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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all!

I've asked for stocking ideas on here before, but didn't want to Revive an old thread.

I have a 40g breeder that is decently planted with mostly stems, and a decent amount of rooters. Maybe 50+ rooters and stems all together. It was recently planted, so it will take some time to fill in.

Right now I have 9 honey gouramis in the tank alone with a few nerites. I LOVE the personality of these guys in a larger shoal. They are really confident and stress free for normally being considered a shy species.

I want to stock up a bit more, and have plenty of room, but don't want to have the tank too appear too "crowded" changing the behavior of the enhabitants.

Here is what I was thinking:

-9 honey gouramis (really don't want their personalities to change if I add more species. I want them to stay as confident as they are now)
-20 pearl celestial danios
-20 pygmy corydoras

Aquadvisor has me below 80% with a 2217 and a decently planted tank, so bio won't be an issue at all.

What do you think? too crowded looking? too much movement?

Thanks!
 

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I really like the sound of that stock list. The gouramis stay on the small side, and a small school of them with some CPDs sounds really cool. I would stick with the asian stock and instead of corydoras, get some Siamese algae eaters, and some dojo and khuli loaches.

Maybe double up on the water changes if it makes you feel more comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I really like the sound of that stock list. The gouramis stay on the small side, and a small school of them with some CPDs sounds really cool. I would stick with the asian stock and instead of corydoras, get some Siamese algae eaters, and some dojo and khuli loaches.

Maybe double up on the water changes if it makes you feel more comfortable.
Thanks for the suggestions! Funny story, I have 3 really little SAEs I bought a few weeks ago. But I heard they would outgrow a 40 gallon breeder at 4-6 inches large, and might be fussy with the other fish. They're in a breeder box in that tank right now and I was going to give them to my friend's dad that has a 90g. You think SAEs would actually do ok in a tank that small?

I was going to shoot for loaches, but the wife vetoed. She didn't like the looks of them, so it sent me on a quest for some version of dwellers. She liked the corys and the SAEs.
 

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Thanks for the suggestions! Funny story, I have 3 really little SAEs I bought a few weeks ago. But I heard they would outgrow a 40 gallon breeder at 4-6 inches large, and might be fussy with the other fish. They're in a breeder box in that tank right now and I was going to give them to my friend's dad that has a 90g. You think SAEs would actually do ok in a tank that small?

I was going to shoot for loaches, but the wife vetoed. She didn't like the looks of them, so it sent me on a quest for some version of dwellers. She liked the corys and the SAEs.
You are probably right. I forgot to take into account their potential size as adults. I always just think of them as jumbo otos.
 

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You are probably right. I forgot to take into account their potential size as adults. I always just think of them as jumbo otos.
To your credit, a 40g would be fine for probably 2 or maybe even 3 of them, but I think they'd look really big compared to honey gouramis and Danios. And I'm terrified of accidentally getting a flying fox or something that looks exactly the same and they terrorize the inhabitants :laugh2:

I am really sold on the Danios too. Just looking for a dweller I think unless the danios and the honeys would make it too busy.

Bump! Any ideas, anyone? Any concerns with the stocking list above? The gouramis sure have settled in nicely :)
 

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I would not do dojo loaches. Those get really massive. Instead, I'd suggest looking more into rosy loaches! They're pygmy cory size, but loaches and native to the same area as CPD's! They also don't really look "loach"-y.

What about a school of Hara jerdoni? Those are more commonly associated with dwarf pea puffers though....

My only suggestion is to look into making two baby brine shrimp hatcheries. I think your fish would greatly appreciate being fed baby brine shrimp!
 

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In my 90 gallon w/ 30 gallon sump I have:

-20 Habrosus Cory
-25 Cardinal Tetras
-5 ember tetras
-7 Paskai Rainbows
-5 Kuhli Loaches

And it feels overstocked/crowded. I think that is way too many fish for a 40 gallon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would not do dojo loaches. Those get really massive. Instead, I'd suggest looking more into rosy loaches! They're pygmy cory size, but loaches and native to the same area as CPD's! They also don't really look "loach"-y.

What about a school of Hara jerdoni? Those are more commonly associated with dwarf pea puffers though....

My only suggestion is to look into making two baby brine shrimp hatcheries. I think your fish would greatly appreciate being fed baby brine shrimp!
I'll check into that. Thanks!

Bump:
In my 90 gallon w/ 30 gallon sump I have:

-20 Habrosus Cory
-25 Cardinal Tetras
-5 ember tetras
-7 Paskai Rainbows
-5 Kuhli Loaches

And it feels overstocked/crowded. I think that is way too many fish for a 40 gallon.
Interesting how wildly off aquadvisor is on this one.... The stocking list I gave was a good amount below 100% according to aquadvisor, and I was questioning it.

I would assume none of the pearl celestial danios would fit according to your stocking thoughts, or would some work ok in there?
What about a common otocinclus in place of the pygmy corys?
 

