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New 7.9 Gallon Fluval Ebi

3011 Views 13 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  Ebi-san
Hi everyone,

I am really new to the hobby and currently have a 5G Fluval Chi filled with... dare I say it... plastic plants. I've always wanted a planted aquarium but juggling full time work with full time school with full time dog mommy duties just wasn't going to give me the time to invest in a planted tank. So right now, my Fluval Chi is home to a small colony of Opae'Ula shrimp, and they have been doing great for the past nine months I've had them. I never have any water issues as my tank is always clear, and I have not had any losses since the way beginning when I had to quickly learn how to prevent my filter from becoming a death machine.



[I don't know why my camera picks up on the light so much. The water is actually crystal clear in person.]

You can find a log of my shrimp antics on my YouTube channel here:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwcjNt5bT_T5c2JtNcfERc7-psaftcKnx&feature=c4-feed-u

Before my interest in Opae'Ula, I had looked into keeping Blue Tiger Shrimp because let's admit it: They look AWESOME. However, after doing my research, I decided that a beginner like me should not be attempting such expensive shrimp that require expert care, so I started with Opae'Ula because they are very hardy shrimp, and hardy is ideal for new hobbyists. Over the last nine months, I have grown to love shrimp keeping and feel that it's time to spread my wings and finally give Blue Tiger Shrimp and a planted tank a shot. I'm actually going to start off with a small batch of Red Cherry Shrimp since this will be my first freshwater tank, and once I'm comfortable with that, I will bring in the Blue Tiger Shrimp.

I purchased the 7.9 Gallon Fluval Ebi which comes with a 13W Fluval Mini Power Compact Lamp, Fluval Nano Internal Filter, Fluval Stratum substrate, and some other goodies. I will have to modify the filter for my shrimp needs and am looking to purchase an additional light. But in the meantime, it's going to be all about set-up and cycling, which gives me plenty of time to do additional research and figure out what plants I want in my tank. The plants will have to be compatible with the water parameters that the Blue Tiger Shrimp need and be hardy enough to thrive in a nano tank, since any fluctuations will have a much greater impact on the inhabitants than a normal sized tank.

Water Temp: 20°-25° C or 68°-77° F
pH Range: 6.5-7.2
Water Hardness: Soft
Fresh or Salt Water: Freshwater

Of course, I could go to Google, but you guys are the experts here. So far, swords and ferns look good for the mid-/background. If you have any suggestions for beginner-level fore-/mid-/background plants, I would really appreciate a starting point for my research. Thanks!

- Christine
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For shrimps... Moss are usually the best, easy maintenance as well and provides a great home to shrimplets. Only thing with other plants that require CO2/ferts can be a problem for sensitive shrimp casualties IF not carefully dosed correctly as some ferts carry copper which can kill shrimps (depends on copper amount, same to CO2, as too much CO2 can cause a ph drop and fluctuate)

I'm sure others can suggest you in the direction you need, but as far as moss, there's many such as x-mas moss, mini pelias, weeping, flame, peacock, fissidens, willow, taiwan moss. Which you might have seen some of these in aquascapes with the trees, bonsais etc
 

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I have looked into several types of mosses and have decided on the willow moss and possibly java moss. I know that CO2 and fertilizers aren't recommended for shrimp as they do cause casualties and affect breeding, so I am only using CO2 and fertilizers during my plant-only phase while I figure out what works and what doesn't (as this is my first experience with a planted tank) before introducing the shrimp. Thanks for the suggestions! =)
Co2 is possible with shrimps, but you must control the dosing correctly. You did mention it's your first experience, so I agree that it's probably best to take it slow and easy for now. High lighting + Co2 + Ferts would make the moss grow faster, fluffier, and lush. It will thrive well with low light also, but appearing more darker and less dense. Keep us updated!
 
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