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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The staff at the LFS wouldn't address my concerns about this light, nor would they answer my questions. Maybe some of you can help.

First, this is the strangest aquarium bulb I've ever seen. When turned on, only a narrow strip of the bulb actually lights up. All other aquarium bulbs that I've seen and used light up in their entirety.

That's the first issue.

The second problem is that ever since I got this bulb, I've had nonstop diatoms in my tank, despite weekly water changes, monthly filter cleanings, and all the other regular maintenance one is supposed to do.

Now, some basic information about this light:

It's a Life-Glo, 36" "High Intensity Reflector Lamp". It says on the box, which I've saved: "High noon spectrum for aquariums, terrariums and vivariums."

Other information on the box seem to be contradictory:

First, it shows the "light spectrum emitted" as being white, but the prism chart shows green spiking the highest of the individual spectrum colors.

This light is a T-10, 6700K, LUX 370.

It's made in Japan and listed as Art.# 1645, and is apparently put out by Hagan.

Other notes on the box say:

"Built-in reflector, which increases the intensity by 170%.

"Illumination reaches deep into the aquarium.

"Emits a natural white light suitable for all aquariums, terrariums and vivariums.

"Stimulates plants, aiding them in the photosynthesis process.

"Easily meets the needs of fish, reptiles and vivarium inhabitants.

"Closely simulates mid-day sunlight.

"Recommended in combination with Marine-Glo, Flora-Glo or Aqua-Glo.

The notes finish by saying, "Rapid start lamp, fitting all suitable standard and electronic ballasts."

First, there's no way I can use this in combination with any other bulb, because my ballast will only accommodate one bulb.

Secondly, it doesn't seem to be stimulating plant growth as it claims it does.

This could be because the leaves of my plants are now constantly covered with diatoms, despite my wiping off as much as I can with each water change. The glass gets covered with them, too. I no sooner complete aquarium maintenance than the diatoms start growing again. Prior to getting this light, I DIDN'T have that problem!

One final piece of information: This is a 36" bulb on a 65-gallon freshwater, coldwater tank. The box says this light can be used with both freshwater and marine aquariums.

The light is on a timer, and stays on roughly 12 hours or so.

Has anyone else used exactly this make and model of Life-Glo aquarium bulb? What has your experience been?

As previously stated, I was concerned about only a narrow strip of this bulb lighting up when plugged in, but the staff at the LFS kept ignoring this issue, forcing me to bring it up several times. Still, they wouldn't address it.

I would have waited and gotten a different bulb, but I needed a replacement immediately for the previous bulb I had, which had burned out.

Any helpful insights or information would be appreciated.

--Aquamom
 

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Sounds like a ballast incompatibility..or a bad ballast.
t10 is an odd diameter size anyways.
Can't find a1645 in their cat. either..
http://www.hagen.com/pdf/aquatic/GLO-Lighting-Guide.pdf

spectrum is fine..

diatoms are somewhat normal in a new tank set up, regardless of light.
If not a new set up.. ???? From the sound of it the light isn't functioning on a cylinders anyways..
for color reference..

Key words..
"Rapid start lamp, fitting all suitable standard and electronic ballasts."
What bulb did it replace????

sounds like the LFS was just happy to get rid of some old stock......regardless if it worked for you or not.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
This is an established aquarium. I've had it up and going since 2012.

I'm not sure what is meant by "built-in reflector". Looking at the bulb, it appears like the distinctly darkened area is actually a part of it. I can see the edges of this darkened area along the entire length of the bulb where it appears to begin and end, as though it were intentionally made that way. This ISN'T a separate apparatus -- it's part of the bulb, itself. The open part that lights up shines directly down into my aquarium. Maybe this is a means of concentrating or focusing the light?

This doesn't behave like a malfunctioning bulb. The part that lights up is very, very bright. It doesn't flicker on and off like a fluorescent bulb does when it's defective. Yet, I don't know! It may be that part of the light really isn't working as it should?

I tried to find this out when I purchased it, but either the staff didn't know or they were stonewalling for some reason.

Be that as it may, the edges of all the leaves on both of my Anubias, the only live plants I have in that tank, have curled downward and under, probably from the weight of the diatomic build-ups. They obviously aren't benefiting from the light. When I clean them off, they still are green, though some of their tips are much darker than the rest of the leaf.

