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Seems like a TON of spots for failure. Simple is better, I would put the barrel and ro alone, with a pump to the tank. I would then put the canisters on tank. And with a Y valve and a few on/offs you could use the same pump from the barrel to drain the tank, though you will find once siphon is started no need for a pump to drain if level or below tank level.

Don't over complicate this. I promise you that the worst CAN happen....
 

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Let me just say this again, to be clear. The way designed, it will not work. You will have entirely too many pumps to get to work together. Make this simple. If you want a central system, I recommend you look into them. If you just want to make water changes easier, there are much easier and safer ways to do it...

Not trying to crush your dreams. But I am trying to save you money up front and down the road when you are replacing floors, drywall, and paying intek for a mold removal...
 

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I see what you are saying. That's something to think about. Just use the barrels to store the water and pump in only after the actual tanks have been drained. That is a way easier system than what I have in the design.
I promise, easier is better
Part of the reason I wanted to have the barrels connected this way, was to have all the water parameters 100% identical between the two tanks. Also, by having the canisters connected to the barrel, I could heat and treat the water before it ever enters either tank.
Why do they need to be 100% identical? If you are using RO/DI water, you are going to need to reconstitute it somehow before putting fish in with it. You cannot use just pure RO/DI water. You need SOMETHING in your water... YOu can put a heater and airstone in the RO/DI tank, then use a simple formula to add the same amount of seachem equilibrium or whatever you use and it will be the same for both tanks. The tank that concerns me is the "live" tank. If what you want is a central system with connected tanks, research that. This is not the right way to do it. Pumps fail, people mess up, and there are a lot of failure points here. 4 active pumps(including canister) is asking for trouble. YOu prob wouldn't even need a chiller if you removed some of the electronics from your system...
Further, long runs for most pumps means crappy output and more stress on them. You'll either spend too much or get subpar performance.

You could likely outfit each tank with cannister filters, inline heaters, etc on EACH tank for less than this, and end up with better filtration.

Think "quality" not "quantity".
When you say the worst can happen, I do not see what could happen with this design. Maybe I am just naive, but I do not see what could go wrong in this setup. I would like to hear your thoughts on what could go wrong if you see something that sticks out. Obviously things like the tank breaking a seal on the glass or a tube getting punctured could happen. Other than that, though, I do not see what could go wrong. Please enlighten me.
The trouble is you have added extra points of failure. Pumps are the most likely, hose connections, switches you have to remember to turn on and off. Overflows that can fail, etc, etc, etc.
 

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When using a "sump" style setup, which you basically have 2 sumps plus a canister filter... you have several points of failure. A point of failure is a chance of flooding.

If the power goes out the main barrel has to have room for the reserve volume of TWO tanks, not one.

If what you want is a barrel to be central, run ONE sump with all filtration with both tanks coming to it. Not a barrel hooked to a sump with a canister filter as a red headed step child in between.

There are lots of ways to run multiple tanks on one filtration system, this is basically a few things thrown together hoping they work.

Not trying to be rude, just think it is silly to spend so much money to do something that could actually be done better for less.
 

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I do not undertand this. This is not in the diagram. The canister is not "inline" with anything other than a chiller and a heater. The only reason for this is reuse/recyle; just for the pump inside. Not filtration. I only have one sump in this diagram, unless you are refering to two pumps one going to each tank. Also, all filtration is in the barrel with both tanks leading to it. I guess I don't understand what you are saying.
Obviously you missed the tongue in cheek reference. My bad.

You have a barrel and a sump, essentially two sumps. Why not just use a barrel as a sump, or a sump as a sump... Not both.

Simple, take line from tank A and tank B and run them into the SAME line, then run to sump. Then run your two pumps back to the tank. Put chiller on the output side of one of the tanks, which will in turn cool both tanks.

Search for "sump for multiple tank" or "central aquarium filtration".

I just designed all of that with 2 pumps for the filtration and 1 for the water changer. This will 1) allow you less pumps(save money up front, on energy, on chiller, and on replacement). 2) allow less failure points(it isn't about not being able to do anythign about them... you can... make LESS points of failure). 3) created more effecient, higher quality filtration with LESS BYPASS.

The way you have it designed, a huge portion of the water could come in and go right back to the tank without ever being filtered. This will mean your chiller will be really inefficient, your filtration will be inefficient, and your energy bill will be inefficient.

It seems you have your mind up, so I won't go on and on. Just understand that many of us have ran multiple tanks on one filtration system before. There is no need to make something so hodge-podge thrown together when for less money you could do it and have likely better results.
 

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I only speak from experience. If you are set on having it be on a central system, you really should look at some of the examples out there. The easiest to maintain and the most efficient to use are the simplest ones, usually.

IN the end, you will spend more time looking at your tank instead of what is under and behind.

With a planted tank, efficient mechanical filtration is essential. I recommend using filter socks on the input into the sump for quick, easy change out.

LIke so.


Allows you to switch out prefilters without even stopping flow. Plus it will make maintaining the rest even easier.


In the end you will find what is best, but you might be like some of us and end up doing it 3 or 4 times and spending wayyy too much before you get it just right. Thats what most of us do in most of this hobby.
 

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The sock is a cpr aquatics, runs about 20 bucks with the mount. Get a couple of the socks so you can switch them out quick.

Sorry if I sounded discouraging, I just know what it is like to design, build, spend and then end up having to do it over again. and again. and again.

For the sump, provide as much room as possible.
 
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