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I have a totally different view on stocking as I often try things which may/may not work out as my tanks are often prone to changes. That leaves me often doing fish that are supposed to grow too large and I find they work fine as they don't do what the books say or they take so long to grow to the size stated, that it never becomes a problem.
Algae eaters may someday grow too large, or not! I keep tiger loaches and the "book" says they can get to 16 inches but that is not a problem as mine have never gotten more than 6 inches in the time I kept them, so I love the color and enjoy them if I feel they fit.
But I will also state that I treat fish very much like I might treat roommates. As long as they fit, they stay but if there is trouble, they are out of here!
Too much time, too much sweating small details that may never happen so I go for what fits at the time and move them if they don't!
NEVER, ever, marry your fish!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have a totally different view on stocking as I often try things which may/may not work out as my tanks are often prone to changes. That leaves me often doing fish that are supposed to grow too large and I find they work fine as they don't do what the books say or they take so long to grow to the size stated, that it never becomes a problem.
Algae eaters may someday grow too large, or not! I keep tiger loaches and the "book" says they can get to 16 inches but that is not a problem as mine have never gotten more than 6 inches in the time I kept them, so I love the color and enjoy them if I feel they fit.
But I will also state that I treat fish very much like I might treat roommates. As long as they fit, they stay but if there is trouble, they are out of here!
Too much time, too much sweating small details that may never happen so I go for what fits at the time and move them if they don't!
NEVER, ever, marry your fish!
I like that. "Never, ever, marry your fish". Very good perspective. I will keep that in mind. I guess in a way, I have done something similar.

looking at the tank, I do enjoy the honeys in there by themselves. I learned they are "wild caught" honeys. Not as bright as ones you would normally see, but I like their uniqueness. I also enjoy seeing them so free in the tank, and realize when they're active, they can be pretty much all over, and do tend to be in groups of 3 up to all 9 together.

I'm now somewhat thinking about otos instead of the pygmy corys. I think they'd do far better for a cleaning crew than the corydoras. I am just deciding on how many before it looks too crammed. I dislike crammed looking tanks. Of course, online, you see all sorts of different answers for how many to keep together, and stocking ideas around 10g for the common otos...

Any suggestions on how many to get for the tank plus the 9 honeys?
 

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Well, my 10 gallon currently has 6 otocinclus, and is sparsely planted (a baseball sized amount of java moss + bare bottom + leaves), and I really only see 3 or 4 at a time at a glance. You could probably start out with 10 and see where it goes from there. I'd caution using Otos as "just" a cleanup crew. They really like the biofilm on leaves and wood, as well as Repashy soilent green (never seen them eat it, but they always have far larger stomachs the day after I toss some in).

Also, mine don't school. I'm not sure if I just don't have the right tank, but I have yet to see any schooling or shoaling behavior like I see with Pygmy corys.
 

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That is where we each may see different things when we look at the same tank and I have no disagreement with what any others may see! When some look at a heavily planted tank they see lack of space, while I may want more fish as they are more often hidden in the plants.
I think part of that view is where our primary interests lie as some like to watch the fish whole others are more prone to admire the plants!
For fish in this case, I do love the goofy little cories as I find them to be kind of the clowns of the tank if there is a group. Oto are okay but I have never had them for any real amount of time as the cories are so much fun.
I would not disagree with 6-10 of either! Oto may be good cleaners but I tend to keep African cichlids who love the algae so I have been one of those who doesn't object to having a bunch of algae in the tank!
Very much a personal choice thing and that is where I often wind up with fish from trading that may or may not fit the plans but at times I keep them for a time and grow to like them enough to just set a tank and may build around them.
I got the clown loaches in a trade for a tank and wound up then building a South and Central American cichlid tank around the loaches!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Awesome! Thanks, everyone! I get this is part where everyone has vastly different opinions. That's part of the fun though is hearing what other people have to say!

I decided to go with 5 otos to start tonight. They are not my only clean-up crew. I have 4 nerites as well currently.

No shrimp at the moment as the honeys may find them as a snack, although I may throw an amano in there and see how they react once the tank fills in with plants a bit more. If they leave him be, I may add more. Loved the idea of the SAEs, but just not the right tank for it.

100% agree thr otos are not "shoaling" like I think of shoaling. They may like to be around their kind, but they have also no problems being on different ends of the tank.

Also agree it is tough to find them. They get lost in there (i like plants, so everything gets lost in my tanks).

May either have a small group of the silly corys, or add a couple more otos. once things become more planted and settle down, all depending on how the activity in the tank goes.

I do agree the danios will be too much as the gouramis occupy pretty much the whole tank (upper mid and lower). Would love to get them one day though. They look super cool.

So far I love the tank. With the gouramis, the few nerite snails, and the few otos, I really like the livestock. It is enough activity to see, but enough concealment where it looks more natural. When it fills in, that is when I'll think about adding the additional otos or corys (different clean up crew for sure).

I'd take pictures, but the seller of my plants and I had a rough USPS experience where the package showed up after 9 days. Much go our surprise, some of the plants survived. They melted down, and are sprouting again. The gouramis love to munch on the melted plant leaves i missed, so all is well. Just too emberassed to show it until it grows in!

I really owe all of you and this forum a big thank you. I learn a lot from all of you.

I appreciate all the feedback!
 
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