The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I just rescaped last night, and because of a few things, I'm looking for a new "showcase" or "centerpiece" fish/fishes. The tank specs are listed below but my main thing is that I have relatively hard water. I'd love to hear anyone and everyone's opinion!!

It's a tall 60-gallon tank (24" in height), Fluval Stratum, and no C02. Current Fish Stock: Panda and albino cory’s, Silvertip, Black neon, Cardinal and rosy tetras, a few Hillstream loaches, and a Zebra loach.

Water Parameters:
  • Temp – 77 F
  • ph – 7
  • KH - 5 (Tap is 3)
  • GH - 13 (Tap is 8)
  • TDS 350 - 450 range (Tap is 225ish)

Please ignore the angels in the picture, they're being moved to a 29 gallon until my friend can pick them up. I'm tired of them eating my cardinals.

1025979
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
Gourami, rainbowfish, small cichlids (keyholes come to mind). Idk how well it would do in there but in my mind I could see an elephant fish in there, but they are not very hardy at all and if you're slightly new to the hobby it probably wouldn't be a good idea, butterfly fish are another one that are not beginner fish but I think would look gorgeous in your tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for the recommendations!! I like the idea of the gourami's and will look into the different varieties.

Gourami, rainbowfish, small cichlids (keyholes come to mind). Idk how well it would do in there but in my mind I could see an elephant fish in there, but they are not very hardy at all and if you're slightly new to the hobby it probably wouldn't be a good idea, butterfly fish are another one that are not beginner fish but I think would look gorgeous in your tank.
I was thinking the same thing about some smaller cichlids too. I think the keyholes look cool, what about an Electric Blue Acara? Or would it eat my smaller tetras too?

I love the look of the African Butterfly fish but I've never seen them in my LFS, and I don't think I could have one with my open tank. Oh, and when I looked them up I also came across the African Butterfly Chiclid (Anomalochromis thomasi), does anyone have any experience with them? They look similar to Rams but might be better suited for my tank than the South American varieties.


Some ideas:
That said, you can probably help everything out by doing some big water changes. Nothing in that tank should be raising your gh so its just build up from evaporation and refilling.
Very good point, I will definitely increase the amount of water that I change to help keep the levels down. I'm currently doing 30 - 40% water change weekly. Should I increase the percentage, or just do a much larger change every other cleaning?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,998 Posts
Thank you all for the recommendations!! I like the idea of the gourami's and will look into the different varieties.


I was thinking the same thing about some smaller cichlids too. I think the keyholes look cool, what about an Electric Blue Acara? Or would it eat my smaller tetras too?

I love the look of the African Butterfly fish but I've never seen them in my LFS, and I don't think I could have one with my open tank. Oh, and when I looked them up I also came across the African Butterfly Chiclid (Anomalochromis thomasi), does anyone have any experience with them? They look similar to Rams but might be better suited for my tank than the South American varieties.




Very good point, I will definitely increase the amount of water that I change to help keep the levels down. I'm currently doing 30 - 40% water change weekly. Should I increase the percentage, or just do a much larger change every other cleaning?
I do a minimum 50% water change per week and frequently its closer to 70+%. That coupled with plant growth means my kh/gh is pretty close to my tap water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
Thank you all for the recommendations!! I like the idea of the gourami's and will look into the different varieties.


I was thinking the same thing about some smaller cichlids too. I think the keyholes look cool, what about an Electric Blue Acara? Or would it eat my smaller tetras too?

I love the look of the African Butterfly fish but I've never seen them in my LFS, and I don't think I could have one with my open tank. Oh, and when I looked them up I also came across the African Butterfly Chiclid (Anomalochromis thomasi), does anyone have any experience with them? They look similar to Rams but might be better suited for my tank than the South American varieties.




Very good point, I will definitely increase the amount of water that I change to help keep the levels down. I'm currently doing 30 - 40% water change weekly. Should I increase the percentage, or just do a much larger change every other cleaning?
My experience with A. Thomasi puts them in the "highly likely to harass tankmates" when I kept African cichlids. They do better in a heavily stocked african feature. They would survive in a set up like yours but you wouldn't get to see the interactions or coloration you would get in an African cichlid fish only tank.

Blue acara are definitely doable, just keep an eye on them when you get them because though they are mostly peaceful every once in a while you run into a bully that will terrorize your tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I do a minimum 50% water change per week and frequently its closer to 70+%. That coupled with plant growth means my kh/gh is pretty close to my tap water.
I had been doing 50-60% water changes weekly but my plants weren't growing very well. At the suggestion from my LFS, I started doing smaller water changes and they took off!! Any clue why?


My experience with A. Thomasi puts them in the "highly likely to harass tankmates" when I kept African cichlids. They do better in a heavily stocked african feature. They would survive in a set up like yours but you wouldn't get to see the interactions or coloration you would get in an African cichlid fish only tank.

