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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Within a couple of weeks I will be getting a 68 gallon 120cm tank. I will migrate my 25 gallon to it.

The problem is that over the past month I have been fighting a battle with BBA. I have a large piece of wood in my tank and a lot of rocks, none of which have BBA on them. It is mostly on my Buce and Java ferns. I have turned up my CO2, been diligent with water changes, and pulled out the Buce to treat with Excell. The ferns I have mostly trimmed. So far I have pretty much broken even but the BBA persists. The BBA on my Buce did largely die of but the Buce has suffered from the treatment.

Aside from my treatment regimen I am mostly concerned about not seeding BBA to my new tank from my old. I have considered everything from just going for it to only moving over livestock and just re-scaping with new wood, rocks, and plants. I hate to waste the great piece of wood and the plants but will if necessary. I had also planned on seeding the bacteria on the biomedia from my existing filter to my new filter. How likely is it that BBA would come along with my filter?

So my question is what is safest plan of action? I do realize that even if I start the new tank from scratch I will need to know how to best keep BBA under control.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's impossible to prevent BBA from starting if the conditions are right. The spores are everywhere and they will turn into full-blown algae if a threshold is breached. You need to maintain the proper light and uptake (and/or removal) of organic waste to prevent BBA.
Thanks. I know that regardless of my choices I will need to get a handle on tank balance for hygiene, chemistry and light. I am trying to do that now and do see some improvement. Actually I thought that I was all along until the BBA popped up.

I am just wondering if there is any value to only bringing over livestock or if I might as well bring over whatever looks good and cull affected plants/leaves.

I am hoping that someone here has experience with this kind of situation. I assume that anyone who retires a tank for a new one faces some similar choices.

Best,
Paul
 

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So what does your clean up crew look like?

and how about your stocking? if you move them over to the larger tank it will probably decrease organics concentration and will help you fight off the BBA?

I have 2 amano/10 gallon and they don't eat the bba until after I blast it with h2o2 and turns white


I think you're on the right track to decrease BBA, I think staying on top of the water changes is the main thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So what does your clean up crew look like?

and how about your stocking? if you move them over to the larger tank it will probably decrease organics concentration and will help you fight off the BBA?

I have 2 amano/10 gallon and they don't eat the bba until after I blast it with h2o2 and turns white


I think you're on the right track to decrease BBA, I think staying on top of the water changes is the main thing.
Thanks for the input. It is appreciated.

I have about 8 nerites, probably 15 (and now multiplying) cherry shrimp, three ottos and about 12 pygmy corys. I only have 6 other tetras as I have been holding off on schooling fish until the large tank arrives. I am not sure that anything eats BBA until it dies!

Good point about the organics. I could easily leave my old substrate behind. That would probably check that box. I plan to scape my new tank for better flow and easier access to the back of the tank.
 

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It is the single worst algae to get rid of in this hobby. I could link you thread after thread over the time I've been here regarding it's preferred light, prevention, eradication (with mostly at best partially successful attempts at eradicating it long-term) and fauna that the internet says eats it that don't in OP's tank. I won't have a lot to offer that you probably haven't already read or certainly can't find. But I can say that I would and do move stuff with BBA on it to new tanks/tanks without BBA all the time. It doesn't matter. I have a high tech tank I will occasionally move Anubias to with BBA just to get rid of it. It turns red and shrimp and snails eat it, and would do so a little slower without their help I feel sure. But there's not a single worry that tank will "catch" it as if it's some type of STD.
@Asteroid is dead on. If dissolving organics and a lack of rapidly growing plants (even other algae) aren't uptaking it, BBA is going to. *Squeaky clean* sponges, gravel, filters, water column is where you start. I'm an advocate of killing what I can see, though others aren't. I have a spray bottle I fill with Excel (use a mask when doing this) or peroxide and spray it down for 1 minute for Excel and until bubbling stops after spraying or 5 minutes tops for H2O2. That will kill it back enough to turn it into food if you have snails -and you should.

Wish you luck with it. But you can move your existing clippings and such without worry that it will be the cause of BBA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It is the single worst algae to get rid of in this hobby. I could link you thread after thread over the time I've been here regarding it's preferred light, prevention, eradication (with mostly at best partially successful attempts at eradicating it long-term) and fauna that the internet says eats it that don't in OP's tank. I won't have a lot to offer that you probably haven't already read or certainly can't find. But I can say that I would and do move stuff with BBA on it to new tanks/tanks without BBA all the time. It doesn't matter. I have a high tech tank I will occasionally move Anubias to with BBA just to get rid of it. It turns red and shrimp and snails eat it, and would do so a little slower without their help I feel sure. But there's not a single worry that tank will "catch" it as if it's some type of STD.

@Asteroid is dead on. If dissolving organics and a lack of rapidly growing plants (even other algae) aren't uptaking it, BBA is going to. *Squeaky clean* sponges, gravel, filters, water column is where you start. I'm an advocate of killing what I can see, though others aren't. I have a spray bottle I fill with Excel (use a mask when doing this) or peroxide and spray it down for 1 minute for Excel and until bubbling stops after spraying or 5 minutes tops for H2O2. That will kill it back enough to turn it into food if you have snails -and you should.

Wish you luck with it. But you can move your existing clippings and such without worry that it will be the cause of BBA.
Thanks. That was very helpful and reassuring.

Killing BBA is sort of a hobby within a hobby!
 
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