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The Security Dude
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I did 3 five gallon jugs with my new ro unit. It is a 6 stage 150gpd unit. I get tds 0, my tap is only 30 as is. My tap readings are as follows right now ph 7.1 gh0-1 kh0 tds 30

After running it through the ro and letting it airate for 72 hours them letting 2 power heads run it through a 30 gallon for another 48 hours I still am getting a ph of 5.3

I font get it. This is my 5th time doing this to see if there are any changes, none what so ever same readings as before.

Everyone I hear about says it should be ph 7. Never has it been like this. Old unit brought it to 6.0. That is why I changed it was a cheaper unit so I upgraded to a nice one.
 

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You should be just fine where you are. There's nothing really in the water to buffer it, so your pH readings will fluctuate quite easily. I'm guessing the new system with the new filters, media, etc, is what is giving you the different values against your old one.

Here's a reference page that talks about RO water and expected values, and you're pretty much smack dab in the middle of the range, right on the nose.

http://www.puretap.com/ph.htm
 

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my ro stayed low like that and mine starts at about 7.3. it never went up and the api kit just has a 5 and moves to 6 ranges on ph. with my amazonia i still get about 6.4 ph so im not worried about it
 

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You should be fine once pour the water to the tank.
basically there is nothing in the water.

you may need to add GH booster to desired level you want before pour it into the tank.
 

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The Security Dude
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have tested after adding some ss plus and it is 5.3. Lucky all my tb and prl seem to like it because they are breeding like crazy in 5.1 pH right now. As that is where the Amazonia is buffering it too

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I have tested after adding some ss plus and it is 5.3. Lucky all my tb and prl seem to like it because they are breeding like crazy in 5.1 pH right now. As that is where the Amazonia is buffering it too

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I am seeing about the exact same thing. I have a 33L with about a 3" substrate of ADA, and like what you are seeing, it buffers mine to around 5.4. The TB and mishlings love it, though. I'm actually pretty happy with this setup as my intuition would tell me that if the re-mineralized RO water is around 5.5 in my case, and the ADA is only pulling it down to 5.4, that doesn't seem like much "stress" on the buffering substrate. Maybe that will help it last longer? My line of thinking is versus putting in water with like 7 or higher pH which it has to really pull down. Time will tell, I guess.
 

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I am seeing about the exact same thing. I have a 33L with about a 3" substrate of ADA, and like what you are seeing, it buffers mine to around 5.4. The TB and mishlings love it, though. I'm actually pretty happy with this setup as my intuition would tell me that if the re-mineralized RO water is around 5.5 in my case, and the ADA is only pulling it down to 5.4, that doesn't seem like much "stress" on the buffering substrate. Maybe that will help it last longer? My line of thinking is versus putting in water with like 7 or higher pH which it has to really pull down. Time will tell, I guess.

I have several tanks going on 4+ years with the same substrate using RO/DI water and SS GH+!!!!
 

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Yeah, most of us have gone to using regular measuring spoons rather than the one included. For me, I add 1/2 tsp to 5 gal (plus 1/8 tsp of TDS up) to get my desired parameters. For others, it can be more. Best way is to add measured amounts slowly and test until you find the levels you want.
 

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I have several tanks going on 4+ years with the same substrate using RO/DI water and SS GH+!!!!
That is great news! It hurts the pocketbook to load up those bigger tanks with a deep ADA substrate bed! It's been worth it for how well the shrimp have done for me so far in those tanks, but I have been hoping that the substrate holds up.
 

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Yeah, most of us have gone to using regular measuring spoons rather than the one included. For me, I add 1/2 tsp to 5 gal (plus 1/8 tsp of TDS up) to get my desired parameters. For others, it can be more. Best way is to add measured amounts slowly and test until you find the levels you want.
I have been checkinh tds and haven't measure GH for the longest time. As I remember, when I use the scoop, it gave me a tds of 130 and gh 5. 1 tsp resulted in tds of 150 and gh 7.
 

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So I recently had an experience that has brought me back to testing my GH each time.

