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New to planted tank, not new to aquariums. Can I plant HC after the tank is flooded?

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I took a break after my cichlid died, as he was with me for 12 years. This time I have decided to add CO2 and go for a planted tank, and, as part of that process I have a flourite substrate, decent lighting, and a regulator / tank / etc on the way. The tank itself is a 29 gallon with a canister filter in the cabinet.

It is already flooded and currently has a few snails, amazon swordgrass, and anubias. The plants have been in there for a few weeks and have slowly grown even without CO2.

I'm interested in adding Hemianthus callitrichoides / HC Cuba, and I'm wondering how difficult of a task this will as the tank is already partially planted and fully flooded. What are my best options here? Obviously I would have the CO2 up and running before planting HC.

Thanks!
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I'm having a slight bit of problem keeping the HC Cuba down in the substrate right now. I have Fluval Stratum substrate. I originally put it in last Friday. Eventually it will anchor in.
 

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Are we talking tissue culture or a pot? How powerful is your lighting? I tried HC in my larger tanks with fluorite sand and always had difficulty getting it to grow. Back then i wasnt consistent with ferts though and lighting wasnt as high as it needed at the substrate level. My cories would dislodge them sifting around in the sand so they never managed to establish great roots.
 

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hc does not need high light levels. but it needs good co2 levels. i believe it can thrive with a par of 40 at the substrate.
This is true.
HC doesn't need that much light. Instead CO2 is very important.
You should guide CO2 to substrate level to grow HC well.
CO2 does not automatically distribute itself around the tank equally like other ferts so its bit more complex.

CO2 is affected by a lot of stuffs.
Injection rate(obviously), flow rate, flow pattern, degree of surface agitation, presense of surface scum, density/height/types of plant mass, temperature, light level, nutrient levels, even water level and tank volume:height ratios..
So you need to fiddle around a bit until you nail it for your tank. Its one of the most difficult things to master.

I think fluorite isn't ideal for planting HC..but never used it personally. So cannot tell.
 

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don't waste your money on a drop checker.
I agree to this generally. Drop checkers are crap for gauging general tank CO2.

But it can be useful when you want to measure CO2 of a specific point (usually low flow zone near substrate or dead spots behind hardscape).

To be fair it still sucks.....but when other option is few thousand dollars worth lab machine we make do with what we have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
make sure you dial-in your co2, i cannot stress this enough. this explains how to do it. get a pH pen or monitor, don't waste your money on a drop checker.
Eyes the drop checker in my shipment suspiciously.

I will be using an inline diffuser and was hoping that this would disperse the CO2 evenly-ish, but perhaps this is not the case. I'll check out that guide now. Thanks!
 

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Eyes the drop checker in my shipment suspiciously.

I will be using an inline diffuser and was hoping that this would disperse the CO2 evenly-ish, but perhaps this is not the case. I'll check out that guide now. Thanks!
I would definitely get a drop checker especially if your new to this. Drop checkers although delayed can still give you a quick glance at what's going on. You want passive (drop checker) and proactive (ph drop) checks. No reason not to have a drop checker.
 

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Agree with Asteroid. Drop checkers are great passive indicator of something happening with your CO2. I have a number of times noticed that the checker was blue at a glance and found that something had happened to the CO2 (power was off or gas was out) which I may not have noticed for days.

As for tissue culture HC... I suggest using a sharp knife or razor and cutting plugs of a 1/4 - 1/2 inch. I find it damages the plant less than pulling it apart by hand and having all sorts of stray stems sticking out.
 
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