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So I have a low, low tech 10 gallon tank with Frogbit doing great. This tank has pest snails, ramshorn snails, shrimp and small community fish. Has some Java fern also doing great.

I want to move some Frogbit over to the 75 gallon, non planted tank, all fake. What are my chances of having no snails as hitch hikers?

How best could I prepare for this? The 75 gallon has about 12 crawdads that I'm sure would hunt them down.

Thoughts?

Thanks.
 

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Really high chance you'll have eggs or baby snails, almost guaranteed. As you mentioned, the crayfish will consume the snails, but only after they reach a certain size. You will continually have a baby snail population--which is fine too, they help clean up debris and leftover food.

But if you don't want them then you could do a diluted solution dip or soak to reduce your chances of transferring hitchhikers.

I recommend you do this OUTSIDE of any tanks, in a pan or container that you can dump when you are done. Doing this in your tank would be a disaster to say the least.

Aquarium Salt - 1 cup per gallon is a good rule of thumb. DO NOT USE table salt or iodized salt! This has other chemicals and preservatives that could damage your plants. Dip for 20-30 seconds keeping the roots out of the salt water solution. DO NOT SOAK YOUR PLANTS USING THIS METHOD!

Aluminum sulfate AKA Alum - Dissolve 1-3 tablespoons per gallon of water and soak the plants for at least 2-3 hours in stronger solutions, or up to 24 hours in milder solutions. This will kill the snails and often the egg sacs with varying results based on time/dilution.

Hydrogen Peroxide - the 3% stuff is fine. Mix 3 parts water with 1 part Hydrogen Peroxide and you have a very mild and diluted solution. This is more effective on organics like fungi and algae. It is less effective on eggs and snails, but worth a mention.

With all of these methods, you should remember to rinse off your plants with freshwater before transferring them to the new tank.

Experienced hobbyists have been known to use Potassium Permanganate and Bleach. These are highly effective as well but there are serious risks when using these chemicals so I would recommend using the milder ones. If you want to use these stronger ones, you should do a lot of research as mixing them improperly might be life-threatening.

Good luck!
 

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I would be very, very careful about using KMnO4 with frogbit, as it is really tough on roots. I have only used it by holding the plant by the roots and dipping only the stems/leaves. i’m not sure how you could do that with Frogbit. Also, KMnO4 is quite hazardous. Definitely store it where there is no chance of children getting to it. If kids saw you use it and admired the beautiful purple-pink color, they might want to try it in their own, or—heavens forfend—drink it because it looks kind of like KoolAid.

The two times I have tried bleach, I bleached everything but the snail eggs, I guess, because I got a couple of snails that I couldn’t identify. So, anecdotally, I don;t recommend it.

I sounds like you’ve already moved the Frogbit and I hope you won’t have trouble. If you don’t, it could be just luck, or it could be because different species of snails lay their eggs in different places; Mystery Snails lay eggs right at/above the water line and Nerites lay them on every solid surface they can find.
 
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