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We are remodeling our kitchen/living room and replacing floors which means my 55 gallon freshwater planted tank with tetras and shrimp needs to be taken down at least while they do the living room floors, painting, and lights. I have had fishtanks for the past 20 years, and this tank has been up for 10, but now I have two young kids and we’ve already had to deal with major water damage in our kitchen from our dishwasher and refrigerator. I am struggling with a decision to potentially get rid of the tank, downsize to a smaller tank, get an acrylic tank, or just take it down and set it back up when they are done.

I’ve taken down tanks before so I know the drill, buckets, keep some filter, substrate, and water to help prevent cycling. But I am worried about how fast the contractors can do the work and how long the fish will have to be in those buckets.

I’m also worried about my kids around a glass tank my Eheim canister filter hoses being yanked on and ensuing flood damage. Of course they’ve had 7 and 5 years to do that and haven’t. My husband would like me to just get rid of the tank so I don’t have to deal with cleaning it and we don’t have to worry about it when we go on vacation. But I love my tank and I have a lot of sunk costs, including a $100 gallon of dechlorinator 😂

What would you do?
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I am going through a similar situation . I would try to find out how long the contractors think it will take to do room where tank is . If not long the fish will be fine in a bucket with a filter or air stone for a while . If it's going to take a long while set the tank back up temporarily and run till room is finished . Or put them in another tank till room finished . Mine was a 30 long so I was able to drain it down a good ways and move it to the next room and refill and restart it there . Once my new tank comes in I will move all the stuff and fish to it . I had to move it to redo the floors in the room where it was so I figured it was a good time to get a new tank....lol
 

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I am going through a similar situation . I would try to find out how long the contractors think it will take to do room where tank is . If not long the fish will be fine in a bucket with a filter or air stone for a while . If it's going to take a long while set the tank back up temporarily and run till room is finished . Or put them in another tank till room finished . Mine was a 30 long so I was able to drain it down a good ways and move it to the next room and refill and restart it there . Once my new tank comes in I will move all the stuff and fish to it . I had to move it to redo the floors in the room where it was so I figured it was a good time to get a new tank....lol
Unfortunately there no other location I could set up this 48” tank in my small house... but maybe I could get a smaller tank... I was toying around with the idea of reducing the tank size to a 29 gallon... I have 5 rummy nose, 5 black skirts, 2 lemons, 2 rasboras and lots of cherry shrimp. Probably not a good idea, but thought about it...
 

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I think a 29 gallon tank could work. Can you move the tank to a basement, garage, outside, or anywhere else at all? You could grab one of those 17 gallon buckets that walmart sells, and home the fish there while the construction finishes. Depending on where you put the tank, you might not even have to move the shrimp...
 

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I think a 29 gallon tank could work. Can you move the tank to a basement, garage, outside, or anywhere else at all? You could grab one of those 17 gallon buckets that walmart sells, and home the fish there while the construction finishes. Depending on where you put the tank, you might not even have to move the shrimp...
Our family of 4 lives in a 1100 sqft townhouse, no garage. During the renovation they will be working 400 sqft, so space is at a premium. I don’t think I could put they fish outside, at least not for more than a day. My thought was 8 buckets for a day would work but if the construction of the living room floor goes on longer than a day I would be pushing it.
 

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I've done fish in buckets with battery air pump makeshift sponge filters for a few days when I updated my house with very few losses, just make sure the cover of them bucket is cracked a little and do water changes on the buckets. If you have the ability to grab a little betta bowl heater for each bucket that would be extra and probably keep your fish from getting too stressed from temp changes. As for plants, a couple days without care shouldn't be too much of a problem as long as they are healthy, they might not be happy, but they should spring back. As for downgrading- that's between you AMD your family and what works best for everybody. Me, personally, I told my hubby to get lost when he started getting concerned when I started my hobby tank after I retired lol, so I'm not really one to listen to 😁
 

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I've done fish in buckets with battery air pump makeshift sponge filters for a few days when I updated my house with very few losses, just make sure the cover of them bucket is cracked a little and do water changes on the buckets. If you have the ability to grab a little betta bowl heater for each bucket that would be extra and probably keep your fish from getting too stressed from temp changes. As for plants, a couple days without care shouldn't be too much of a problem as long as they are healthy, they might not be happy, but they should spring back. As for downgrading- that's between you AMD your family and what works best for everybody. Me, personally, I told my hubby to get lost when he started getting concerned when I started my hobby tank after I retired lol, so I'm not really one to listen to 😁
I like your attitude 😉😂
 

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I think you'd benefit from reading the above. Fish are far hardier than we think they are. That being said, I don't know where you're located geographically. The weather's pretty nice in SoCal right now so I could start tubbing this week if I wanted.

You could drain the tank, put the shrimp in one large bucket, the fish in another large bucket, and then wait until construction is done. Keep the tank slightly wet (enough to maintain plant life), and move it somewhere shady. Once construction is over, move it back. I'll warn you now: this is a multiple person job. Tanks with even a small amount of water get exponentially heavy.
 

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I think you'd benefit from reading the above. Fish are far hardier than we think they are. That being said, I don't know where you're located geographically. The weather's pretty nice in SoCal right now so I could start tubbing this week if I wanted.

You could drain the tank, put the shrimp in one large bucket, the fish in another large bucket, and then wait until construction is done. Keep the tank slightly wet (enough to maintain plant life), and move it somewhere shady. Once construction is over, move it back. I'll warn you now: this is a multiple person job. Tanks with even a small amount of water get exponentially heavy.
I am in Virginia the weather here is anywhere between 30 and 90° in April 😂
 

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Im with Ichthy, the easiest solution to my mind is the big blue tub from Walmart. Sponge filter with airpump, maybe a clip on plant light. I wouldnt worry about heating if the tub was indoors. Minimal expenditure. I would not want to set up a completely new tank, to me thats doubling the work, not less.
Every contracting job I've ever had done has taken weeks, not days, so I dont think I'd depend on contractors working fast in making my choice.

A lot of separate buckets with small kids is just waiting for a bucket to get kicked or moved or.. you know how they are, inventive! A big tub is also more stable and easier to monitor for water change. You could drain a good amount of your water straight to the tub, plants into the tub, fish and shrimp into the tub. You've seen how breeders do their tanks, no substrate on the bottom. Easy to vacuum waste in your water changes. As long as the fish have cover and food, they're happy. The opaque sides would probably make them feel more secure than in a tank. Looking nice is our requirement, not theirs :p Id plop some of the filter media in as well, straight on the bottom of the tub. The shrimp will live and hang out on that, as well as preserving some of the bacteria to cycle. As long as the plants get some light and liquid ferts, most will probably live.

The tub option gives you at least a couple weeks for contractors to finish, repainting of the room if you're doing that, moving the big tank back, rescape it/reset things back up to your liking, and having a million other demands on your time.

Good luck!
 

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Good point, I am feeling much more confident that the tub option is best. I am going to get a sponge filter to get it started so it’s loaded with good bacteria before everyone moves to the tub.
 
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