The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fairly new to planted tanks. Just wondering:
My stem plants seem to be sending out tons of roots from a lot the leaf sections. Is this normal or does it mean something? Limnophila aromatica, dwarf baby tears, anacharis, water sprite are all doing it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,991 Posts
JeffP: Sounds like it's time for you to invest in a pair of long scissors from the dreaded eBay. Ha!

You're about to find out - in a couple weeks - why so many of us feel crazy after being a part of this hobby for an extended period of time. Pruning, trimming, yadda yadda. But you'll grow to love it.

Though, if you're the JeffP who ordered Osmocote Plus caps from me, I think your root situation will calm down within a month. On occasion I've forgotten to fertilize Eco-Complete when I start a new tank and it takes a month or so to get them under control once I remember to do the right thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
JeffP: Sounds like it's time for you to invest in a pair of long scissors from the dreaded eBay. Ha!

You're about to find out - in a couple weeks - why so many of us feel crazy after being a part of this hobby for an extended period of time. Pruning, trimming, yadda yadda. But you'll grow to love it.

Though, if you're the JeffP who ordered Osmocote Plus caps from me, I think your root situation will calm down within a month. On occasion I've forgotten to fertilize Eco-Complete when I start a new tank and it takes a month or so to get them under control once I remember to do the right thing.
Why would you have to fertilize eco complete on a new tank? Are you using old eco?
I thought eco complete comes with bb and is pre fertilized.
At least thats what my bags say when I've used it to start my tanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
Fairly new to planted tanks. Just wondering:
My stem plants seem to be sending out tons of roots from a lot the leaf sections. Is this normal or does it mean something? Limnophila aromatica, dwarf baby tears, anacharis, water sprite are all doing it.
Just trim them as close to the stem as you can. Make sure you invest in the scissors you're happy with. I've always regretted my impulse buy. Lol.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,991 Posts
Just to update...

I recently had a bad batch of EC and here's what the CaribSea, Inc. Sales Manager for North America told me via email:

"[T]here is nothing organic in the product other than some tannins and bacteria cultures… the substrate itself is inert biologically speaking…"

(They replaced my bad batch quickly, by the way)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,536 Posts
Ecocomplete is porous, and to some extent will retain whatever fertilizer it can sequester, but there really is no appreciable amount of useable nutrients in the fired clay. The minerals in it are bound up in a crystalline structure that isn't useable by the plants.

Flourite makes the same claim about having nutrients, but although the elements listed may be there, it's somewhat misleading to refer to them as nutrients. The glass your aquarium is made from contains iron, but nobody is claiming that aquarium glass is a nutrient source.

I suppose that lithotrophic bacteria could eventually break fired clay down into a bioavailable form, but for all practical purposes, ecocomplete is inert.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,974 Posts
Ecocomplete is porous, and to some extent will retain whatever fertilizer it can sequester, but there really is no appreciable amount of useable nutrients in the fired clay. The minerals in it are bound up in a crystalline structure that isn't useable by the plants.

Flourite makes the same claim about having nutrients, but although the elements listed may be there, it's somewhat misleading to refer to them as nutrients. The glass your aquarium is made from contains iron, but nobody is claiming that aquarium glass is a nutrient source.

I suppose that lithotrophic bacteria could eventually break fired clay down into a bioavailable form, but for all practical purposes, ecocomplete is inert.
I think this can be said about most "plant" substrates. :) Regardless, I think people should add root tabs to the substrate, especially if one is running a high tech tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
As interesting as this conversation is, I'm using sand because I only wanted to invest as little as possible since it's my first one and wanted to test it out first. Anyway, I have a pair of small micro tip pruning scissors that I've been using to trim the leaves and stuff off as they die off when I first put the plants in, so those should be able to get me pretty close to the stems.

I did get a bunch of caps for some heavy root feeders I plan on getting, but was wondering if I put caps under each plant and stopped doing major dosing in the water column, would that make the stem plants want to shoot more roots down into the sand instead of out into the water?
 

·
Surrounded by Blyxa
Joined
·
1,543 Posts
In my torn down high tech tank, my ludwigia would grow multiple roots into the water column at a rate of several inches a day. It was extremely annoying and made it difficult to enjoy the stems. Substrate was Eco-Complete with root tabs. My low tech tank has a few ludwigia clippings, Eco-complete and root tabs, but no water column roots.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,907 Posts
I HAVE HUGE WATER COLUMN ROOTS i love it lol. just cause it means when it comes to replant after trimming too many times. i just trim below a ball of roots and it'll stay planted and roots itsselfvery quickly. especially since if i dont do this the roots that form under the substrate are tiny for ludwigia

@mr fish. if u do soil. cap it with plain gravel.. lots of it. cause it makes messes
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top