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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've seen mentions about nutrient absorbing fast growers aiding in the prevention of algae when starting. Or maybe I'm confused about this strategy ?

How do I know if I would need this. And for how long ? What is a scenario this strategy is used in ? What non-floating plants do you recommended ?

I would appreciate any tips regarding this. Thank you :D
 

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I've seen mentions about nutrient absorbing fast growers aiding in the prevention of algae when starting. Or maybe I'm confused about this strategy ?

How do I know if I would need this. And for how long ? What is a scenario this strategy is used in ? What non-floating plants do you recommended ?

I would appreciate any tips regarding this. Thank you :D
Hi jonathan,

Also the Ceratopteris (watersprite) species will suck up excess ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates like a sponge. Typically when I am cycling a new tank it is the ammonia portion of the nitrogen cycle that causes me to have issues with algae, especially hair algae.

Ceratopteris and Aponogeton on right side of 45 gallon
 

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Carpe Diem
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+1 ^^

Plants from Hygrophila, Limnophila, and Rotala families work great also. I try to add as many different species of plants as I can get my hands on.
 

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How long do you do this ? At what point can I remove these plants ? For example if you were doing a stemless style design ?
Hi jonathan,

With a new tank I monitor the ammonia, nitrites, and nitrate levels until they all reach zero ("0"); typically this takes 3-4 weeks. If you don't have test kits a good LFS will usually test your water and let you know when the nitrogen cycle is done. A lot of these plants look good in a tank whether you are going through the nitrogen cycle or not.
 

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+1 ^^

Plants from Hygrophila, Limnophila, and Rotala families work great also. I try to add as many different species of plants as I can get my hands on.
+2

water sprite and wisteria, anacharis also serve its purpose. Mosses are slow growers in general and would not be reliant upon to soak up any excess to really make a difference. frogbit and dwarf water lettuce are fantastic plants where red root floaters and duckweed dont make as much an impact.
 

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I have been using wisteria (Hygrophilia difformis) loosely attached to the driftwood since I began this tank in June to soak up light and nutrients until the rooted plants grow up some more. I am beginning to like the balance it provides visually; this may change when the swords grow up near the surface but for now it has really helped keep various algaes under control. No ferts other than fish food....

 

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Invert Warrior
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Lets not forget how nice certain floaters can look. Dwarf water lettuce, salvinia minima, duckweed all have their moments in addition to their cleaning qualities.


MABJ's iDevice used for this message :p
 

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Set up the aquarium so it includes plenty of the faster growing plants. Include the slower growing plants where they will fit.
When the cycle is complete gradually remove the faster growing ones and add more of the slower growing plants. Do not do it all at once. I would work out the changes in perhaps 4-6 sessions a week or so apart.
If at any time the ammonia or nitrite start showing then stop making those changes until these go back to 0 and do water changes to keep the livestock healthy.
 

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I have been using wisteria (Hygrophilia difformis) loosely attached to the driftwood since I began this tank in June to soak up light and nutrients until the rooted plants grow up some more. I am beginning to like the balance it provides visually; this may change when the swords grow up near the surface but for now it has really helped keep various algaes under control. No ferts other than fish food....

Beautiful tank!
 

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So my newish tank has a lot of Wisteria and I believe it is doing a fine job. As long as I continue to like it aesthetically, is there a reason to remove it because it is sucking up TOO MANY nutrients?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So my newish tank has a lot of Wisteria and I believe it is doing a fine job. As long as I continue to like it aesthetically, is there a reason to remove it because it is sucking up TOO MANY nutrients?

Good question ! Can super nutrient absorbing plants out compete everything else ??

And thank you everyone for the valuable advise.
 

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Good question ! Can super nutrient absorbing plants out compete everything else ??

And thank you everyone for the valuable advise.
Hi jonathan,

Good question; one that I don't recall seeing asked in the past. I would say yes, just like in nature some plants are more suited to an environment and will out-compete other plants for nutrients and real estate.

Speaking from personal experience, there are certainly some species that out-perform others species in my tanks - and it isn't always the same species. In one tank my Nymphoides sp 'Taiwan' does well and in another is it Limnophila aromatica. I assume this is the result of variances in lighting levels and possibly available nutrients.
 

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I never ask what is your substrate? I don't think there are substrate that release big amount of nutrients in the beginning. Most substrate design to hold as much nutrients they can. And the only nutrient that leech out of good substrates are ammonia which can be controlled by 50% daily water change for the first week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I never ask what is your substrate? I don't think there are substrate that release big amount of nutrients in the beginning. Most substrate design to hold as much nutrients they can. And the only nutrient that leech out of good substrates are ammonia which can be controlled by 50% daily water change for the first week.

I'm using fluval stratum which I still cant decide if was a heart breaking mistake. I dint know about ADA products at the time. It was what my LFS suggested. They mostly specialize in planted tanks, so I trusted them.

Now my debate is if aquasoil is truly better nutrition wise. The product descriptions are very nearly identical. Only ADA power sand seems to claim something about nutrients -- But I don't have power sand available to me except possibly by mail. Also , I dont know if I have the financial ability to change. (I realise that seems to be a layer underneath aquasoil)
 
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