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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering if Monte Carlo has some conditions that make it better for submersion after emerged growth, so that it doesn't have to melt at all. I have 3 baskets with Monte Carlo that I immersed in my plant tank and all three have only halfway melted and stayed steady at half green, half melted. - so I can assume it didn't have to melt - but why? Would ferts, maturity, or potting medium make them more durable? I'd love to figure this out because it means that I can submerge my carpet tank without worrying about melting at all lol. Has anyone got a method for submerging MC without the melting? Thanks for reading :)


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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You might be right - it could have melted in different stages and I just didn't notice. Been underwater for about a month. Should I remove the melted parts or is that needed for new growth?
 

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I've only been growing Monte Carlo for about a year and change, but I have it in a tank that used to run co2, then converted it to non-co2, and in a second tank that does run co2. The plant tends to have slightly larger bright lime green leaves when it has co2. When there's no co2, they tend to get smaller with a darker green color. The growth difference between co2 and non-co2 is shocking. The non-co2 tank can go almost half a year without needing trimming whereas the co2 tank is more lush and happy looking, and needs more frequent trimming almost monthly. In both cases imo, soil is a must. I tried growing it in some spots as an epiphyte, but it struggles. There doesn't seem to be enough nutrients in the water column for me to grow it well without using soil. If you have access to aqua soil, or some other sort of substrate with nutrients, I would suggest experimenting with one of your pots, removing the rock wool, and gently go through the plant and separate it out into pieces. It should be able to break apart into individual stems with some roots on each piece. I would get rid of the melted portions, and just keep the healthiest looking growth. And then plant the pieces close to each other and deep enough that just some of the leaves are popping out. If it manages to spring back, I agree with minorhero that co2 will really be helpful, but not a must.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Is it possible that it just needs to fully melt off and then I can transplant when it is at its healthiest? I'm thinking of using these later to fill in gaps after I flood my dry start carpet. Thanks, I didn't know that was rockwool, btw.
 

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You could always wait but getting it out of the rock wool and beginning to feed the plant the way it prefers, through its roots in a substrate, will give it the best chances at it multiplying. You won’t notice it immediately, it takes about a week for it to settle in and grow its roots in a bit to then start noticing new leaf growth. You can even do it in a little bowl in your tank filled with some aquasoil. You don’t have to commit to planting it somewhere permanent. You may have some trouble going back to the dry start method though. The plant looks like it was grown immersed, out of water before you bought it. Then You put it in water, so it had to adjust to in-water growth, submerged, which is why you probably had melting along with no soil. Trying the dry start method after that will make it have to do the transition all over again. I recently transplanted a pad of Monte Carlo I had grown into a new tank to make a carpet and I can send a couple photos of the process it that helps. No dry start was needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You could always wait but getting it out of the rock wool and beginning to feed the plant the way it prefers, through its roots in a substrate, will give it the best chances at it multiplying. You won’t notice it immediately, it takes about a week for it to settle in and grow its roots in a bit to then start noticing new leaf growth. You can even do it in a little bowl in your tank filled with some aquasoil. You don’t have to commit to planting it somewhere permanent. You may have some trouble going back to the dry start method though. The plant looks like it was grown immersed, out of water before you bought it. Then You put it in water, so it had to adjust to in-water growth, submerged, which is why you probably had melting along with no soil. Trying the dry start method after that will make it have to do the transition all over again. I recently transplanted a pad of Monte Carlo I had grown into a new tank to make a carpet and I can send a couple photos of the process it that helps. No dry start was needed.
Sure it would be cool to see them and how they grew in :)
 

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Sure it would be cool to see them and how they grew in :)
So in the first tank, I was super precious about it because I only had two tissue culture pots of it, so I basically planted each individual stem over the course of two days... In between days, I sprayed it down and covered it so it stayed humid, then filled the tank with water at the end of day two. You can see that ocd process in image 1. Then a year later I took out a chunk of the carpet which you can see in image 2, and basically broke it into small clusters much more lazily, and put it in the second tank. In image two, the second to last visual is right after I planted it, and then the very last visual is today, which is about two weeks later to give you an idea.

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I just got some monte carlo. It has been planted for about a month now and to my surprise, no die back yet! I don't know what I did or how i did it. The best I can say is that it was a tissue culture plant. I don't have any co2 injections either. I have a nutrient riched substrate and have never dosed any ferts in the tank either. Heres a picture, its begining to carpet. I assume that if it had co2 it would be a carpet much faster:
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I just got some monte carlo. It has been planted for about a month now and to my surprise, no die back yet! I don't know what I did or how i did it. The best I can say is that it was a tissue culture plant. I don't have any co2 injections either. I have a nutrient riched substrate and have never dosed any ferts in the tank either. Heres a picture, its begining to carpet. I assume that if it had co2 it would be a carpet much faster:
View attachment 1025891
Yeah, I personally love tissue cultures, you get a lot of plants for the money and they just seem to adapt easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So in the first tank, I was super precious about it because I only had two tissue culture pots of it, so I basically planted each individual stem over the course of two days... In between days, I sprayed it down and covered it so it stayed humid, then filled the tank with water at the end of day two. You can see that ocd process in image 1. Then a year later I took out a chunk of the carpet which you can see in image 2, and basically broke it into small clusters much more lazily, and put it in the second tank. In image two, the second to last visual is right after I planted it, and then the very last visual is today, which is about two weeks later to give you an idea.

View attachment 1025890 View attachment 1025889
That looks great! Cool that you could use it for both tanks! Did you submerge the second tank MC right away or did you wait for it to spread first?
 

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That looks great! Cool that you could use it for both tanks! Did you submerge the second tank MC right away or did you wait for it to spread first?
The first tank I only waited a day because I couldn’t finish it that night haha. So I wouldn’t call that dry-start. Usually dry start takes a month or two. The second tank was already submerged for 4 weeks before I decided to add the mc there, so I did it while there was water in the tank. I do use co2 so that helps it grow faster, but IMO, dry start is more work than it’s worth unless it’s going to be a high flow tank or you plan to stock it with fish that like to mess with the substrate and you risk the plants being uprooted before they get a chance to grow in better. Any yes, you can propagate pretty much all aquarium plants to make more!
 
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