The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I have a fairly new 10 gallon tank I'm planting. In it I have an anubias nana, 2 (soon to be 4) small marimo moss balls, a bit of java moss, and a java fern.
I bought my java fern about 1 month ago. When I got it I could tell it had some brown spots, but it didn't look like a big deal and honestly I kind of liked them because they gave the plant a little rusted look. However, now the Splotches have become huge, covering over half of my biggest leaves. At first I suspected melt, so I moves the plant to a corner of the tank and put a piece of cardboard behind it to stop extra light from coming in.
Then I did some more research on melt in java ferns and stopped suspecting that because my plant is not mushy or see-through whatsoever. The plant seems healthy, it's producing baby plants, making more leaves constantly, and is firm (not mushy or slimy). It just has large, dark brown splotches.

Does anyone know why this is?
Pardon my bad English, it is my second language. Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Is there any way you can post pictures? I'm thinking it's either a nutrient deficiency or diatoms, but those are very different problems with different solutions. Could also just be because of the formation of the baby plants.

If you can answer the questions below, it will help figure out what is going on.

Can you rub/scrape off the brown, or is it the actual leaf changing color?

If the leaf color is changing, do you see any other colors as well, like yellow or black, and does the leaf feel bumpy or rough in the brown area?

Is this only happening on old leaves, and is it specifically happening in areas where new baby plants are starting to grow? (Java ferns produce baby plants on the leaf of the mother plant. The roots of the baby plants are brown and will cover the leaf surface. The mother leaf also will often start to turn dark and get holes after producing the baby plants. If this is the reason, then nothing is wrong and you can just remove the ugly leaves once the babies are big enough to grow on their own.)

How much light does the tank get? Does it get sunlight from a window, do you have a regular aquarium hood light, or do you use a grow light? How many hours of light does it get? If you know the brand and model of the light you use that helps too.

Do you use any fertilizer for your aquarium? If you do, what are you adding and how much?

Java ferns are pretty easy to grow, so I think your plants will be ok, but no one wants ugly brown leaves. If you can get a good picture, that will help a lot though with figuring out the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is there any way you can post pictures? I'm thinking it's either a nutrient deficiency or diatoms, but those are very different problems with different solutions. Could also just be because of the formation of the baby plants.

If you can answer the questions below, it will help figure out what is going on.

Can you rub/scrape off the brown, or is it the actual leaf changing color?

If the leaf color is changing, do you see any other colors as well, like yellow or black, and does the leaf feel bumpy or rough in the brown area?

Is this only happening on old leaves, and is it specifically happening in areas where new baby plants are starting to grow? (Java ferns produce baby plants on the leaf of the mother plant. The roots of the baby plants are brown and will cover the leaf surface. The mother leaf also will often start to turn dark and get holes after producing the baby plants. If this is the reason, then nothing is wrong and you can just remove the ugly leaves once the babies are big enough to grow on their own.)

How much light does the tank get? Does it get sunlight from a window, do you have a regular aquarium hood light, or do you use a grow light? How many hours of light does it get? If you know the brand and model of the light you use that helps too.

Do you use any fertilizer for your aquarium? If you do, what are you adding and how much?

Java ferns are pretty easy to grow, so I think your plants will be ok, but no one wants ugly brown leaves. If you can get a good picture, that will help a lot though with figuring out the problem.
1. Its the leaf.
2. there is some light greenish brown where the dark brown is starting to take over the green and the dark brown areas do feel a little bumpier/tougher than the green areas.
3. It's on most leaves, but there is more on older leaves.
4.It's on just about every leaf, I don't see a difference between leaf that has a baby and leaf that doesn't.
5. window and a marineland brand hood light. I have no idea the model, it came with the 10 gallon used tank i bough off craigslist.
6.the tank gets 11-12 hours of fake light fri-sun, and 13-14 hours mon-thurs. It gets about 6 hours of window light each day.
7. I don't fertilize
8.I will try to get a picture up tomorrow, I am in bed now and don't want to wake my family up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Update: The plant hasn't gotten better or worse, but I've made the discovery that the plants with the most baby plants growing out of them are the least brown looking. Because of this i'm thinking, maybe the plant is just pulling nutrients from leaves that don't need it as much and putting it towards the "mothering" leaves?

I'm going to try to get some liquid fertilizer. Any good brand you guys suggest?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
There are a lot of options, but if you're going for easy-to-use and easy-to-find, both Seachem and API make aquarium fertilizers that are readily available at most shops. I've had good luck with using Seachem Flourish and API Leaf Zone (both at the same time: Flourish is micronutrients and Leaf Zone is potassium & iron).

Plants need nitrogen (usually provided sufficiently by your fish), phosphorus (usually already sufficient in a normal aquarium), potassium, iron, and micronutrients.

If any of these items are missing, then eventually the plant will stop growing and usually dies, and if these nutrients are in low quantities then plants will grow slowly. Any fertilizers that supply the last three on the list will work fine.

Just don't over-do it, as that will usually lead to algae. Since the kinds of plants in your tank are naturally slow-growing and you aren't planted super heavily, I suggest dosing half as much as is recommended on the bottles.

Also, you're right, those brown leaves are getting cannibalized by the plants. I recommend cutting the worst leaves off so they don't start growing algae. Since you're going to start feeding the plants, they don't need those old dying leaves anymore, and the plants will start growing nice new ones soon.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top