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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in Florida, and we have these "dollar" weeds all over the place. I believe they are also called: Whorled Pennywort (Hydrocotyle verticillata ). Lemme get this straight, I can just dig one of these up and put them in my aquarium as an aquatic plant???

thanks,
WF
 

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Church, you live in Florida too, so you know exactly what i'm talking about... I can just dig one of these up out of a lawn and go to town! Isn't that crazy? It's not gonna get out of control and take over my tank will it?
 

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LOL, I like your enthusiasm! There's a member here, jaidexl, who has a "Florida-inspired" tank you might be interested in. I think he might have gotten some of the plants in it from his yard, I can't remember. I might be confusing that tank with another one. Nonetheless, here it is if you want to check it out.

But yeah, many people around here have done that very thing. It is pretty cool knowing that we live in an area of the world where aquatic plants do very well, whether native or introduced.

I couldn't tell you if the hydrocotyle will take over your tank, as I have yet to grow any of it yet, but I also have that growing all over my yard. Along with some bacopa monnieri, dwarf hairgrass, various sagitarria, and probably many more that I just haven't even seen yet. Of course, there is a natural pond/bog type of thing in my back yard.
 

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You should know, though, that if you take plants from the great outdoors, you are taking a chance on introducing critters, bugs, snails, diseases, etc into your aquarium. I doubt it's that big of a deal, but it should at least be stated. Most people do a potassium permanganate dip on them before bringing them inside. Or, you could just setup a tank dedicated to these outdoor plants, and not worry about killing any fish or anything like that.
 

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Children Boogie
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there are several species of pennywort. Some look better in the aquarium and some don't. The species you might have grows really tall and lanky out of the aquarium rather than staying low.
 

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Esteroali also has a native-collected tank going (she's in Estero, near Ft Myers. Ft Myers is where jaidexl is. I'm in Naples...). We've got lots of great species around- both native and invasive.

A friend of mine over in the UK told me recently that Proserpinaca (aka the Mermaidweed that literally chokes the canal in front of my office) over there goes for like $10-15 a bunch!
 

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there are several species of pennywort. Some look better in the aquarium and some don't. The species you might have grows really tall and lanky out of the aquarium rather than staying low.
While this is true, chances are, Whiskeyfox, that you have Hydrocotyle verticillata. I see it growing in almost everyone's yard all around central FL. And it does do well in a tank. I just can't tell you from personal experience how fast it grows, and how long it would take before it takes over the tank.

Here is a tank by one of my favorite aquascapers that shows how nice this Hydrocotyle can look in an aquascape.
 

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I'm jealous of all you Floridians. All Floridian's should have a native plant AND fish tank. So so so many species in Florida brackish, marine, and freshwater. I HATE LIVING IN MISSOURI! :wink:

Anyways, enjoy it!! I would have to get a chiller to keep most natives.
 

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We have the highest number of transplants moving into this state every day, so all you have to do is become one of them! ;)

I was born and raised here, and I still love it here. Chances are I'll be moving to the PNW someday, after my aging relatives are gone, but for now, I just love it here. How many people can say that about the place they lived in for over 30 years?

Anyway, if people want to start setting up FL native tanks, they better be prepared to invest in some large tanks, because generally speaking, aside from mosquito fish and livebearers, all our fish are HUGE and/or need lots of room! Ever checked out the folks' tanks over at monsterfishkeepers.com? Many of those tanks contain FL native fish.

I would love to have a bluegill tank someday... maybe I'll coincide that project with my future Florida Springs biotope tank...
 

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Natives

Man, you have at least 2 different types of pygmy sunfish, least killifish (livebearer), Flagfish( killi), Gold topminnows (killi), many other killis, I think orangespotted sunfish too. I've driven down a road inland and pulled over to check a ditch and an alligator snapping turtle walked right by me and the ditch was full of fish. I almost moved there that year! But now I can't because my gf wouldn't allow it. hehe.

You should get intouch with some guys from NANFA and they could show you some awesome spots to collect. :fish:
 

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Basically, though, you just proved my point. ;) All those killies you mentioned were what I was referring to under the umbrella of "livebearers" (I didn't want to get into listing them all, lol). And the pygmy sunfish, well, they are pygmy, but I'm pretty sure they still need room to move around, don't they? I've always understood all sunfish to need plenty of swimming room. But I admit I'm no expert on them.

But it's definitely cool that we have all these various killifish here that are popular in the hobby. It makes me proud to be Floridian.

I thought I had an alligator snapper in my pool once (there's a thread about it here at TPT, somewhere!). Turned out it was a softshell. Removing it was one of the most fun, memorable times of my life. It was just a comedy of errors. (You had to be there, lol).

edit: I just couldn't resist... I went back and found the thread so I could relive the moment.
 

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We have the highest number of transplants moving into this state every day, so all you have to do is become one of them! ;)

I was born and raised here, and I still love it here. Chances are I'll be moving to the PNW someday, after my aging relatives are gone, but for now, I just love it here. How many people can say that about the place they lived in for over 30 years?

Anyway, if people want to start setting up FL native tanks, they better be prepared to invest in some large tanks, because generally speaking, aside from mosquito fish and livebearers, all our fish are HUGE and/or need lots of room! Ever checked out the folks' tanks over at monsterfishkeepers.com? Many of those tanks contain FL native fish.

I would love to have a bluegill tank someday... maybe I'll coincide that project with my future Florida Springs biotope tank...

we have some small bluegill we caught in the Mississippi river along with some small bullhead catfish, gar, snakeheads and baby large mouth bass. I have to say bluegill are a very smart fish, we have them in a turtle tank and they manage to not be eaten. They just seem to be very aware of there surroundings. I wish I lived in Florida. I would have to get a in-ground pool that wouldn't be used for swimming, if you get what I'm saying lol. Maybe grandpa will give me one of his houses......i'm wishing.
 

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Native Missouri Fish

There are over 200 species of Missouri native fish. We have a lot to offer here but the problem is that 95% of them need much cooler water to thrive. Also, to breed them you have to imitate seasons which can be easy with light but difficult without a chiller to control temperature. Missouri has five species of killies, pigmy sunfish, mudminnows, orangespotted sunfish, dollar sunfish, and all types of cool stuff but you will have to work hard to keep the nicer ones.
 

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I took some pictures today of some aquatic plants growing in my yard that I just accidentally noticed, while bending down to tie my shoe. I couldn't think of where I would want to post the pics, but then I remembered this thread, and how we were specifically talking about these plants.

Anyway, the first pic is a collection of several plants, most obviously Hydrocotyle, but also what I believe is Bacopa monnieri, and then some type of clover-looking plant (which may or may not be aquatic). The second and third pics are closeups of the Hydrocotyle. These just grow like weeds in my yard.





I also have tons of dwarf hairgrass growing along the shores of the pond in the back yard, but there is a covering of duckweed these days that I can't see through enough to get a good shot. But I would like to show people how much dwarf hairgrass is just growing rampantly in my back yard, since it's easily over $100 worth on the swap n shop (well, it would be, if it wasn't covered in pond muck, turtle poop, and who knows what else?)
 
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