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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I have the MA957 Milwaukee Regulator that I am trying to use again. It hasn't been used in about 10 months. I can't seem to get any CO2 to come out. Basically the left gauge reads 50, and the right gauge will go up to the 10 PSI and still nothing.

There was air coming out of the pressure relief valve, so I tightened that. I tried one more time and still nothing.

My next step is going to be to try and drill out the needle valve. I have tried to take the bubble counter off with regular wrenches, but it is on there extremely well.

Does anyone have any helpful hints on how to remove it, or has anyone experienced anything like this in the past?

I appreciate any help that you can provide.
 

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Since the left/right can be different depending on how the gauges are turned, we can only guess that the high pressure gauge is reading 50PSI. If true, your tank is pretty close to totally empty.
What is your confidence level on reading the gauges? High pressure should be 700-1000PSI with any liquid left in the tank. The low pressure gauge will not even have those numbers in most cases.
Make sure of having gas before more testing or changes.
 

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I had a similar issue with mine last year. I kept turning it up higher and higher, but had barely any CO2 going into my tank. I suspected a leak, and replaced tubing, check valves, even switched out the diffuser to no avail. Finally, I replaced the O rings. They looked fine and had no wear and tear I could see, but when I added new ones ($4 for a 10 pack at Home Depot) all my issues disappeared. A quick and cheap try at least.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
According to the outer numbers on the left gauge I have 50 which is about half. According to the lower numbers its about 750.

I am confident that the gas I have is sufficient. My tank feels heavier than it would if it was empty as well.

How much CO2 did you have coming out? I can't produce a single bubble which is leading me to believe that it is jammed/clogged.
 

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I could crank it up and have a ton coming out, but within minutes it would be back to zero again. After the O ring switch, that problem went away.
 

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If you look toward the bottom of each gauge, it says that the inner ring numbers are labelled psi, and the outer ring numbers are kg/cm2. So when you say that the working pressure gauge read "10", really it was at 140 psi. Which is higher than the relief valve will blow at.

I'm not sure what happened, but tightening the relief valve wasn't a good idea. Try loosening it a bit and start over, slowly working up from zero? And remember that turning the regulator knob to the right (clockwise) increases pressure. So start with it all the way to the left.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yea when I max it out the pressure relief goes off and no CO2 comes out still.

Bump: Ok, so I was at 750 PSI on the left and at one point I did bring the right gauge up to 140 PSI for no longer than 5 seconds and reset it back to 0.

I used to use this regulator all the time without problems, so this isnt the first time I have installed it on my CO2 tank. It is the first time that nothing has happened though.

I reset the relief valve and it does the same thing.
 

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Co2 is not hard but it can be confused when starting. A good place to start is getting the reg right so you are on the right path. Reading the high pressure at 750 is in the right ballpark so you are past that. Then to avoid potential to blow the low pressure gauge, turn the working pressure knob/adjustment counterclockwise until you feel it is "loose". Do this every time before opening the tank valve or risk blowing the meter.
Once you have the reg on the tank, slowly ease the tank valve open and check the high pressure where you should see 700PSI and up. If you get there, move on to begin turning low (working) pressure up to 10-20PSI. If this is done and you get no signs of leaking, etc. , you can begin to move further down the line. But if you have signs of trouble stop at that point and fix the problem before throwing more questions into the mix.
If you have good pressure and set the low, you can try powering and unplugging the solenoid which should give you some bubbles at the end of the line is you've not screwed the needle valve in too tight. Don't use the needle valve to stop and start flow as it is not designed for that and will damage it over time. If you get no bubbles, stop to find why. Solenoids can stick open or closed. If you get bubbles adjust the pressure and/or the needle valve to get the amount you want.
But before getting too concerned with fine adjustments, it will save time and money if you do a good soap check on every part of the system. Assuming all is well is likely to put you back to square one where you go get a new tank of CO2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Great call! I found a leak on my left gauge where it meets the regulator. I will look into how I should fix that now. Hopefully that is the main reason it wasnt working.
 

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Okay! Making progress now.
A fix on the leak may be simple or a bit more trouble. If it is leaking around the threads that screw into the body, backing it out, adding tape or dope of your choice can be somewhat easy. Tools and a bit of muscle combined with some care in where and how the tape or dope can fix a simple leak. Use care to not put so much tape or dope on that it gets over the end of the threads where it can get moved on into the other parts, though.

But if the tank and reg have not been opened correctly, the meter may be leaking inside but only letting the CO2 show up when it comes out of the meter cover. There is a small tube of super thin metal inside the meter and if the high pressure hits it while the reg is getting it's act together to really regulate, the metal tube can split. Not uncommon and the reason for using care when turning things on. This one can cost a new meter. Still not terribly expensive but not something to repeat if it can be avoided.
Good luck.
 

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I fixed the leak and still nothing. At this point I do think I need to take apart the solenoid and clean it out.

It was the solenoid. I had another one from a paintball setup that I put on it to test out and it works great. Do I need a needle valve/bubble counter?

What disadvantage am I at if I run my CO2 tank without it?

Bump: Also I cannot get the needle valve/bubble counter off the solenoid head. Anyone have any good suggestions?
 

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Do I need a needle valve/bubble counter?

What disadvantage am I at if I run my CO2 tank without it?
A bubble counter is not required, but a needle valve is needed to obtain the low flow rates that are required for aquariums. Without it, you will not be able to control the flow rate.

Bump: Also I cannot get the needle valve/bubble counter off the solenoid head. Anyone have any good suggestions?
It may be glued in, so you may need to use a(n appropriately sized) wrench with a longer handle to get enough torque.
 
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