Blue acara are definitely doable, just keep an eye on them when you get them because though they are mostly peaceful every once in a while you run into a bully that will terrorize your tank.
Okay, I'm happy to hear from someone that has actually kept them, I couldn't find a lot of info online. To be honest, I'm a little bummed because they look awesome, but maybe in the future with a different tank.

And good to know about the Acara's, how many should I get? Is it better to have one, or a small group?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
You could go with a group of 3, just be prepared to separate one of them if you wind up having 2 of them pair off. Another option is kribensis, they are pretty unique and you have enough room for about 4 of them- try to get either all male or all female as they are prolific breeders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,485 Posts
I had been doing 50-60% water changes weekly but my plants weren't growing very well. At the suggestion from my LFS, I started doing smaller water changes and they took off!! Any clue why?
What are you doing for fertilization? Your LFS guy is probably ill informed, and was thinking that you needed to have higher organics for your plants. If you don't fertilize at all he could have been right, but it's not the most ideal way to do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You could go with a group of 3, just be prepared to separate one of them if you wind up having 2 of them pair off. Another option is kribensis, they are pretty unique and you have enough room for about 4 of them- try to get either all male or all female as they are prolific breeders.
Okay, I'll keep that in mind on the Acara's. And as for the Kribensis I had originally thought about them but thought that they needed sand, like Apistos. Is that not the case? And would Kribs be okay with my Cory's?

What are you doing for fertilization? Your LFS guy is probably ill-informed and was thinking that you needed to have higher organics for your plants. If you don't fertilize at all he could have been right, but it's not the most ideal way to do it.
I'm currently using NilocG ThriveS and have been doing about half of the suggested dosage. I've been doing that because my current lights are very weak and when I added the full dosage I had bad staghorn algae. That issue is going to be corrected though because my new light should actually be arriving today!!!! I got the Hygger Advanced Multi-Color Full Spectrum LED and I'm really excited.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
Kribs don't necessarily need sand and they might get pushy with cories but it's more like a territory squabble and the cories just move out of the way, it's actually kind of funny to watch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Kribs don't necessarily need sand and they might get pushy with cories but it's more like a territory squabble and the cories just move out of the way, it's actually kind of funny to watch.
Okay, good to know. If I get a few males or a few females would I still need to provide a cave? Or are the need for caves just for spawning purposes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
I would provide them a structure, doesn't have to be a stone cave, just a little hidey hole they can make their own, you can do this with hardscape or plants. I had a pair choose a nook in a piece of driftwood to spawn in before. Eggs wound up molding over and I had to trash the driftwood, but it was funny to watch them. They picked a clay pots after that and about a year later and well over 200 fry later I rehomed them, that's why I said to try to make sure you get all of 1 sex. I'm not the only person that has had this happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Yah, Kribs are really beautiful little cichlids, but I would argue they are some of the most successful parents among the smaller species of aquarium fish. It takes about 6 months to go from 2 to 100, and mommas with fry are tiny terrors.

If you can get all one sex then they are well worth keeping though on account of their colors and largely peaceful nature in a community tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
Yah, Kribs are really beautiful little cichlids, but I would argue they are some of the most successful parents among the smaller species of aquarium fish. It takes about 6 months to go from 2 to 100, and mommas with fry are tiny terrors.

If you can get all one sex then they are well worth keeping though on account of their colors and largely peaceful nature in a community tank.
Yea, I forgot to mention I had 2 pair. 1 pair took to the pots right away, the other had the driftwood fail. I know not everyone has the same experience but just to err on the side of caution and warn about what can happen. They are beautiful. I like that they are so different than other african cichlids. They remind me of less psychotic apistos. Much more forgiving too. They are incredibly hardy for a small cichlid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yah, Kribs are really beautiful little cichlids, but I would argue they are some of the most successful parents among the smaller species of aquarium fish. It takes about 6 months to go from 2 to 100, and mommas with fry are tiny terrors.

If you can get all one sex then they are well worth keeping though on account of their colors and largely peaceful nature in a community tank.
This is all great info, I really appreciate it! For now, I will definitely make sure to just get the same gender. Would I need to get 2-3 from the start, or would it be okay to just start with one and then maybe and another down the road?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
I have always introduced 2-3 at a time. They are cichlids and while they are usually very peaceful in community settings they can be aggressive towards each other in boundary disputes. If you're able to keep a close eye on the tanks for the first couple of days I suppose you could introduce 1 at a time, I just wouldn't wait too long in between introductions.

Wait- that wasn't your question. I do think your scenario could work, just make sure you have lost of hiding spaces and try to have a line of sight block between 2 sections of your tank and keep a close eye on them for the first few days. Also make sure the one you're introducing is the same size as the largest of the 2 you already have.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top