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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help whats wrong with my Rasboras? This is the second time a Rasboaras did this on me. Since the video I obviously removed the drunk fish..
Parameters are good as I just checked them, all other fish are also looking healthy.. Organ Failure?


 

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I hate to say it, but it looks like columnaris. It may already have spread to other fish but not presenting itself yet. Remove affected fish and I'm not 100% but I think kanaplex and furizon is the treatment. It's been a long time since I've dealt with treating fish so I've forgotten. I'm hoping someone else will chime in with better information and a more positive diagnosis. I'm sorry you're going through this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Spoke to my fish shop and they told me its not sickness but co2 poising. They told me to reduce the co2 to increase ph. With co2 ph is 6.6 and when off it jumps to 7.2. Thats a 0.6 jump which is not healthy and stresses the fish apparently. I was told to leave lights off for a day and turn off co2 for a day also then try keep ph with co2 on to around 7.0.. what do you think?
 

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If the fish wasn't used to the jump maybe, I just know a drop of 1 us somewhat standard now, but maybe there's a different water issue that makes the drop more dangerous? I don't know, it just doesn't seem like that would be the problem. I've had high tech tanks that I maintained (not my own) that had drops of 1.2 and fish were healthy and spawning. You could try his suggestion and seek how they do.
 

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Spoke to my fish shop and they told me its not sickness but co2 poising. They told me to reduce the co2 to increase ph. With co2 ph is 6.6 and when off it jumps to 7.2. Thats a 0.6 jump which is not healthy and stresses the fish apparently. I was told to leave lights off for a day and turn off co2 for a day also then try keep ph with co2 on to around 7.0.. what do you think?
I am tagging someone who may be able to confirm or eliminate the Co2 diagnosis. @Deanna
 

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IMO, your LFS does not understand the dynamics of a high-tech tank and are pointing you in the wrong direction. Most fish are unaffected by pH drops even up into the 1.5 point-drop area IF the drop is caused by CO2. If it is not caused by CO2, it could be a problem but mainly as an indicator of other problems, such as osmotic shock due to more significant parameter changes. In particular, I have found Rasboras to be very robust. In fact, Rasboras tend to prefer acidic water. If it were CO2 overdosing, the first and, probably, last behavior you would see would be the fish desperately gasping for oxygen at the surface. A TDS meter (inexpensive) might be useful in determining if your water chemistry is stable.

You might also want to think back to try to recall if any of the basic environmental variables have been aberrant, such as temperature, dramatic water changes (TDS meters very useful here), ammonia issues, etc. Any of these can induce stress. Basically, I think I'd look to the disease aspect as the culprit, possibly resulting from stress and/or worsened by it, i.e.; try some of the ideas mentioned by other posters for disease treatment, although I haven't looked too deeply at your specific issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My TDS is at 180.. temp is at a constant 24c.. i thought it would be the co2 drop effecting the white on the side of the fish by stress.. very much different opinions here some say its co2 intoxication and some say deciese.. really dont know what my next step is..

Just tested it this morning and

Gh 8
PH 7.2
TDS 205

Will continue monitoring throughout the day. Shall I put lights and Co2 on or keep them on to try save the fish (depening on if its co2 intoxication)
 

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The symptoms you are describing are not associated with CO2 intoxication. If CO2 was involved, I would expect to primarily see gasping at the surface and, possibly, lethargic behavior. CO2 and oxygen are mutually independent, i.e.; one does not crowd-out the other. In any tank, we should assure adequate O2 and this becomes more important in a CO2 injected tank and/or a heavily stocked tank. The best way to assure this is to have as much rippling of the surface as possible, without breaking the surface. However, again, you are not describing typical CO2 overdose symptoms.

To me, your symptom descriptions indicate either disease or the result of an ammonia spike. An ammonia spike can cause internal organ and neurological damage and can also cause burning (whitening) of the skin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No ammonia as its 0ppm.. Did you see the video in the first post? the fish was swimming upside down.. Could that be stress or organ failure maybe?
Im at a loss.. If its disease how come only the rasboras are affected?

1028776

Light went on and found it swimming like this.. I think im just gonna remove them
 

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Yes, the swim bladder is an organ that can be damaged.

Keep in mind that your ammonia reading is a reading at one point in time. You cannot record an ammonia spike (unless you happen to be lucky enough to catch it) but, if your tank is established and being well run, without drastic disruptions, a dangerous ammonia spike is unlikely. Additionally, the problem would only occur when pH is above ~7, with increasing potential danger as pH moves higher.
 
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No ammonia as its 0ppm.. Did you see the video in the first post? the fish was swimming upside down.. Could that be stress or organ failure maybe?
Im at a loss.. If its disease how come only the rasboras are affected?
Organ failure occurs with many conditions prior to death-- it does not point to any one cause.
The spiraling, weak swimming of the fish is a common pattern before death as well.
I wanted to eliminate the possibility of Co2 toxicity before saying that it is caused from disease. I have never seen CO2 toxicity so needed to have @Deanna help here.
This looks like Columnaris- a common Gram negative bacterial infection in aquarium. There are 4 different strains that have different symptoms. If your fish are dying one at a time over a period of time it is most likely the slower developing strain. It takes the weakest fish in a tank first and you often see one variety of fish be affected as the disease slowely weakens the stronger.
Treat with nitrofurazone (active ingredients in API Furan 2) and kanamycin (Seachem Kanaplex).
 
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