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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, I read that manzanita grows all over Western Oregon (i live in Salem), and I want to go collect a bunch of branches. The problem is, I am having a lot of trouble finding information on where to look. And all the information I do see is like 10 years old.
If someone can help me out, I would greatly appreciate it (and I wouldn't be against sharing my spoils). I am not asking for specific locations - although that would be IMMENSELY helpful- I just want to know what areas would be good to start. How would I tell that an area would be good to stop by? Any nature things that suggest that manzanita grows there? Any trails? I read on a different thread that a gentleman had luck at Chip Ross Park, but that was like 10+ years ago.

Any help would be appreciated. Thank you guys
 

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Arctostaphylos columbiana, for example, is hardy enough to be used for highway landscaping in western Oregon and Washington. Arctostaphylos 'Emerald Carpet', A. uva-ursi (the Bearberry), and other low-growing manzanitas are extremely valuable evergreen groundcovers for dry slopes. Larger varieties, such as Arctostaphylos. 'Dr. Hurd,' can be grown as individual specimens, and pruned to emphasize the striking pattern and colors of the branches. They prefer light, well-drained soil, although the low-growing ground covers will tolerate heavier soils.

So perhaps look for them on southern facing slopes, with sandier soils? Good luck and tell us how you do

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Arctostaphylos columbiana, for example, is hardy enough to be used for highway landscaping in western Oregon and Washington. Arctostaphylos 'Emerald Carpet', A. uva-ursi (the Bearberry), and other low-growing manzanitas are extremely valuable evergreen groundcovers for dry slopes. Larger varieties, such as Arctostaphylos. 'Dr. Hurd,' can be grown as individual specimens, and pruned to emphasize the striking pattern and colors of the branches. They prefer light, well-drained soil, although the low-growing ground covers will tolerate heavier soils.

So perhaps look for them on southern facing slopes, with sandier soils? Good luck and tell us how you do

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Southern Facing Slopes with sandier soils. Ok, thank you for all the information. Fascinating. I will definitely post an update when I go.
 

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So I originally was going to go on a roundabout trip down to Coos Bay and Roseburg, but then decided last minite to go to central Oregon. This is what I found just outside of Sisters.

Hold on, I don't see a button for attaching photos or files

Ha, got it. Well, here are the photos


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