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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been reading a lot of information but I still can't figure out why my cherry shrimp are dying. It always seems to be a couple of days after a water change. I am on a well and not sure what is in my water. Tank is 29 gallons and I do weekly water changes of around 7 gallons. I use prime when doing water changes and match the temp as closely as I can. I have seen a shrimp or two swimming around and then suddenly they turn over and sink to the bottom.
Here is what I do know
They are in a community tank with Corys, tetras, guppies and 2 leapord danios. None of the fish seem to be aggressive towards my shrimp.
Tank has lots of plants and driftwood for the shrimp to hide in.
Tank has been up since December and finished cycling in January.
Ammonia-0
PH-7.6
Nitrite-0
Nitrate-10 usually around 5 but I haven't done a water change in over a week.
Temp-78
I just bought a gh & kh test
Gh-50-100ppm
Kh-100-200ppm
Not sure I understand this test

I don't use ferts except for flourish root tabs for my amazon sword. No CO2 and I have the stock led lighting that came with my tank kit.

I have bought a handful of shrimp at a couple of different rims to replace the one I lost and I acclimate them for about 30 minutes. I have also been adding some plants to the tank. I just rinsed then under the faucet before I put them in the tank.

If anyone has experienced something like this or knows what I am doing wrong please let me know. I have dreams of dozens of shrimp tanks but if I can't keep cherry shrimp alive... Thanks in advance!!
 

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for liquid test kit (api) see this video:
1 drop at a time, gently mix (don't have to shake hard), keep count of drops, see when it changes color to know what your gh/kh is and check the paper chart that comes with it to get the proper measurement.
Mines gh160, kh 70.

People will ask about your TDS (total dissolved solids), as changes in this can effect shrimp. If you don't have a tds meter you can get one for cheap on e.bay or amazon (i still need to get one >.> )

I'm new to shrimp myself, but i was advised its best to add water into the tank simular to the drip method. Rather than pouring new water in, get a cup/bucket you can set on top of (or above the tank height) and use airline tubing to get a siphon going to put water in (you don't need the valve at the end to control flow for this).
My first water change with shrimp I just poured new water in with a clean cup, got the "twitches" for that and found 2 dead ones several days after. Most recent water change (and tank move where i saved and re-added the old water) I used the airline tubing and no ones twitching or dieing on me yet, they just go about their business as it fills in slowly.
Another thing: I've read using water from the hot tap is likely to have more harmful minerals than the cold tap including copper, that could effect shrimp. Don't know if this is true or just speculation but I draw my water from the cold tap the night before and use a 50w heater in the bucket to bring it up to tank temp for w/c next day (add prime to bucket before use)

But again, I'm a newbie to shrimp keeping, so someone else may be able to come in with more info or ideas as to why you are having problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was going to do a water change yesterday and I ran out of time. Before I went to bed last night I found another dead shrimp. I have been buying shrimp in batches because they usually only have about five or so at the store. This shrimp has been in the tank for at least a few weeks. He had a crack in his shell halfway through right above the tail. I now think my shrimp deaths are due to molting issues. Would high tds cause this? I will be looking for a tds meter today and will order online if I can't find one locally. What can I dose to help my shrimps molt properly?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So I just finished a small water change, 3 gallons. Usually I do 3 buckets which is 6 gallons. I fed the water in with a small drip line at full flow. I also used 1 gallon distilled and 2 gallons regular tap water. I am on a well and I don't have a tds meter yet but was thinking my tds is too high. I also reduced the temperature to 78 because when I went to check my tank this morning it was temping at 82. I will let you know if this slower water change process made any difference.
I've been buying shrimp in groups every other week and it's the shrimp that of been in the tank the longest that are dying. I and determined to get this right!! I want shrimp tanks everywhere.
 

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So I just finished a small water change, 3 gallons. Usually I do 3 buckets which is 6 gallons. I fed the water in with a small drip line at full flow. I also used 1 gallon distilled and 2 gallons regular tap water. I am on a well and I don't have a tds meter yet but was thinking my tds is too high. I also reduced the temperature to 78 because when I went to check my tank this morning it was temping at 82. I will let you know if this slower water change process made any difference.
I've been buying shrimp in groups every other week and it's the shrimp that of been in the tank the longest that are dying. I and determined to get this right!! I want shrimp tanks everywhere.
What's the age of your shrimp? Neocaridina only last 2 yrs max. Second when doing water changes you should try leaving cold water cold and not try to meet the temp of the tank. Using cold water or 4/5 degrees below tank temp send the shrimp into a dancing mode. With in the next few day some will molt. Proper diet is also a big key. Feed them protein once a week. This helps with breeding and later egg productivity.
 

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Not necessarily. I've done it on occasion to force molts, but it is always a gamble when doing a cold water change.

Let's say a shrimp recently molted. It takes a short time for the new shell to become hard, an then it takes time for the cells underneath to develop enough for the shell to be able to molt again.

By adding the cold water, it often is a trigger to molt. Similar to new water coming into a pond from a rain, etc. Now admittedly the water could have the same TDS, etc- but it is still cold and a trigger.

If the shrimp tries to molt again so soon after a last molt due to that trigger- it dies. Not in all occasions, but even a small percentage is enough to make sure my water is roughly the same temp when doing a wc.

Does this explain it a little better? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I came home from work today and found 3 dead shrimp :(. No idea what I'm doing wrong. I want my shrimp to molt on their own I don't want to force a molt. I bought them a new food thinking maybe they are not getting enought nutrients. It's called repashy shrimp soffule. Need to find way to make sure my shrimp are eating it and not my fish.
I am so sad I don't know what to do. Going to test gh and kh and compare to tank and I'll see from there.
 

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Never overfeed the tank, always use 1 rule, they must finish the food,
If there huge left over, you could blame the food, or increase longer frequency, for example feed once per 4 days

Never buy too much shrimp product, they could affect your shrimp in wrong way
Waste money, not help solve the problem

And never blame the wc, there could be more than 1 reason why the shrimp dead

If weekly wc could kill your ahrimp, then just change it into 2 week each wc,
With small toop up, maybe 50-150ml each days
 

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I had same issue, then I started using prime at water changes and no problems since. I tried jbl water conditioner for shrimps, it also did it's job.
Oh and also dont touch filter or substrate at wc. And don't over feed. Shrimps can live in planted tank without additional food
 

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A personal experience with a tank that was medicated, large water changes were done to remove the medication. A few mature RCS deaths were noted, the juveniles seemed to adapt better. During the medication period, temperatures were raised from 68-70 to the low 80's. The temperatures above the mid 70's seemed to be more stressful on the RCS, with more RCS deaths at the higher temperatures. Their metabolism may speed up and molting may increase. RCS do well with a sponge filter, either air driven or power head, and minimal water changes, just top off evaporated water.

Experiment with a 1 or 2 gallon jar. Use medium sized, aquarium sand as substrate. Place near a window for light, no heater. Fill with bottled water and let sit for a week. If possible purchase juvenile shrimp. A sponge filter is not necessary but will make the shrimp happier, without the filter the shrimp will reproduce slowly or not at all. A sponge filter, no carbon, can be hooked up to a small power head, such as a $12 top fin multi stage internal filter, use the power head only. This set up can be turned off, without concern of an ammonium spike.

In 6 months there will be enough shrimp, that the experiment can be widened to other parameters.
 
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