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Hey guys, so im slowly piecing together a pressurized CO2 system, and i plan on using a manifold to supply a few aquariums. I have seen it mentioned several times that to get the best most accurate bubble count you should keep the CO2 supply line as short as possible. Is that no matter what?

Most manifolds ive seen have the needle valves attached right to the manifold. What if you attached the tubing directly to the manifold and then had the needle valve set up in line right next to each tank? Would that make for a more precise accurate bubble count, or does the extra long tubing have an effect no matter where the valve is used?
 

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I'd like to drag this topic back up please....

I'm interested in using one regulator for two tanks. The distance between the two tanks will be ~6-10 feet.

So... If i'd like to use a two or three-way manifold, should the manifold be attached to the regulator, and then the long co2 line run to the remote tank? And then... at the remote tank, place a needle valve there?
I'm a little in the dark regarding a long-ish run for the co2 line.

Or, can you just split the lines at the regulator, use two needle valves, and just send the long line to the remote tank's diffuser?
 

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Ok... some more info then,

What's your take on using manifolds to split the lines?

How about splitting the line right out of the regulator with something like this? (item# 360154633039 on the 'bay)

Then at the outputs of this manifold, attach two sets of solenoid/valve/bubble counters? Or would it be better to split the lines, still with the manifold mentioned above, and then attach only solenoids to the regulator, and then run the valve/bubble counters inline at the remote tank? I'd like to supply two tanks with one regulator. The two tanks are about 6-10 feet apart.
I'm just wondering what the most efficient method will be. I've been reading that shorter co2 lines are the best idea, but it's just not practical in the application i'd like to use. I, for sure, don't want two whole pressurized systems going right now.

Thoughts and advice?
 

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I would always place the needle valve close to the regulator, and then do the long run to the tank. If you place the nv after a long run of tubing, it will take longer for the pressure to build up, and you might get some uneven CO2 flow, especially with flexible tubing.

I'd also use only one solenoid, and adjust the CO2 volume to various tanks via the needle valves.

I supply one tank with CO2 via a 25ft run of drip irrigation tubing. No issues with the long line. The CO2 just bubbles into a powerhead, so there is almost no pressure in that run.
 

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Thanks for the reply Wasserpest!

Both of the tanks i want to supply with CO2 are, roughly, on the same photo-period, so one solenoid would work.
I'm guessing that two solenoids on one regulator wouldn't work out that great? Makes sense, the more i think it through.
 

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Two solenoids could work, but you'd have three drawbacks --

1) Two solenoids are about twice as expensive as one.
2) Introduces additional complexity, and possible points of failure/leaks.
3) Many solenoids connect directly to the regulator, and most manifolds I have seen go after the solenoid, and some allow for easy connection to bubble counters. If you put the solenoids after the manifold you might end up with a slightly exotic setup. Nothing wrong with that of course, but try to explain that to your fellow tankers... :fish:
 

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I bought two solenoids, but really only because they were so cheap. I have to wire a power lead to them, but that's simple.
So i have a spare then, and that's always a good thing.
 

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I want to revive this thread from ancient history because I have a similar problem and can't seem to figure it out:
I have one CO2 canister and just got a 3 way distributor. The canister sits beside one planted tank and has been working great for 2 months. I have 2 other aquariums on the other side of the room and I tried to run a line across the ceiling to them but the pressure does not seem to be enough. I can open the needle valves wide open and still there is not enough pressure to the faraway tanks. The regulator is set at 42 working PSI, perhaps there is a screw to adjust it higher but I don't see one. I am left to think that the tubing should be changed out to proper CO2 tubing. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 

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I want to revive this thread from ancient history because I have a similar problem and can't seem to figure it out:
I have one CO2 canister and just got a 3 way distributor. The canister sits beside one planted tank and has been working great for 2 months. I have 2 other aquariums on the other side of the room and I tried to run a line across the ceiling to them but the pressure does not seem to be enough. I can open the needle valves wide open and still there is not enough pressure to the faraway tanks. The regulator is set at 42 working PSI, perhaps there is a screw to adjust it higher but I don't see one. I am left to think that the tubing should be changed out to proper CO2 tubing. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
When you say three way distributor, do you mean a splitter or gang valve? After a single needle valve?
 

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I want to revive this thread from ancient history because I have a similar problem and can't seem to figure it out:
I have one CO2 canister and just got a 3 way distributor. The canister sits beside one planted tank and has been working great for 2 months. I have 2 other aquariums on the other side of the room and I tried to run a line across the ceiling to them but the pressure does not seem to be enough. I can open the needle valves wide open and still there is not enough pressure to the faraway tanks. The regulator is set at 42 working PSI, perhaps there is a screw to adjust it higher but I don't see one. I am left to think that the tubing should be changed out to proper CO2 tubing. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Only real "leaky" tubing is silicone tubing.
Doesn't mean you couldn't have a small leak somewhere else though. Doesn't take much.



Does take time for the pressure to build on long runs so may be part of it.
 
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