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Hiya!

I've just "renovated" my 90 gallon aquarium and I need to know if my plants are going to be healthy and their needs are going to be catered.

Here are some specs:

- 90G aquarium.
- I'd say my aquarium is now moderately planted (not heavy, not light).
- Currently sitting at 64W of lighting (2 bulbs of 32W each).
- I got 2 different substrates, one is sand and the other is some planted aquarium substrate (can't remember the brand)
- No other fertilizers were inserted afterwards

Good, now that were on the same page, I'd like to ask a few questions:

- How does one begin CO2 injections? I've been reading alone on a few websites and some try to explain it to me like I'm a biologist. I think I'm going to need more CO2 in my tank, but I'm unaware of the risks (pH fluctuations, etc) or how often should I change my makeshift CO2 injectors. Also,

- Is the lighting OK? I've read that I should go for 1.5 watts per gallon, and that would mean that I'm significantly short.

- Should I put in some liquid fertilizers, or is a CO2 injector plenty?

That should be all for now, I will probably raise more questions in the comments if I have any. Thanks for reading!

EDIT: Here's an album to my planted tank: http://imgur.com/a/ljcvI
 

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your light is kinda low so there is no need for CO2 at this point, although the plant will benefit a little from it. I see that you have some hairgrass in there and I don't think your light is strong enough for it to grow.

Nice layout!
 

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You need to start running the CO2 during the day when you are home. It can buld up during the night and suffocate the fish. During the day you can both watch what is going on and the plants will produce at least a little Oxygen so the fish will be allright.

Keep in mind that the CO2 flow can vary. You set it at certain level but 10 minutes later it is either up or down. This is if you use pressurized CO2. If you use a yeast DIY setup then you have no control.

Please do not be in a hurry with adding fertilizers to the water. Keep in mind that most people in this hobby are too centered around adding fertilizers in the water. You need to start this VERY carefully and watch the plants.

Your first goal needs to be setting up a stable CO2 supply and a reasonable light period (8-10 hours a day). Your fish will pollute the water to a point where algae are very likely to show up early on. This is because your plants are not growing very well yet. When they start to grow they will take care of some of the fish waste.

These gold fish you got there very much determine that your tank will be hard to keep clean. Adding fertilizers to the water is both a hope that the plants will grow well and the worst thing you can do to add to the waste that the goldfish release. So be carefull adding anything to the water.

Your best move is to change water every other day - only 10% of the volume, not more. This will help you tremendously. When you add CO2 things will be happening way fast so the water changes will become very important.
 

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I'm with karce87, I feel you don't need CO2 injection right now seeing your lighting is low and you only have a small selection of plants. Excel dosing would be perfect or even Sicce Life 2 unit would work. I would dose ferts as they always benefit plant growth. I recommend a dry mix since with a "wet" mix, you are paying for water too. Green leaf aquarium offers Green Fert package ($20) which includes macro and micro nutrients. I bought this for my 125 back in March and still have some. If it were me, I would focus on lighting first, then worry about CO2 injection; especially if your on a tight budget. I can help guide you through injection if you'd like, PM me.
 

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Pictures?
 

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Don't use Watts per gallon when talking about lighting. Use PAR. You can use co2 with any strength of lighting, it just depends how much co2 to balance with the light. Your fixture seems to be a dual t8 bulb fixture, and if you check the reflectors, if it is white, then your lighting is probably insufficient, but if it is shiny with individual reflectors for each bulb, then your light might be pretty strong
 

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I started quite a few tanks like that, and I improved things in this order:

1) No plants, high fish load.
2) Added some plants. Did not do well
3) Doubled the lighting. T-12 and T-8 bulbs. Aimed for 2 wpg (That was the way things were measured then), and moved the tanks closer to the windows.
4) Added potassium and iron fertilizer. (Leaf Zone)
5) Added Excel.

I would double your light, add CO2 slowly, as suggested above, and start with the fertilizers that are most likely in short supply. Most often this is potassium and iron. Fish food (not messy fish) will probably supply enough of the other nutrients until you get the other things straightened out.
 

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LED with your size tank may give you low light, probably at best. If you do strips, you could better with the ability to run more than typical fixture. In my opinion, I would do T5 NO, or just go T5 HO (which would probably be med-high lighting).


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