The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,378 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When arcuata and brevipes are side by side in an aquascape, are they notably different from each other? If they were randomly bunched up together with each other, would anyone notice that it's a mixture of the two?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Arcuata develops slightly thinner arcing leaves two at a time on a thinner stem.

Side by side differences are quite apparent. Arcuata takes a bushy like form since it has thinner stems, while brevipes seems to prefer more vertical growth. I would not use the two to achieve the same effect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
It's actually brevipes that's bushier. L. brevipes is also a bit more substantial and has leaves that are usually greenish or at least paler closer to the stem. It is also more orange, whereas L. arcuata is red. Under low light or substandard conditions, it can be harder to tell them apart based on vegetative differences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,378 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So under high lighting the two have different characteristics, right? One could be used to accent the other, and not just blend in with it all?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Brevipes may appear to be bushier because it has more form. Arcuata is more delicate looking and should be considered the anorexic brother to brevipes. I've only seen brevipes in high light/co2 conditions, however I grow arcuata in both high and low tech tanks. In a high tech tank arcuata loves to throw roots in an attempt to become bushy, which can be very attractive. In a low tech it takes almost a dwarf like form, with less than two millimeters between each node and no nodal roots. I like this type of growth as well. My 2c :icon_cool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
So under high lighting the two have different characteristics, right? One could be used to accent the other, and not just blend in with it all?

Sure, I guess so. I've seen the together, but as part of a scape. Might be interesting.

L. brevipes is slower to gain height and really fills in before growing up.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top