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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found this drift wood on the bank of a lake in near by forest (temperate forest). It has really nice twisting, anyways half portion of it was very well dried and another half portion is not so dried. It fits well for my 29G tank. my question is is this a hard wood or soft wood, wood has some cracks, weighs average neither too low nor too heavy. bottom portion (white portion in image) looks denser compared to tip. can i use this wood for aquarium ? most fishes I am planning to keep are Tetras who like acidic water.
 

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I've used wood I found many times... I just try to boil it and after scrub it with 50/50 bleach h2o2. That piece might be hard to boil so.maybe just get boiling water and scrub it in the bath. After that usually these pieces float..so you have to anchor it somehow.

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to me it looks soft but really only you can tell :l its not a take a pic and we can see kind of thing its also a feeling physically (like with your hand touch it)

also what kind of tetras?
if neon tetras; neon tetras tend to occupy streams amidst forests -- specifically clear-water settings. The water in their natural environments usually is a tad acidic and often is brownish in coloration because of the presence of decaying organic substances that cause the acidity. However, the water in their habitats isn't always dark; even with tannins it sometimes appears totally clear.
Optimal aquarium temperatures for neon tetras are between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit. Rainwater is perfect for keeping neon tetras in strong working order -- these fish like pH levels between 5.5 and 6.2, though anywhere between 5.5 and 6.8 is appropriate. Hardness of between 2 and 10 degrees dH is recommended. Although soft water is undoubtedly favorable for neon tetras, these fish can manage in medium-hard water if it is of a high grade. While they can handle hardish water for minimal spans of time, extended exposure to hard water could have negative effects on their life spans. For reproductive purposes, neon tetras require pH levels of no more than 6.5, also with extremely minimal hardness.
Neon tetras easily pick up on any shifts in their water, so always make any adjustments in a gradual and measured manner -- you definitely don't want to shock the poor things out of nowhere, after all. This includes water temperature -- make sure the temperature is steady, regardless of where in the appropriate range you keep it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
to me it looks soft but really only you can tell :l its not a take a pic and we can see kind of thing its also a feeling physically (like with your hand touch it)

also what kind of tetras?
if neon tetras; neon tetras tend to occupy streams amidst forests -- specifically clear-water settings. The water in their natural environments usually is a tad acidic and often is brownish in coloration because of the presence of decaying organic substances that cause the acidity. However, the water in their habitats isn't always dark; even with tannins it sometimes appears totally clear.
Optimal aquarium temperatures for neon tetras are between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit. Rainwater is perfect for keeping neon tetras in strong working order -- these fish like pH levels between 5.5 and 6.2, though anywhere between 5.5 and 6.8 is appropriate. Hardness of between 2 and 10 degrees dH is recommended. Although soft water is undoubtedly favorable for neon tetras, these fish can manage in medium-hard water if it is of a high grade. While they can handle hardish water for minimal spans of time, extended exposure to hard water could have negative effects on their life spans. For reproductive purposes, neon tetras require pH levels of no more than 6.5, also with extremely minimal hardness.
Neon tetras easily pick up on any shifts in their water, so always make any adjustments in a gradual and measured manner -- you definitely don't want to shock the poor things out of nowhere, after all. This includes water temperature -- make sure the temperature is steady, regardless of where in the appropriate range you keep it.
Thank you for your reply, That's true only I can tell whether it is soft wood or hard wood. I have neaon tetra but I am building new aquascape my neon tetras will be moved to my home pond, i am planing to have some 12 Rummynose tetras and 6 Emperor tetras after my new aquascape starts to come live. I have big rain water collecting tank in my home so I have no problem of finding acidic water. I'll dip the driftwood 1 week in water so that it can release its toxins and sun dry it for another week. but can I use SOFT wood ?

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I've used wood I found many times... I just try to boil it and after scrub it with 50/50 bleach h2o2. That piece might be hard to boil so.maybe just get boiling water and scrub it in the bath. After that usually these pieces float..so you have to anchor it somehow.

Sent from my SM-J120W using Tapatalk
Thank you for your replay, I am planing to do the same.
 

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Soft wood is usually not used (such as elm tree, pines, cedars) due to the fact that in the aquarium they decay super fast... within weeks or days sometimes.. hardwoods are the opposite... and some other reasons but if its soft don't use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Soft wood is usually not used (such as elm tree, pines, cedars) due to the fact that in the aquarium they decay super fast... within weeks or days sometimes.. hardwoods are the opposite... and some other reasons but if its soft don't use it.
oh I am pretty sure that my wood is not softwood then..its was in the lake for a while now so its not rotten.
 
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