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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So this is my 75 gallon I've had running since about August ish. I have medium to high light and use duckweed to keep the PAR down to something manageable as I made a mistake in lightning when I bought a new fixture. I don't have any CO2 and the substrate is AquariumPlants.com own brand. I have Water Wisteria, Stargrass, Willow Hygro, a little Sunset Hygro, an Anubias nana, an unknown sword, some Java Moss, several unknown stem plants and one rooted plant, and several Java Fern plants. I have a few granite rocks that have been somewhat overtaken, three different artificial tree root decorations, and a few small pieces of driftwood. The one large piece still isn't completely soaked up and requires a rock on one end to keep it from bobbing to the surface.

I'd enjoy hearing some aquascaping tips from you guys. I'm a long-time lurker and really only understand basics like rules of thirds and placing taller plants in the background. Right now the tank is set up somewhat like a greek theatre, with a rounded flat area at the front and increasingly taller items all the way to the back. My hope is to eventually propogate my wisteria into a background plant across the entire aquarium rear; I can probably achieve that before Christmas with the way I have to keep pruning and planting the cuttings.

I'm open to ideas also in terms of replacing the hardscape elements, but it would help me if you could point me to an image of what you're suggesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So..maybe red-toned plants, really dark ones, or really screaming lime light colored ones. I think all the green things in the tank help reflect more of that same-colored light, making them all look green. Hopefully a couple of red plants in showy bunches can help that.

And I'm reasonably sure it's not cyanobacteria, it doesn't have that...film cyanobacteria does. The algae I have is an extremely short, single strand fuzz type that the platies munch on all day. It doesn't grow on the substrate, but loves the slower-growing plants and is a fine layer on all the decor reached by light. I've been told by some other aquarium enthusiasts that I need to either cut the light(Which I'm attempting to do with duckweed) or add CO2(Keeping my eye out for an affordable setup). I'm pretty religious about water changes to keep the nitrates down, so I think I just have an aquarium that makes plants(even nonvascular ones) really happy.
 

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It's hard to say from the pic. But keeping the nitrates down is what causes bga. I keep mine between 5-20 to keep bga away. I always get it when I dont dose for a week or something like that. Just smell your tank....if it stinks you have bga, if it doesn't your good.
 

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At the moment there are lots of interesting shapes fighting for attention so you never take in the whole tank. Some of the pieces of wood are pointing one way and others are pointing the opposite direction which breaks up the flow of the tank and make it feel a little chaotic. Its not a bad thing if you want a jungle theme but if you were aiming for that manicured scaped look you need to rethink the hardscape. Look at scapes you like and try and work out why you like them and how it was achieved.
 

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At the moment there are lots of interesting shapes fighting for attention so you never take in the whole tank. Some of the pieces of wood are pointing one way and others are pointing the opposite direction which breaks up the flow of the tank and make it feel a little chaotic. Its not a bad thing if you want a jungle theme but if you were aiming for that manicured scaped look you need to rethink the hardscape. Look at scapes you like and try and work out why you like them and how it was achieved.
I agree. I think the tank looks fantastic, however, you seem to have the focal point as the empty area in the exact center of the tank with the driftwood/rock pieces framing it.

I would perhaps keep the large driftwood piece on the left exactly where it is at, move the driftwood piece on the right to the middle (or out of the tank altogether?), and move the "open" area to the right of the tank. This would create a sloping effect from left to right.

In essence though it is your tank. Do what makes you feel comfortable and what you will enjoy looking at. After all, you are the one that gets to come home and look at it everyday, not us! :)
 
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