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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am not the kind of person to go around complaining about stuff, but after working in food service now for a few months now, I am really appalled.


First, the amount of food that is wasted is ridiculous. Any left over food is just dumped, people order food and don't touch it, and the salad bar is always destroyed everyday to the point that everything has to be disposed of and replaced.

Second, the amount of nasty chemicals that are used and not properly disposed of is scary. There is some dish-washing de-lime chemicals that require goggles and gloves to be worn when handling and yet the bottles that they come in (with some leftover chemicals) are just thrown into the trash. This stuff isn't supposed to be picked up with other hazardous materials?

Third, and this one is pretty simple. How many different kinds of dishes do people really need? Does a bowl of soup really need a saucer under neath it? Do people really need separate forks for there salads and the main meal?

Does anybody else see the need to start lessening our ways of excess?
 

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One could argue that anything is excessive. The fact that we spend money to keep aquatic life alive in a synthetic environment would seem silly to those in the Third World. To us more fortunate, we have a different view.

People dump food because of sanitary codes and regulations, not just for convenience or to be wasteful. Product is bought and sold, and thrown out. It is the consumer's choice as they paid for it what they do with it. Food shipped overseas for aid routinely gets dumped or kept to the point of being spoiled and unusable. Not "always," but a good part of the time.

The amount of dishes used has to do with etiquette, I suppose. Though, I would think that a saucer is used to rest your soup spoon on. Just proper manners and what we're taught to do.

In terms of the chemicals, I would tend to agree with you. But not being incredibly familiar with any potential chemical reaction, perhaps it becomes inert relatively soon once exposed to the atmosphere or water (probably water).

The trick is live within your means, and not purposefully be gluttonous, selfish, or wasteful. But, if I don't want to finish the occasional meal, I am not going to worry about it. Anything beyond the facts is insinuation. The people of this country give more to charities than any other nation by far. Keep that in mind too.
 

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One view is it's wrong to waste food that could feed the hungry.

Another view is all food eventually feeds something, even if it's rats, worms, fungus, bacteria.

We had a friend visit years ago in the winter time. At that time we had a bird feeder in the yard. While she was watching the Disney like scene a Hawk came in a picked off a a bird. It was hard for her to understand our indifference when I explained ALL the birds need to eat, not just the pretty ones.


On that chemical question every chemical sold has safety info on the Label or an MSDS(material safety data sheet) available. I'd suggest you simply read that info yourself. If your employer is not following the law on handling that product, there are people you can call anomously that will be happy to look into the issue.

On your 3rd point, google "Emily Post" she has those answers.:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We literally throw away half a dozen hamburgers and hot dogs each meal that were just extra.

But I guess it is just the perspective. Some people see things differently. I really have not been raised by my family to use extra unnecessary dishes and to throw away extra food.

Couldn't some of this stuff like left over food be composted too?

The other thing I forgot to mention was the amount of cardboard and aluminum cans we just throw away. That stuff can be recycled pretty easily can't it?
 

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Now just multiply your waste by 100,000+ restaurants in the US alone, and you have an idea of how much waste there is. I don't worry so much about the lime-away because that's usually just phosphoric acid and a few stabilizers (coca-cola). What slays me is the vast amounts of water and natural gas that gets used in a restaurant daily.
 

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Look around your town for a food program where restaurants donate left overs. Talk to your manager if you find one.
One reason many restaurants don't donate the food is liability. It's cheaper for them to just trash it then risk a lawsuit. Unfortunate but true. At least with the restaurants I have dealings with including the one right next door.

Does a bowl of soup really need a saucer underneath it?
Short answer is YES. Keeps most small spills off the table. And your shirt sleeve.

You may notice that the forks are (in most cases) exactly the same. But many people leave the first on the plate and it goes when the server picks up the plate of salad you just finished. You still have a clean fork for your entree with the second fork. You ought to try a tradition 7 to 9 course Italian meal. Now that's a sitting. And the salad fork is different than the entree fork. Fewer tines I think but won't swear to.

By the same token does any President actually need a new pen after only signing his signature only once with the one he just put down? Think it goes for governors also.
 

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food is only good for so long. you cant safely store it for too long, at its optimal eating temp, and reheating it changes the taste and texture, and would not be good for the restaurants business (i know i wouldnt eat somewhere that served me reheated french fries). so better have extra food prepped than not enough. which means you want some wasted as a buffer.
and in the broader spectrum, food waste is good too. it serves as a buffer against famine in the population which has excess and wastes it. so while other countries may be hungry, it as actually in the interest of the majority to not share. read "lifeboat ethics" many people have an emotional aversion to the content, but from a logical standpoint it makes perfect sense.
 

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I have been feeding the public in one form or another for the last
seventeen years. As a high turn-over industry finding experienced
help, that cares enough to properly dispose of chemicals. Is as hard
to find as you got it, a needle in a haystack.

With every year that passes I continue to grow more jaded to the
lack of common sense, or simple brain function that abounds.

Massive amounts of food waste can be attributed to the staff in
plenty of ways, but people are just plain old picky and messy. That
is a fact. Whether it be dressing slopped across the buffet, or various
items left behind on a plate to be bussed. Everyone is guilty once or
twice.

Government rules and regulations consider issues like public health to
take priority over wasted product. Every time I re-certify with Serv-Safe
I am reminded just how much food falls into the latter category.
 

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Knuckle deep in the pudding. I have seen it with my own eyes. And felt it with my own fingers. By mistake I was looking at a cute girl and overstimulated where a plate was and my hands ended up in the pudding, I was in the military back then and had my uniform on with my name tag on. I thought no one noticed. I was wrong. Not sure what happened to the pudding.
 
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