Both Anubias recently bloomed in this tank, so they aren't being robbed of nutrients, or they wouldn't flower.

I just want to know what some of that terminology on the box means. Usually, a reflector is a separate piece of equipment, but nothing like that came with this bulb. So, maybe that darkened portion IS the "reflector"?

I no longer remember what my previous bulb was -- it was just a standard fluorescent aquarium bulb. It CERTAINLY DIDN'T look like this one! The tank and lids are Aqueon, and the bulb and ballast are enclosed within a hood that rests on top of the clear glass lids. They may or may not also be Aqueon.

I purchased the tank set-up from a different LFS than where I got this new light.

I, too, tried to find Art #1645 among the Life-Glo listings, and it wasn't there. Makes me think it's either an off-brand, or so new that it hasn't yet made it into the literature. Perhaps the list hasn't been updated for awhile?

It's hard to know what I actually have, because I can't get any clarifications.
 

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It's a Life-Glo, 36" "High Intensity Reflector Lamp". It says on the box, which I've saved: "High noon spectrum for aquariums, terrariums and vivariums."
This right here leaps out at me. Too much light which is probably causing your diatom issue as this tank is not new.

I'm guessing there is no way to dim this light? If not,do you have floating plants such as Frog Bit to act like a light filter?

Any chance you can return it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've tried floating hornwort, and it wouldn't stay at the surface. It kept descending to the substrate, tangling up in the leaves of my Anubias, and wrapping itself around my prefilter sponge.

I could try resetting the timer to shorten the amount of time this light remains on.

I was hoping through this thread that I could finally learn what is meant by the term "built-in reflector", and why most of the bulb remains dark while only a portion of it lights up. Was it made that way, or is something wrong with it?

As far as being suitable for my ballast -- it fits and connects to it just fine. My husband is a licensed electrician, and he was with me when I got it. But even he can't seem to tell me why it looks that way. He would definitely know if it was a faulty bulb, though. If it wasn't right for my ballast, he would have said something. We brought my ballast and attached hood to the LFS and installed the light right there at the counter, using their plug-in. That way, there would be no doubt that it would fit correctly.

Why can't I find anywhere this particular model number, Art #A1645? That's very suspicious.

Maybe I'll try frogbit in the tank. But I don't want to blot out too much light, or it will defeat my purpose of faster and more vigorous plant growth.

Once I understand this light, I'll be able to make an intelligent decision about the diatoms. I know they're harmless, but they sure look awful!
 

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I've tried floating hornwort, and it wouldn't stay at the surface. It kept descending to the substrate, tangling up in the leaves of my Anubias, and wrapping itself around my prefilter sponge.

I could try resetting the timer to shorten the amount of time this light remains on.

I was hoping through this thread that I could finally learn what is meant by the term "built-in reflector", and why most of the bulb remains dark while only a portion of it lights up. Was it made that way, or is something wrong with it?

As far as being suitable for my ballast -- it fits and connects to it just fine. My husband is a licensed electrician, and he was with me when I got it. But even he can't seem to tell me why it looks that way. He would definitely know if it was a faulty bulb, though. If it wasn't right for my ballast, he would have said something. We brought my ballast and attached hood to the LFS and installed the light right there at the counter, using their plug-in. That way, there would be no doubt that it would fit correctly.

Why can't I find anywhere this particular model number, Art #A1645? That's very suspicious.
Getting there:
https://translate.google.com/transl...SUBCAT=112&PROD_ID=01016450040102&prev=search
- 30 W
- 90 cm
- Diameter 32.5 mm
- T10
- Life: 9000 hours
- Complete solar spectrum
- Tube window for direct illumination
- High intensity
- Harness natural white light suitable for aquariums, terrariums and vivariums
http://www.tropicalfish-scotland.com/aq_products_a_to_z.cfm?pid=288
 

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I'm surprised too much light is the thought here. A t10 that throws off 300ish lumens. I know lumens and lux don't mean much to growing plants but they do give an inclination of par and that is very low incomparison to experiences I have with lights. I have 2500 on a ten gallon right now.

What's your plant mass like? I think the algae you speak of can come from too little or too much light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you, Jeffkrol.

