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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started my Monte Carlo carpet about 3 months ago, and I noticed a part of it growing taller than the rest, so I moved and replanted it to the midground, now it has taken off!! Can one of y'all please help me to ID what this hitchhiker plant is? I really like the way it has filled out but it could use a trim, and knowing what it truly is would give me a bit insight on how to trim it properly.

Thanks in advance for all replies.
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Plant Botany Organism Vegetation Terrestrial plant
 

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To trim it, just cut the longest tops off and replant them, whatever length you want. The longer the better but anything over 3"-4" should take right off.

You can leave the rooted stumps in place if you want to make more of it, 3"-4" is a good height to leave them. New stems will emerge from the stumps.

Thats a nice clean looking tank
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
To trim it, just cut the longest tops off and replant them, whatever length you want. The longer the better but anything over 3"-4" should take right off.

You can leave the rooted stumps in place if you want to make more of it, 3"-4" is a good height to leave them. New stems will emerge from the stumps.

Thats a nice clean looking tank
Thank you sir. That is tall praise coming from you, and I greatly appreciate it. As you can see, I am partial to the ''wild'' look :)
 

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It is NOT Hemianthus micranthemoides, a species that has not been seen alive since 1941 and is probably extinct. It is instead Hemianthus glomeratus, a related species common in much of Florida.
Honest question!

I know these things get named wrong in LFS all the time but how is this a thing?

Hemianthus micranthemoides - Tropica Aquarium Plants

Disregard! Aquasabi points this out correctly!
 

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Honest question!

I know these things get named wrong in LFS all the time but how is this a thing?

Hemianthus micranthemoides - Tropica Aquarium Plants
I'm really not sure how it happened in this instance, since the first reference I was able to find regarding micranthemoides in the hobby was from the 50s, I believe. It probably has to do with someone considering both micranthemoides and glomeratus as a single species in the past. It wouldn't be the only plant common in the south with a restricted tidal distribution in the north, as is the case for Bacopa innominata (the northern tidal form was previously called B. stragula). I doubt that's the case with the Hemianthus though, as the flower morphology is very different.
 
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