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My nano betta bowl

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Hello there! This is my first time posting to this forum! I have been experimenting with planted tanks for a few months now and this is my first attempt at a planted betta bowl. here are the specs

Lighting 27 watt 6500k PC Desk lamp

Filter Azoo Palm Filter

Substrate Pool sand

Co2 DIY Yeast bottle diffused through filter

Plants New Zealand sword / clippings from java fern

I appreciate any suggestions you can toss at me!

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you, know bettas jump right?

i had a female jump out of her cup (floating in a spawning tank) into the tank to mate with the male, then back in when she was done to run away from the male. your guy might for some reason jump and then he is history.

thats great for a bowl however, even has a filter.
 

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I appreciate any suggestions you can toss at me!

Is that one of those half-bowls that hang on the wall? It's too small for a betta. 2.5 gallons is the minimum I would use for a male betta. Mine have 5 gals each.

And yes, they jump. I just had one jump through the tiny opening next to his filter. Luckily I found him before he died.

They also need very warm temperatures and I see no mention of a heater?
 

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I think its nice. Even though it is a small bowl(or whatever) he took the plunge into getting it a filter which is definitely a plus. Its a very nice "tank" and want to see the finished product.

@[email protected] they only jump if its stressed out. Other than that its fine. My "shared tank" is open top(with lighting fixture above but more than enough room for it to jump) and my betta has not jumped. If he jumps check for diseases, parameters, and excess food.

pdc2104- They do require a heat source but I found that if they are in low to mid 60's they are fine. How I know is my cousin had a betta in a tank with no heater at all. It being about 5 years old it died though. It had lived its entire life in the water with no ill effects.
 

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Im not trying to fan any flames or anything but....... Betta's come from tiny ponds in asia and other places in the east that often experience drought contitions, and their pnds turn into mucky "holes" of muddy stagnant water. This is the reason they are called anabantids or "labrynth fish" they have a specialized organ called the Labrynth organ that allows them to breath air from the atmosphere.

So, while the very nice diggs that nanonoob has provided for his/her splendid fish it certainly is much better then the cups they are in at the fish store. Furthermore if you have issue with someone's fish lodging ethics pm them let's not internet argue, that fish will live just as long in it's current residence as it would in a 10g (or 2.5g) givin that the owner keeps up with maintinence and wc's.
 

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that fish will live just as long in it's current residence as it would in a 10g (or 2.5g) givin that the owner keeps up with maintinence and wc's.
sorry, but that is wrong. Walt Maurus, a betta expert, states in his book Bettas - A Complete Introduction that single bettas confined to smaller quarters will live a consederable amount shorter then those in larger community tanks. its stated to be because bettas in small containers get no excersize and sucumb to fatty degeneration.


however that said, im done. the bowl does look nice, it is not unreasonable; not optimal, but acceptable.
 

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Im not trying to fan any flames or anything but....... Betta's come from tiny ponds in asia and other places in the east that often experience drought contitions, and their pnds turn into mucky "holes" of muddy stagnant water. This is the reason they are called anabantids or "labrynth fish" they have a specialized organ called the Labrynth organ that allows them to breath air from the atmosphere.

So, while the very nice diggs that nanonoob has provided for his/her splendid fish it certainly is much better then the cups they are in at the fish store. Furthermore if you have issue with someone's fish lodging ethics pm them let's not internet argue, that fish will live just as long in it's current residence as it would in a 10g (or 2.5g) givin that the owner keeps up with maintinence and wc's.
More like puddles alongside the road. Other than that I agree with you 100%

Also I have a male Beta in an open top 29 and he gets constantly harassed by 1 0f three baby skunk botias and he has never jumped. I dont doubt that they might once and awhile but I doubt they are generally considered "jumpers".
 

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sorry, but that is wrong. Walt Maurus, a betta expert, states in his book Bettas - A Complete Introduction that single bettas confined to smaller quarters will live a consederable amount shorter then those in larger community tanks. its stated to be because bettas in small containers get no excersize and sucumb to fatty degeneration.


however that said, im done. the bowl does look nice, it is not unreasonable; not optimal, but acceptable.
Then by that argument would you say that they live longer say in a ten gallon aquarium than that in their natural habitat?
I am honestly curious.
 

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I would agree MOST fish live longer in the home aquarium than in nature.
In the home environment most people do the right thing for the fish ie:
fed regularly, water parameters, housing, compatibility etc...

In nature a lot of fish will encounter predators shortening a lifespan.
In nature these bettas will fight to the death no?

So I would say yes for the MOST part a betta would live longer in a ten gallon than in nature.
But heck I'm wrong about a lot of things:)

On topic:
Nice lil tank and betta:)
 

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Would Co2 in such a small tank be harmfull for the fish?


Other then that, the word that describes this is, "Cute". As my girlfriend would say. From myself, Well done.
 

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I am ont choosing a side here, but stating a fact I read in a book, saying that Betta's, being from old Siame or however you spell it, Old Thailand i'll say, since I'm half thai, are found in rice paddies also, and in flooded fields.

Now, i'm not going to say whch is better for the betta, in regards to tank size and this and that, but I will say that Betta's do not like current, so that particular filter might not be a good choice, being a HOB. The filter is a nice and thoughtfull thing to add, but maybe just not that type. Maybe and air-driven one or similar would be better for the fishes preference of slower/still waters.
 

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I would venture a guess on this one and say that the fish will probably (on average) live 4 to 7 times longer in an aquarium than it would in its natural habitat. Could it become obese and sedintary? Sure. Does it have to cope with dry seasons, food shortages, predation, and other environmental factors? No.


I understand your points. However, I think you know what I meant.
Not trying to be smart fshfanatic. What did you mean?

Nanonoob - That is a cool little setup, and I am sure that your betta loves it compared to the cup he was probably in prior to your bowl. Too bad we can't ask him :). One thing I would pay attention to is what Searun Simpson said about the current from the filter. I had a betta in a tank with a filter with a strong current a long time ago. When I had this setup, I noticed that the betta was somewhat restless and I think it was due to a high amount of current as SearunSimpson just pointed out. I never put two and two together until he brought it up just now.
 

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that filter is fine for bettas, just needs a current kill. just cut up a plastic bottle along the side to slide from the lip of the filter output to the water. that way the water wont splash and the current is much less.
 

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Regarding Walt Maurus and the longevity of bettas - he was referring to a university study where the autopsied fish that were kept in smaller containers were being compared to fish in larger tanks that were "exercised" daily by students that chased them around the tank. No mention was given to the life span of fish that were kept in smaller containers, or fish that were kept in larger tanks that were not "exercised" daily.

As far as temperature, Maurus states that bettas can be kept satisfactorily at 70 degrees, and that 74 is about right. He believes that they age faster at higher temperatures
 

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lower temperature does mean slower aging. thats do to fish being exothermic (cold blooded). so the lower the water temp, the lower the fishes temp, the slower the metabollic processes, the longer it takes for the fish to do stuff such as digest, grow, and age. its not the 70s temp that is the problem. but the temperature flucations. it is stressful for an animal that adapted to water which changes temperature very little in nature. to have up to a 10 degree day/night temp difference. excpecially since the fishes temperature changes with the water temperature.

as for the size, its acceptable; but not optimal (as i have already said). however, i dont reccomend you breed bettas in 2.5 gal. that is the bare minimum, plus you have no room to raise the fry. I kept my male and female in 2.5 gal and a 3 gal, and bred them in a 10 gal.
 
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