Last week, I got prepped to do a water change. I filled up my jugs with RO water, added my Salty remineralizer, added my Mosura TDS Up - all according to my pre-planned measurements, mixed it well, checked the TDS which was right at 150, and then did my water change on one of my 33L tanks. As I was changing the water, I noticed that my shrimp were more active. This isn't completely unusual, as they sometimes bump up in activity with a water change, but this time, it seemed just a bit more. I kept watching them, nobody showed any signs of stress, just increased activity - similar to when the males are looking for a female that has recently molted. Anyway, after further observation, every one seemed just fine. I finished up my work and went into my office. I got to thinking about it and remembering other people's experiences on this forum, and I got to thinking that maybe there was a bit of a temperature shock. Since this is one of the tanks that my Apex controller monitors, I thought I'd just check to see what the temp reading showed during the water change. Well, it wasn't the temp that spiked, but rather this...



Now, suddenly, I got worried, and puzzled. I racked my brain trying to figure out what had happened for my pH to spike wildly like that. I had used my normal recipe, I had spot checked my TDS, and it was right at 150ish which is what I wanted. It was stumping me as to what had happened. So, I went back up to my shelf, picked up my Salty Shrimp container, and realized that I had done everything exactly as I normally do, except that I grabbed the Salty Shrimp GH/KH+ (for Neo's) rather than my Salty Shrimp GH+ that I use for the Cards. Both are large, bulk containers, both are white, but of course, they have the different labels. I didn't notice this when adding the powder that I was taking it from the wrong container for tank that I was changing. Because I had only spot checked by TDS - and with the Mosura TDS up, it was exactly where I wanted it to be, I had missed a key warning sign. I had enough water left to do a quick test, and sure enough, the GH was right at 6. When I do it with the correct Salty Shrimp GH+ powder for 5 gallons, it never goes above 5.

Once I realized my mistake, I quickly removed some more water from the tank, and started replacing it from my pure RO water storage that I have right there in the room in case of emergency. I did several iterations of removing tank water, replacing with RO, and then monitoring the Apex to see the progress. In the end, the recovery worked exactly how I wanted it to - a slow drawing of the pH back down to roughly the previous levels. I didn't want any more shocking as they had already had that. But, I did want it to work back down to normal levels. In the end, I only lost 1 shrimp about 2 days later. I'll never know for sure if it was this incident that caused it or not, but I'll tell myself it was just to be a bit more cautious in the future.

Some things that I learned from this are:
  • It's very good to have emergency RO water on hand in your fish room. When you need it in a hurry, it is sure nice not to have to scramble to get it.
  • I now labeled the top of my Salty container lids so that I remind myself what species should get the powder
  • For me, because I keep different species in the same room, a TDS check alone is not enough. I need to take the two minutes to double check the GH.
  • Get to know how your shrimp react during water changes, and watch for abnormal reaction. That hint that they were just a bit more active than normal was what led me to investigate more
  • Having an Apex monitor your high end tanks is certainly overkill, but, boy, can it be handy to have the automatic monitoring in situations like this. I'd never advocate a controller as standard equipment on a high-end shrimp tank, but I can't deny it was super helpful in this situation.

Hope others can learn from my mistake here. It ended fine, but I consider myself really lucky.
 

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If I remember correctly, pH levels are related to mineral and element content in the water. If you have really pure water (which you are getting out of a new RO/DI unit) then the pH will fall out the bottom until there are added minerals and elements that will buffer the pH back up. I bet that as soon as that unit starts to get used and broken in, you won't see the pH down that low.
 

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Here you go from this site: http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2005-05/rhf/index.htm

"1. The pH of totally pure water is around 7 (with the exact value depending on temperature). As carbon dioxide from the atmosphere enters the water, the pH drops into the 6’s and even into the 5’s, depending on the amount of CO2. At saturation with the level of CO2 in normal (outside) air, the pH would be about 5.66. Indoor air often has even more CO2, and the pH can drop a bit lower, into the 5’s. Consequently, the pH of highly purified water coming from an RO/DI unit is expected to be in the pH 5-7 range."

". The pH of highly purified water is not accurately measured by test kits, or by pH meters. There are several different reasons for this, including the fact that highly purified water has very little buffering capacity, so its pH is easily changed. Even the acidity or basicity of a pH test kit’s indicator dye is enough to alter pure water’s measured pH. As for pH meters, the probes themselves do not function well in the very low ionic strength of pure freshwater, and trace impurities on them can swing the pH around quite a bit."
 

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The Security Dude
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I know and have read that, that is why you airate it for for 48 hours. then you remineralize the water and test. I can tell you after doing that your water should move to some where around 7. Not a chance with this water.
 
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