The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

I have a 75 gallon heavily planted tank. Currently have lf zebra danios, sterbai cory's, zebra otos, threadfin and celebes rainbows, and some blue eye forktail (furcata) rainbows, still small. I recently purchased 2 german blue rams. Think they are both males. A little chasing, nothing lethal. Anyway my lfs has just gotten in some apistogramma: cacatuoides, agassizii double red, and trifasciata blue. They are young and not too colored yet. Sexing may be difficult, but not impossible. I was hoping to get two pair, probably the cacatuoides, along with the agassizii double red, but may the trifasciata blue. Questions are will there be issues with my other fish? Is this too many with the current blue rams. Do you recommend just one additional pair? I would wait to see how one pair does, but these go fast and they can't get them often. Also, not interested in breeding at this point. Any suggestions and which species?
Thanks,
Doug
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
After some googling, it appears only one species should be kept in one tank. ph 7 to 7+, the cockatoo and agg double red are both so cool looking, hard to choose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
If your tank is heavily planted you could easily keep 2 or 3 pair. That being said, probably best to start slow and do lots of research. Cacatuoides is probably the best one to start with, not too demanding, not too aggressive, easy to breed ect. If your water is on the hard side might be best to stick with the Cockatoos. If you want something closer to the wild type fish Trifasciata is a good choice, I haven't kept them personally so I can't tell you too much about them, I've heard they need soft water to get the really extended fin rays on the males. I've had wild agassizi, (never a fan of the line bred red strain) they are gorgeous fish, I would say semi-aggressive, and could do well in a wide range of water parameters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So googling more, probably best to keep one type of apisto. Cockatoos, (now that i know what it means its much easier to spell), I guess are not too aggressive and look good. the Aggasazii double reds look good too. I'm thinking of trying to get two males as problems seem to happen once spawning starts. It may be hard to sex them at their age. The fish store almost doesn't want to help, it's like they want you to end up with females, since so many of their species they carry-the prettier males get bought up, and they're stuck trying to get rid of plain females. Anyways, any suggestions. Oh, what about my six cory's? Water is 79f. Usually was in the 7.6-7.8ph range, but was a 7 last time I checked. I did add quite a bit of manzanita branches. no idea on kh, but I bet its on the upper end. Buffalo water pluse lots of seiryu stone. I have a kit but haven't used. Any votes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
If your going to do one species I'd just get a pair-If you want more they will probably end up breeding in a few months and you will get plenty of them. If your read up and look at lots of pics, sexing them is not very hard-unless they are really young juveniles, but I have never seen a store offing juveniles that young. In cacautoides look for fin extensions on the males, and the tell tale sign of females is black ventral fins. The black ventral fins in females is true for all apistos I've come across. Your pH should be fine for any of those apistos, breeding might be another matter, as some species, the eggs wont hatch if the pH is not low enough. As for aggression the worst is actually a breeding female, she defends her nest and fry recklessly, might even bite your hand. Males are only bad in a small tank with no cover. They are fine with corys. I'd stay with 1 pair of cacatuoides to get your feet wet with apistos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
I've found that trios (1 male 2 or more females) work really well, rather than keeping pairs. The Apistos really like little hiding places, and you can cut the aggression by setting up the tank to include one more hidey hole than you have females. Also I've found that creating a visual barrier between the spots like tall plants, stones or driftwood helps keep the females from bothering each other so much. That way the females have their own spots to guard, and the male will flit from spot to spot displaying-makes for nice viewing :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK, more googling, it is unclear weather I would be better off with a pair, or two males. Not interested in breeding. lot of sites recommend pairs or 1 to 2. Some say 1 male is ok. trying to avoid agreesion of breeding female spawning. some say males will just fight another male and won't show much color without female. Also, would it be better to get males of a different species, like 1 cockatoo and an agasazii. Any advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
If your totally not interested in breeding (although you will miss out on some of their most interesting behaviors) You could just get 1 male and give him a small mirror to display for- He will show some intense coloration for his reflection. Also, you would be fine with multiple males of the same species or males of diffrent species. You could even do it african cichlid style and have like 100 males in a tank that size.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top