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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I am going to need to move my 60 gal cube to the other side of the living room, I am thinking of taking out almost all the water and saving it in 10 five gallon containers from home depot, but should I remove the plants also? it will be super heavy and I may have to use a dolly to move it base and all. Apprieciate any thoughts.
 

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Saving some of the water would be a good idea, but I don't think you need to save it all. Whatever you do though, I would empty it completely (substrate and all) before you move it. It's not worth the risk of doing otherwise.
 

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Depends on how many friends you can bribe with beer. :icon_smil Figure a gallon of water weighs about 8 lbs. How heavy do you think the tank can be and you and your buddies can still move it? Water sloshes around so take that into account as well. A buddy of mine and I moved my 45 with about 1/4 of the water in it. It wasn't light, but we aren't big guys either.

Instead of 10 5 gallon containers you may want to think about using a garbage can or some other large container. I use a 30 gallon garbage can with wheels for my water changes. You'd need a pump of some sort to get the water back into the tank.

David
 

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I'd leave in the substrate and the plants if it were < 20 gallons (I've done it before), but you'll absolutely want to kick yourself if the pressure from the substrate cracks your glass on such a large tank. If you can move the tank without taking it off the stand, without putting any odd pressure points on the bottom rim by lifting it, and without it sliding off the stand when you tilt the dolly, then you might be able to get away with it. Again though, it's risky and might not be worth it.
 

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I've had the problem where I take the water out, and some of the bigger rocks and driftwood, leave the plants in and move the tank (an acrylic tank, so much lighter) but then I put the water back in and all my plants are either uprooted, broken or moved around. (cept for the sword...) sooooo... it's actually a little easier to take the plants out and put 'em in the water to sit while you move it.... may not be necessary to take out the substrate, though. I don't have any big glass tanks, so I have no experience with cracking from pressure points, etc! :)
 

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I asked a friend of mine who used to maintain aquariums (27yrs)when he lived in CA. This was his response...hope it helps.

"When we moved aquariums in my service business (from across the room to across town), we removed as little water as needed. With across town moves that generally meant all. We would try and keep all substrate in tact open any canister filter to keep bio baterial colonies from dying. As for plants, I would disturb them as little as possible, so to not injure the roots, but you cannot leave the aquarium so much in tact that it is impossible to move or you risk breaking it to do so."
 

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I have done several 75% water changes with no bad effects on plants or fish. So, there really isn't a good reason to save the removed water, unless you are using reconstituted RO water, and even then it would be more beneficial to build up a supply of that water first, dump the tank water, and refill with new water. When I have moved my tank I have used the opportunity to do rescaping, get rid of unwanted plants, change substrate or add more substrate, and do a thorough cleaning of the tank and hardware. That way you kill two birds with one stone.
 

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I have moved a 90 and a 40 with about an inch of water above the substrate. I have removed the plants and not, you will have maintenance work either way. I have set up saw horses, moved the tank to them, then moved the stand got it in place and moved the tank. I have had no problems I would *expect* you to have similar results.
 

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IMHO this sorta thing isn't really a big deal. I've moved several tanks across rooms or into other rooms, including some bigger ones (55g, 60g, 125g). Pretty much just lowered the water to the point where I could easily move it. Never carried them, always just slid them - i.e. I left the tank and stand intact and just slid the whole unit. I even slid the 125g a few feet on my own with substrate (120lbs of sand) and a few inches of water in it. If you're leaving more than a few inches of water, I'd just leave all the livestock as-is. When I moved the 125, I had to take livestock out since there was only a few inches of water left (it was also a reef tank, with corals perched up high on rockwork - so I couldn't really leave them in.) On the other tanks, I left everything in.

If you find that you have to remove nearly all the water to make the move easy, then I'd definitely save some of it - but otherwise, it's just a big water change. Do the actual sliding slowly to help prevent disturbing the substrate.

If you have carpet or another "slippery" flooring it should be fine. If you don't, I'd just try to sneak something slippery underneath it to help it slide.
 

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HOLD ON EVERYONE!

Commercial stands are designed to bear a static load as in the weight doesnt shift. Those prebuilt stands will not handle the stress of a dynamic load well if at all, you are making it a dynamic load by moving or pushing it, the water sloshing around in it compounds this problem. You may get away with moving it by pushing it only to have the stand fail in the middle of the night weeks later.

Just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks everyone, Not a commercial stand, severly reinforced with simpson tyes all around. I will leave everything intact and slide it on the moving sliders,leaving about 10 gallons of water it.
 

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HOLD ON EVERYONE!

Commercial stands are designed to bear a static load as in the weight doesnt shift. Those prebuilt stands will not handle the stress of a dynamic load well if at all, you are making it a dynamic load by moving or pushing it, the water sloshing around in it compounds this problem. You may get away with moving it by pushing it only to have the stand fail in the middle of the night weeks later.

Just my 2 cents
We're not talking about racing a full tank across the floor here, but s-l-o-w-l-y sliding a nearly empty tank. There's nothing wrong with this, most (quality) commercial stands are incredibly overbuilt.
 
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