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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm studying for the GRE, and I forgot how absolutely boring vocabulary studying was. It was fun when I was doing it for the spelling bees in 5-8th grade, but like...now it's kinda a lot. I've found that I like to "passively study", or in other words, not realize that I'm studying when oops, I'm studying (case in point: Ecology of the Planted Aquarium by Walstad. Had no problem reading it. Then oops, it's basically a textbook). I'm still studying and haven't scheduled a GRE test date, so I'm in no rush for words...yet. But I still feel like studying as much as I can right now, can only help me.

So that being said, what's an interesting word that you've come across lately? What's the story behind it? The definition of the word? Ideally it wouldn't be words like hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia (fear of very long words), or pneumoultramicroscopicsilicovolcaniosis (basically: lung laceration due to inhalation of volcanic or otherwise fine dust), since those words are most likely never going to be on the GRE. But go wild!

Examples of words that I've just come across lately: inchoate (just begun), desultory (lacking a plan), and truculent (aggressive)...mostly from the GRE study book...
 

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I don't know about fancy words, but I can definitely commiserate about taking the GRE! I had so much anxiety about taking it, even though test taking has always been a strong suit of mine. Luckily I had a mini breakdown a couple days before the actual test, so when I actually had to take it my nerves were spent and I couldn't feel anything anymore when I actually had to sit the test. (That sound bad, and it is, but is much better than being nervous!) The worry was such a waste - my department mostly picks grad students because they have an advisor that wants them/can fund them, which I had, so the required GRE scores are pretty modest. It was fine! Still, I never want to do it again!

That said, I think you get the biggest ROI studying for the math and writing portions. The math is pretty easy, but some of the concepts were stuff I hadn't thought about in 10 years. YMMV, obviously.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't know about fancy words, but I can definitely commiserate about taking the GRE! I had so much anxiety about taking it, even though test taking has always been a strong suit of mine. Luckily I had a mini breakdown a couple days before the actual test, so when I actually had to take it my nerves were spent and I couldn't feel anything anymore when I actually had to sit the test. (That sound bad, and it is, but is much better than being nervous!) The worry was such a waste - my department mostly picks grad students because they have an advisor that wants them/can fund them, which I had, so the required GRE scores are pretty modest. It was fine! Still, I never want to do it again!

That said, I think you get the biggest ROI studying for the math and writing portions. The math is pretty easy, but some of the concepts were stuff I hadn't thought about in 10 years. YMMV, obviously.
So the funny thing, is that I can handle the math portion alright. But I'm really gunning for a 346 (170 on verbal, 170 on math, and 6 on writing). I'd take like 323 (160 on verbal/math, and 3 on writing).

I know I want the GRE since I'm looking at grad schools. My GPA in college was really really low (as in, more 2.0 than 3.0) due to an abusive relationship plus a bad major decision, so I'm hoping that if I can show admissions committees "hey! I'm 'better' now, I have all of these high scores on standardized tests and glowing recommendation letters and professors at your institution who want me, I only have this low GPA because of a trash relationship", they'll at least overlook the worst of the grades.
 
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