I see you found the elusive product code A1645. The specs for that light are exactly the same as mine with one minor exception. It has it on the screen as being 90 cm, whereas on my light's box, it shows 89,5 cm. They probably just rounded up to the nearest whole number. Everything else is the same.

The "tube window for direct illumination" explains the dark/light areas on my bulb. The portion where the light comes through is the "tube window". So it was obviously made that way. That may or may not be what is meant by a built-in reflector, but it does explain that design.

I think the confusion is a matter of language.

Thanks for helping clear that up. I know my bulb isn't defective.

Willcooper, I know nothing about LUX or Lumens, and when it comes to diatoms, I have read conflicting information. Some articles say too much light causes them, others say too low light.

Not sure what you mean by plant mass. I have two Anubias. One is about ten inches tall, the other about seven, and one is about a foot in its spread. The other about eight or ten inches wide. Those are currently the only two live plants in that tank, other than some free-rolling mossballs that have pretty much broken apart. There's one tall silkie, but that doesn't count. It doesn't care about lighting or anything else.

I will reduce the amount of time my light is on, and hope that will solve the problem.

I have saved Jeffkrol's link in my bookmarks for future reference.

The second link, to the Scotland page, features a similar product with the product code of A1636. It has it listed as being 91 cm. Says it's a T10, but shows the product type as T8 fluorescent aquarium bulbs. A little confusing, I must say.

I think all of this would be a lot easier to understand if the wording was uniform and apparent contradictions were explained and clarified.

This has been helpful. Thanks again.
 

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Willcooper, I know nothing about LUX or Lumens, and when it comes to diatoms, I have read conflicting information. Some articles say too much light causes them, others say too low light.

Not sure what you mean by plant mass. I have two Anubias. One is about ten inches tall, the other about seven, and one is about a foot in its spread. The other about eight or ten inches wide. Those are currently the only two live plants in that tank, other than some free-rolling mossballs that have pretty much broken apart. There's one tall silkie, but that doesn't count. It doesn't care about lighting or anything else.

I will reduce the amount of time my light is on, and hope that will solve the problem.
When someone says "plant mass" they are referring to the total mass of the plants. You could think of it as the total displacement of water caused by the plants. The plants you have a low to very low light plants. They are slow growers that can only utilize so much light. The light you have is going to place you in the very low light range. Probably 10 par or less at the substrate. 0-30 par is low 30-60 is medium and 60 and up is high light (figures are debatable of course. The algae you are getting can come from a newer tank, too little of light AND too much light. For too much light you can also look for other indicators such as GSA (green spot algae) and hair algae. Unless you are running your light for a very long time I can't imagine it's because you have too much light. But try what you are going to try and then update the thread with results so others who may buy this light can use this thread as a resource. Best of luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Along with the brown diatoms is a small amount of green pin dot algae on the glass. There is never much of this. It's harder to scrub off than the brown stuff. It's actually quite sparse.

Well, this has been educational. I got a light that claims it stimulates plant growth, yet is actually a low light according to the LUX rating (par).

Maybe it's because the illumination is so concentrated and reaches into the lowest depths of the tank that it's supposed to improve photosynthesis. Perhaps because of this (it says the built in reflector increases the intensity by 170%), the LUX can actually be a lower number due to the increased intensity?

I don't know if it's supposed to work that way, or not.

The original idea was that I would be able to add some higher-light loving plants, but haven't gotten around to getting them.

The light is currently left on for at least 12 hours.

As you can probably tell, I'm not a high tech person.

But, we'll see what happens with the adjustment I plan on making.

I just know the diatoms are very annoying, and a real pain to keep cleared out. Aside from a brief period when the tank was newer, I didn't have them prior to getting this bulb.

When I change the water, I remove about two-thirds of it. And siphon the substrate as often as possible. Then, it's scrub, scrub, scrub.

Thanks for the help. Maybe I'll happen onto the balance my tank needs to get rid of this stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
"Old item"? Suppose it has been discontinued? Could that be why the folks at the LFS were so eager to foist if off on me? Gosh, you'd think Hagen would know something about their own product, even an older one.

I've asked them about other things, though, and their responses are pretty lame.
 

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Just get a different bulb. If functional, this is an excellent bulb, sounds like maybe yours isn't. Diatoms probably coincidental, if not, consequence of the defective bulb. Just buy another. How hard is that? What am I missing?
 
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