The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to simplify my life. Like many others, I have acquired a ton of equipment that now goes unused. I am on the brink of getting rid of my tanks altogether.

What would a minimalists tank look like? Minimal equipment, minimal maintenance.

Is it even possible to fit a nice tank, quarantine/hospital tank, all the components and products into a nice looking stand?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,423 Posts
I am trying to simplify my life. Like many others, I have acquired a ton of equipment that now goes unused. I am on the brink of getting rid of my tanks altogether.

What would a minimalists tank look like? Minimal equipment, minimal maintenance.

Is it even possible to fit a nice tank, quarantine/hospital tank, all the components and products into a nice looking stand?
Yours is a very interesting question - means so many different things to so many different people.

I wish I had some pics or links to show what I think a minimalist aquatic approach is, but I don't, at the moment.

But I have seen many beautiful tanks, of different sizes, with nothing more than a bit of sand substrate, a small but well formed piece of driftwood, with perhaps an Anubia or 2, or 3, and maybe just 3 or 4 unique fish.
A small heater & filter, a wc every once in a while, light feeding & tank cleansing, crystal clear water - and wow - what an effect !

Let us know some more of your own personal thoughts on what 'minimalist' means to you, and perhaps we can be more helpful, or enlightening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,423 Posts
This is not by any means 'minimalist' by any description, but it's my ongoing effort to bring things down to their lowest possible level, while still looking after the discus' needs, in a planted environment, as best as is possible for me:

http://s1105.photobucket.com/albums/h357/discuspaul/lolliblues2

If you wish, you could check out my 'Beginner's Guide to Discus' in the fish section - the first & only sticky, and you'll see a pic, somewhere near the end, of a pair of discus in a tank with nothing more than one piece of driftwood & a little sand - there's nothing more 'minimalist' than that, imo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,369 Posts
My favorite tank--at the moment--is a 3g planted vase that holds a breeding pair of hybrid endlers, some cherry shrimp culls, dozens of snails and some scuds.

No filter, no heater, light is the highest lumen bulb I could get a standard goose neck reading lamp to accept and the indirect light it gets from windows on either end of the apartment. Daily feeding, once a week I do a 20% water change and a light dosing of liquid ferts and pull any excess floaters, once a month I do a light pruning and run a floss wrapped bamboo skewer around the walls to scrub off whatever algae has built up--usually pretty light.

Plants are mix of clipping and cast offs from my main tanks: crypts, hygro "sunset", cardamine lyrata, xmas moss, some chain swordish thing I've long since forgotten the name of, probably still some temple plant and glosso in the mix as well. Plus riccia, frogbit, hornwort and spiky guppy grass.

The hobby is only as complicated as you want it to be.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
45 Posts
As far as minimalism goes i believe the fluval spec captures the design aspect of it amazingly. The specs however leave much to be desired. It also depends which type of minimalism you're going after ie maintenance wise or design/scape wise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
828 Posts
To me, minimalist design is a high tech Iwagumi setup. But just hide all your equipment so nothing shows. That's the whole point of ADA-type style tanks - with their glass lily pipes, the goal is to not distract viewers from the actual aquarium itself. I would look up good examples of Iwagumi setups if you aren't familiar with them. They make use of high tech gear like direct cO2 but you try to hide the equipment so people just focus on the plants/fish/layout.

Either iwagumi or some hardscape where there's just some rocks and wood in there but this is planted tank website so I would go for actual plants in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think that some of the natural style pond like tanks capture my idea of minimalism best.

Absolutely minimal maintenance. Minimal power use, given sunlight supplemented low light. I really would like a tank I could travel a few weeks at a time with and not worry about.

From what I have seen so far, it seems like to make this work well I would need:

1. A relatively large tank in terms of surface area
2. A light fish load of small fishes capable of feeding on micro-organisms in the tank ecosystem
3. Fertile substrate
4. Some kind of riparium planting
5. A window to place it by.

I am really starting to like the idea od the ecosystem style tanks.

Trying to set one up would probably be a test of my self control. It seems like every time I mess with my tanks it always ends up being more fish, more light, more co2, more ferts, and more maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,484 Posts
This is not by any means 'minimalist' by any description, but it's my ongoing effort to bring things down to their lowest possible level, while still looking after the discus' needs, in a planted environment, as best as is possible for me:

http://s1105.photobucket.com/albums/h357/discuspaul/lolliblues2

If you wish, you could check out my 'Beginner's Guide to Discus' in the fish section - the first & only sticky, and you'll see a pic, somewhere near the end, of a pair of discus in a tank with nothing more than one piece of driftwood & a little sand - there's nothing more 'minimalist' than that, imo.
I think your tanks are gorgeous but I would hardly call them minimalist. The wc requirements alone would put them in the high category for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
What would a minimalists tank look like? Minimal equipment, minimal maintenance.
Ditch the heater by going subtropical. Species list here.

Plant heavily and stock low to ditch the filter. (Alternatively, hook a sponge filter to an air pump, some of which can burn as little as 1.5 watts of power per hour.)

For lighting, switch to LED.

This leaves you with only lighting plugged in. I suppose you could place the tank near a window that gets sunlight and ditch the lighting too.

Look up information on how people kept aquariums prior to the invention of electricity and copy their methods.

I am headed this way myself. My plans can be found here.
 

·
Carpe Diem
Joined
·
7,562 Posts
This picture is from a thread above... Removing the heater will make it even more minimalistic. If you take the filter out, then no filter maintenance. Might as well drain the water and just wipe off the dust every 6 months.

:icon_twis

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
I love the simple composition and outlines of the large stones in this minimalist hardscape (see link below) for fancy goldfish. I think the rounded shape of the stones goes very well with the rounded egg-shapes of the goldfish. The gentle air wand bubble action behind the stones kind of breaks up the negative space above and behind the stones. In fact this whole design is about positive and negative space, active and inactive---love it! It was designed by the Aquarium Design Group.


http://youtu.be/9zi-Wn5nKi8
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,840 Posts
In terms of tanks, I was in the same boat as you. I had up to 6 tanks with 2 being at the GF's house, 2-4 at mine. I got really frustrated with the whole hobby. I planned to go down to one tank but I like a nano so I kept that an a bigger tank. It really renewed my interest as it takes up a fraction of my time now. I enjoy it much more. The only way I would have been happier is if I had the money to buy everything I wanted but I sacrificed and pieced together the best of my equipment for each tank.

As for lower maintenance, their are two ways to go. One is to simplify everything. That would mainly be lighting, go lower, skip the CO2 but keep everything balanced. You may only top off and never really clean the tank or filter if it's balanced and not stocked heavily. The other way is to get complex. Make everything automated from water changes, fert dosing, etc. Run two filters.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top