The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive been looking into some live foods for my fish and I was wondering if Daphnia is a good food for neon tetras. And is it possible to get an infestation of these creatures if I use them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
423 Posts
pretty much all fish will love daphnia.

It is possible to start a population in a tank but I think that would be difficult as fish would probably try to keep eating them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, the more I look into it the more I like the idea. Seems like if I took a 2g tank and just made some nasty water with an airstone I could keep a nice food supply.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
423 Posts
ah...a 2L bottle. good idea! how's the bottle work compared to the tanks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Bottle works as well or better than the tiny tanks. The bottle has aged gravel in the bottom and a couple of snails and some moss. I pour some water out into brine shrimp net (capturing daphnia for feeding to fish) and pour some green water in. If you fiddle with it every day it's no problem. I keep it loosely capped to discourage insects laying eggs in there as I keep it on the porch.

ah...a 2L bottle. good idea! how's the bottle work compared to the tanks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So here is my daphnia setup ive installed with an old 10g ive had empty. Lack an air pump to keep the water moving, but im gearing up for some gw first. Filled it half full added enough NPK and comprehensive for my 55g, some crushed spirinula flakes, and turned on the light and heat. Probabbly wont need the heater, its over my washer/dryer in my utility room. What do yall think?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,419 Posts
Dude, daphnia are the easiest things in the world. You're already too high-tech for them with that set up, haha. I keep mine outside year round and in the winter I bring some in just incase my outside culture dies off in the winter, which hasn't happened yet.

1: Empty tank/bucket/whatever holds water (surface area is more important than depth).
2: fill with old tank water from water changes, add a snail or two (i'll tell you why in a moment) and a piece of lettuce.
3: let sit until the water goes green, changing the water with old tank water now and again.
4: Aquire starter culture of daphnia, and acclimate them like you would fish or any other fauna


Now and again, add a piece of lettuce or any other leafy green. Continue to change water with old tank water now and again.
The snails are good at monitoring water quality within a daphnia culture. Don't ask me why, but I've noticed over the four years that I've kept daphnia in a bucket/container, that the snails move towards the top of the container when water quality decreases. Just a very good observation I've made.
****
I do suggest keeping two cultures going, as a populations do tend to just 'crash' out of no where an you can experience a massive die off. I'm not sure why, but it does happen now and again, but usually within the die-off tank, a few survive to re-populate it. This is why it helps to have another supply always going.

inflatable kiddie pools are excellent for it in the summer months, as the water can get warm- this is why surface area is more important: it allows more surface area for gas exchange. Warmer water carries less oxygen than colder water.

As for adding an airstone to your tank, I don't see the need for it. The only reason people use them I find is that it helps with oxygen/gas exchange. If you do decide to use one, set it on one good sized bubble every now and again. Don't have it fizzing, as the daphnia can get the bubbles caught up under their carapace.
I don't use an airstone myself.

You can keep a screen over it if you want to keep bugs out, but my outdoor cultures I leave un-covered as I also get to collect mosquito larvae that way.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top