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Normal for Crypt Parva?

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I'm a beginner who started a planted tank almost three weeks ago. I've noticed some melt on my Crpyt Wendtii, a lot of melt on one of my Anubias Nana, and more recently noticed my Crypt Parva looking like this. Is this normal? It's almost as if it's rotting...
Plant Ingredient Terrestrial plant Grass Insect
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clean off the rotting material on your other clumps. try to separate and plant each indivdual parva. it is a slow growing crypt and takes a while to get established. your substrate looks a bit too fine.

your tank is probably not fully cycled yet so either dim lights or reduce photoperiod to reduce risk of algae. wendtii and nana are low light plants, parva needs a little more. after tank cycles, increase lighting slightly and start lean fertilization.
 

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Crypts that are newly planted or go through significant environmental changes can melt, so what you are seeing is normal based on my personal experiences. If those were originally grown emersed, you should expect a lot of melting and eventually most of the original leaves will die as new submerged growth comes in. Agree with the poster above about just removing the dead plant matter. Parva is a difficult one for me; it is a slow grower so try and be patient with it.
 

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Well boo... I got several recommendations so this is annoying.
It can work in a low-tech environment. But it's tricky even for longtime hobbyists.

I've had it in low-tech shrimp scapes for years without CO2 but it does not thrive like it does with CO2. And on occasion, it completely dies out. I find it does best with Aqua Soil Amazonia, decent flow, cool temps. Water hardness can also impact it on occasion. I've always had the best luck keeping it in 0 kH 5 gH water. Others have kept it in a wide range of parameters but those who have the best luck, I think, are using pressurized CO2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It can work in a low-tech environment. But it's tricky even for longtime hobbyists.

I've had it in low-tech shrimp scapes for years without CO2 but it does not thrive like it does with CO2. And on occasion, it completely dies out. I find it does best with Aqua Soil Amazonia, decent flow, cool temps. Water hardness can also impact it on occasion. I've always had the best luck keeping it in 0 kH 5 gH water. Others have kept it in a wide range of parameters but those who have the best luck, I think, are using pressurized CO2.
I appreciate info! I think I'll replace with dwarf hair grass if/when it dies and just deal with the maintenance of it propagating.
 

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I appreciate info! I think I'll replace with dwarf hair grass if/when it dies and just deal with the maintenance of it propagating.
If you go that route, make sure you buy a ton of it. Separate it into 4-5 plantlet groups (not clumps) and plant it in an intricate checkerboard pattern. That will allow it to thicken up and spread more quickly, covering more ground and making the carpet look more complete.

But you may also find it's a bit less than ideal if you aren't using CO2. If you aren't using CO2, it'd do best in a nutrient-rich substrate. Some varieties can do okay in low-tech setups but most won't thrive unless there's CO2 and a good fert supply. You're likely not going to achieve a carpeted look in your setup, unfortunately, without CO2 or a lot of effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you go that route, make sure you buy a ton of it. Separate it into 4-5 plantlet groups (not clumps) and plant it in an intricate checkerboard pattern. That will allow it to thicken up and spread more quickly, covering more ground and making the carpet look more complete.

But you may also find it's a bit less than ideal if you aren't using CO2. If you aren't using CO2, it'd do best in a nutrient-rich substrate. Some varieties can do okay in low-tech setups but most won't thrive unless there's CO2 and a good fert supply. You're likely not going to achieve a carpeted look in your setup, unfortunately, without CO2 or a lot of effort.
I actually prefer not to have carpeting so this may work. I will fertilize for sure both with root tabs and fertilizer in the water column
 

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I actually prefer not to have carpeting so this may work. I will fertilize for sure both with root tabs and fertilizer in the water column
As long as you do that and take your time with it, it may do well for you. Especially if you aren't trying to achieve the carpeted look.
 

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I would go with a Pygmy/micro chain sword. They can do well in low-tech. Even if your not going for a full carpet, a plant that is not well suited for low-tech can easily be an algae magnet. One problem with the parva, is that it's so slow growing in low-tech that it's leaves attract organics which creates algae issues. Once you have algae, it will interfere with future growth.

You could try the DHG, but results will vary greatly as mentioned in terms of light, ferts, maintenance habits.
 

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I have Parva doing well in my low tech. I'm using ADA Aquasoil capped with Flourite. I did have some melt when I first planted it but most of it survived. I set the tank up back in July and I used 12 pots of Parva. I kept Parva once before in low tech. I had it growing in play sand but I was dosing ferts. It grows very very slow. I keep my tanks at 80*F. I'm patient and willing to wait long term to get it to grow.
 
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