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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a tank that has been through some ups and downs, but there are fish that I have owned for a year+ living happily in my tank. At least a dozen.

Any new fish I add to the tank are also living happily eating correctly, showing proper mannerisms for the species, etc. .... and then die, one by one, overnight (even if they're from the same batch, added at the same time) Water parameters are 0 ammo, 0 nitrite, <10 nitrate. What's goin' on?
 

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Sorry to answer with more questions, but how do you acclimate the fish? What kinds of fish are doing this and how long after they are added that this happens? Also, something I have encountered, how long have these fish been at the store when you got them? I realized some stores acclimate poorly and then when the fish is bought a couple days later it is still extremely stressed. This stress leads to a lesser chance of survival no matter how well they are acclimated, just a thought though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I work at the store where I buy my fish - I add mine straight to a "hospital" tank with a drip acclimation for ~2 hours. I feed them and etc and keep them in the store for 2 weeks before bringing them home. At home I repeat the process, but only ~1 hour. I also put API Stress Coat in the bag to transport them home. The time varies. I grabbed 3 bala sharks - one died the next day, one died the week after, and the last one kicked it today (almost 3 months later). Other casualties include rasbora, clown loaches, tetras, and danios.

Of note, some snails I got seem to be thriving (bought them as food for loaches, but now those are all deceased)
 

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Some of your hardier species like tetras can get used to pretty bad water conditions, if those conditions occur incrementally over a long period of time. Newer additions, even of the same species, may not tolerate those conditions. Other parameters besides the ones you listed may be off: hardness, pH, etc. You don't say how big your tank is. Clown loaches can grow to almost a foot long and should have at least 50 gallons. Bala sharks can get over a foot and need more like 70-75 gallons. Smaller volumes could be stressing them out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
They're in a 40 breeder show tank with ~70 gallons total water. All of the fish are still juvenile, though I'm aware of their later sizes. pH is 6.9-7.2, it fluctuates as my kh changes from plants. gh is ~ 100 ppm, kh is 5.

The water shouldn't be anything but perfect. I've been using the same RO/DI water for half a year. And as for hardy fish surviving - one of my earliest additions was a hillstream loach who is still just as happy as could be. From my understanding he shoudl have been first to go :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Maybe its a parasite or something....? but that wouldn't explain why the old fish don't die.
 

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It's not so much water volume as swimming room. Even juveniles can get stressed out in the wrong sized tank. Are you re-constituting that RO/DI water with a buffer? Without it, you can get wild pH swings, especially between your light and dark cycles. One way to minimize pH swings would be to put a light on your sump, on a reverse cycle from your DT.

The person I would refer you to is Neal Monks at WetWebMedia:

http://www.wetwebmedia.com/

Dude is an encyclopedia of freshwater fishkeeping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Water parameters are 0 ammo, 0 nitrite, <10 nitrate.
The ro/di is reconstituted with Kent's RO Rite for Planted Tanks to 7.0 ph. Swings of 0.1 ph happen over the course of a week or more; nothing drastic. I was unaware that juvies would stress out in a tank not suitable for an adult.
 

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What fish specifically do you have, and what fish specifically are you adding that are dying? Right off the bat, bala sharks get huge, and you shouldn't get them with your tank. Also, some tetras only like soft, low pH water. Names help very much.
 

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Considering most fish if not wild caught are farmed, I would think there could be some bad genetics. I've some deformed fish being sold.

The ones I get at Petsmart, haven't been strong enough where many eventually died off not from disease, just weak... have better luck with Petco's 5 for $5 sale.

Of course, when you have a lot of Amanos, don't even think of taking advantage of their return policy because the fish would be down to bones in no time or disappeared.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
harly rasboras
bala sharks
blue gourami
black neon tetras
tinwini danios
cory cats
hillstream loach

All of them have had die offs, completely random with no signs.
 
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