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How large is the tank, as the weight of the water within makes a huge difference? I am definitely not an expert, but I wouldn't worry about the bubbles. That if probably just a little trapped air from when they glued the pieces of glass together. I would be a little more worried about the chip in that first picture, but I do not think that would result in failure of the tank. I would fill the tank outside somewhere for a week or two and if there is no leaks, go for it. Hopefully someone with more knowledge of the physics of glass will come along with better info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How large is the tank, as the weight of the water within makes a huge difference? I am definitely not an expert, but I wouldn't worry about the bubbles. That if probably just a little trapped air from when they glued the pieces of glass together. I would be a little more worried about the chip in that first picture, but I do not think that would result in failure of the tank. I would fill the tank outside somewhere for a week or two and if there is no leaks, go for it. Hopefully someone with more knowledge of the physics of glass will come along with better info.
Ah good point, I should have posted the dimensions. It's 29 gallons (106L), 76.2L x 30.48D x 45.72H (lengthwise is 2.5ft).

Unfortunately as I'm in an apartment I don't have an outside space to use for it.. 😅
 

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The bubbles are silicone separation. Take some pictures with a ruler next to the bubbles. Check every so often referring back to the picture (using the same ruler, this matters) and see if the bubbles are growing. If they ever get bigger or new ones form, your tank is about to fail.

If this is a brand new tank I'd be looking for a refund. I am assuming this is a used tank though. A 29 gallon tank is not super big. I'd be tempted to just run with it, but it also depends on how tight your budget is for this tank. If funds allow, the safest option is to buy a new tank. If funds don't allow, then monitor closely using the picture method I mentioned.
 

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While 29G is not a huge tank, it is more water than I would want on the floor. I knew more educated people would come along to help soon. Good luck with whatever path you choose and update the thread later with pics of the completed tank.
 

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Silicone separation on a rimless tank would keep me up at night. Not worth it IMO. It could last for a decade or it could explode within a week. Nobody is going to be able to tell you for sure if the tank will hold or not, just give you an idea for who would be willing to tolerate that risk vs others.
 

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Looks typical for a used or DIY rimless tank. Also typical in the entry level commercial tanks like Aqueon. Just based on my own experiences, I would say that it is perfectly fine to use.

For some additional data points:
I had a 29g tank with a glass chip right in one of the lower corners. I water tested it for a couple of weeks and it was fine. Then plans changed and I decided to try and sell it, and it sat with water in it for another 6 months, with no issues. Your chip looks to be on the outside edge, and doesn't appear to be deep. I would just turn that edge to the back and forget about it.
I also had a entry level commercial 50g for a couple of years with bubbles in the silicone of the joining edges, just like the ones in yours. Mine were all in the corners (black-rimmed tank so I couldn't see the bottom seams). Zero issues.
I also had a 130g tank made by a DIY tank builder back in 2009ish. When I moved out of my parent's house, instead of moving it with me, I just gave it to them. It's had small bubbles in every joining edge of the silicone since I got it. I was inexperienced and thought it was normal. Anyway, it's been up and running since the day I got it. Zero issues. It actually outlasted a commercially made 45g hex tank, that one was maybe 7 or 8 years old before it finally blew a seal.

Given your space and situation, I would fill it with maybe 5-10 gallons for a few days to check for leaks. Measure the bubbles as minorhero suggested. Then fill to 2/3rds for a few days. Check for leaks and measure bubbles. Then fill to regular water level for a week or two, check for leaks and measure bubbles. If there are no changes, I'd say you're in the clear.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't run that aquarium, since it has two flags (the scallop chip and the potential for silicone separation). 29 gallons is a lot of water when it's on your floor
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just curious. What kind of mat is that underneath the tank?
It's EVA foam mats, cut to fit. (I am bad at cutting)

Looks typical for a used or DIY rimless tank. Also typical in the entry level commercial tanks like Aqueon. Just based on my own experiences, I would say that it is perfectly fine to use.

For some additional data points:
I had a 29g tank with a glass chip right in one of the lower corners. I water tested it for a couple of weeks and it was fine. Then plans changed and I decided to try and sell it, and it sat with water in it for another 6 months, with no issues. Your chip looks to be on the outside edge, and doesn't appear to be deep. I would just turn that edge to the back and forget about it.
I also had a entry level commercial 50g for a couple of years with bubbles in the silicone of the joining edges, just like the ones in yours. Mine were all in the corners (black-rimmed tank so I couldn't see the bottom seams). Zero issues.
I also had a 130g tank made by a DIY tank builder back in 2009ish. When I moved out of my parent's house, instead of moving it with me, I just gave it to them. It's had small bubbles in every joining edge of the silicone since I got it. I was inexperienced and thought it was normal. Anyway, it's been up and running since the day I got it. Zero issues. It actually outlasted a commercially made 45g hex tank, that one was maybe 7 or 8 years old before it finally blew a seal.

Given your space and situation, I would fill it with maybe 5-10 gallons for a few days to check for leaks. Measure the bubbles as minorhero suggested. Then fill to 2/3rds for a few days. Check for leaks and measure bubbles. Then fill to regular water level for a week or two, check for leaks and measure bubbles. If there are no changes, I'd say you're in the clear.
Thanks for the input. That gives me some confidence. This tank definitely looks like a DIY job, the edges are butted unevenly - 2 edges are actually butted and the other two are.. not so even. I filled it halfway and let it sit for 24 hours and it was fine, and yesterday I filled it a little more so it's around 75% full. I'm still waiting for parts to build my sump so I can let this sit for a while. Fingers crossed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Just an update on this since it's been a month since I filled it, the tank is holding fine! I need to move it and the shelf it's sitting on now to another wall as it's right underneath the circuit breaker box (I live in an apartment) and I figured it would not be a great idea to have a tank full of water under it. Will probably make a new journal thread when I start the build proper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So I got a bit spooked after seeing a reddit post where they hid their tanks during a rental inspection, and I don't want to deal with the stress of it possibly exploding a few months down the line.. So I'm gonna just use it as a plant hothouse or maybe a marbled gecko enclosure ;;
 
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