it hangs over the tub and pop a tiny hole in the bag so it drips slowly into the tub.
Once the bag is mostly empty, hey presto! Drip acclimated fish, no siphon, or valves required.
Sounds like I'll give it a shot! Sounds GODLIKE! How long would you suggest acclimation
 

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About an hour! Or as long as it takes a small drip to replace the water in the tub. The tub overflows, generally, hence the bucket.
I let my guppies and RCS have two hours, because the room was nice and warm; didn't have to worry about them cooling off at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
About an hour! Or as long as it takes a small drip to replace the water in the tub. The tub overflows, generally, hence the bucket.
I let my guppies and RCS have two hours, because the room was nice and warm; didn't have to worry about them cooling off at all.
I thought fish can't live in a bag for more than an hour aha, thought it was a general rule.
 

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There is a trade off, between how gradual the acclimation is, and the build up of ammonia and CO2, and depletion of oxygen in the bag water.

But, bear in mind that fish can be transported overnight by courier! I live an hour's drive from the nearest fish store, so I get a lot of things delivered, and did a lot of research into how ethical that is, how safe. It turns out that a calm fish with a large air pocket in its bag can live in aprox. 500ml of water without the ammonia building up to harmful levels for about 12 hours, maybe more. I didn't test it, for obvious reasons.

The drip acclimation process provides a steady stream of ammonia and nitrIte free, highly oxygenated water, too, making the transition much easier on the new fish even if they're coming from pretty poor water quality.

Look out for diseases though! I've just had a battle with callamanus worms, and the war isn't over yet. If you have the capacity, quarantine new fish for a month so you can observe their condition for diseases that might hurt the rest of your stock. If you cant quarantine, have a few medications on hand for treating the big three: bacteria, fungus's and parasites.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
There is a trade off, between how gradual the acclimation is, and the build up of ammonia and CO2, and depletion of oxygen in the bag water.

But, bear in mind that fish can be transported overnight by courier! I live an hour's drive from the nearest fish store, so I get a lot of things delivered, and did a lot of research into how ethical that is, how safe. It turns out that a calm fish with a large air pocket in its bag can live in aprox. 500ml of water without the ammonia building up to harmful levels for about 12 hours, maybe more. I didn't test it, for obvious reasons.

The drip acclimation process provides a steady stream of ammonia and nitrIte free, highly oxygenated water, too, making the transition much easier on the new fish even if they're coming from pretty poor water quality.

Look out for diseases though! I've just had a battle with callamanus worms, and the war isn't over yet. If you have the capacity, quarantine new fish for a month so you can observe their condition for diseases that might hurt the rest of your stock. If you cant quarantine, have a few medications on hand for treating the big three: bacteria, fungus's and parasites.
Got bacteria prevention always with some IAL. I do not have a quarantine thank however I am converting my unused 10 gal to a plant grower tank once my apple snails die off.
 

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SODS.
Sudden Otto death syndrome.
There might not be any rhyme or reason they die off so quickly. I have purchased probably 20 in the past few years and quite a few passed within the first few days for NO reason.
I brought home 5 from a reputable mom/pop store and 2 died within 2 days and the others began laying eggs that quickly hatched giving me at least 20 fry.
I still have the last 3 and a few fry survived to adulthood surprisingly considering my tank is not baby friendly and i never moved them to a fry basket.
If they survive the week then they will be around for a while. Thats often why they are only $1.00 at petsmart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Aha, they're $1 and change with membership, without you're looking at $3 inflation of the :fish1: but anyways, yeah I researched about them and the general reason is stress or being wild caught.
 
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