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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We were really pleased when the pair of kribs we got bred almost immediately! Probably a hundred fry or more! But that was a couple of weeks ago and now I don't see any. :( Could we have lost them all? The only other stock in the tank are neons, diamond tetras, a few assassin snails and a lone male platy. Water checks out fine though it did have a very slight touch of ammonia. (I was worried about hoovering the bottom of the tank too much as I didn't want to accidentally suck them up!) Any ideas?
 

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Sorry to hear about that. I've had generation after generation of Kribs. One of my favorite fish.

I've never done anything in particular to help the parents keep their fry other than feeding a bit of extra food so everyone in the tank isn't "hungry". As aggressive as my parents have always been, I find it hard to believe that any significant number of the fry could have been eaten, much less all of them.

Sadly I can't offer too much help, but I can tell you once the first brood has been started, the following broods will be pretty regular. Depending on what size tank you have, you'll likely have to find them all new homes. In my experience, once the following brood is on the way, the parents won't recognize the previous brood as anything other than intruders and they will kill them just like any other perceived threat. In a big enough tank this may not happen as the juveniles have somewhere else to go.

Hang in there, more babies will be on the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hmmm....well, we really didn't give the tank much extra food (standard tropical flake) and as it is a really deep tank it is possible that not much made it to the bottom. :(

I'm not sure what you mean about the filter, Bender? It's a tray one that came with the set up, the kind that channels the water through chambers of filter media across the top of the tank.

Bandit, how often to krib's spawn? Any idea of when I should be looking out for my next batch? The female has made a new cave under a piece of driftwood now so I'm wondering if they weren't happy with the old situation? The tank is around 55 gallon so hopefully big enough for everyone to get along in peace for a while!
 

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I never documented the actual times, so I'm just guessing here, but it seems like it was never more than a couple months between broods. You'll likely see a new batch sooner than that seeing as the first one was unsuccessful.

In the 55 you'll likely see a much larger population of juveniles than I had in my 29. Eventually you'll need to thin them out or the parents most likely will do it for you. After mine started spawning, the only other fish I was able to keep in there was the pleco and some of the juvenile kribs that stayed as far from the spawning site as they could.

I recently bought a house and am in the process of setting up some much larger and more numerous tanks and would love to get some more kribs. There's a 125 in the back room now, and I just filled up a 75 for the living room. I have to get it planted for now, then I'll start considering some livestock. I think a pair of kribs would definitely be a nice choice for me again.
 

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I use hikari sinking algae wafers to feed my fry at first that way the parents can keep them grazing on it all day.After that decapsulated brine shrimp eggs with a long feeding straw. Also if when the lights go out and the room is completely dark sometimes mama can't find all the fry to lead them back to their cave for the night. I make sure there is ambient light when the tank turns off. I keep cardinal tetras with my Kribs and they do make some passes at the fry but the parents are pretty good protectors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'll definitely look into those wafers. Sounds like a good idea about the ambient lighting as well. The cloud of fry did seem to like to roam!

Bandit, on the whole we're really pleased with our choice. We took them because they were so colourful at the LFS and definitely full of personality but the more we learn, the more we like! I'd be really happy to keep them breeding! :)
 

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Kribs breed like rabbits. Probably the only species of fish that I've seen breed more rapidly was the convict cichlid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OMG! OMG! OMG!!! :D :D :D

I just saw the cloud of fry again tonight! So I didn't lose them after all! YAY!!!!

Thanks so much to everyone for their help. I'll make sure I put a bit of extra food in there now and will keep you all posted on how it goes!! <3
 

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A friend of mine has some kribs. He kept losing the fry batch after batch and couldn't figure it out. Finally he seperated the male from mom and the fry and figured out the male was eating the fry to get the female to breed again. Now every batch he just seperates them for a while and all is good again. Here is his article from our club newsletter. With permission of course
Breeding the Pelvicachromis pulcher AKA ‘Kribensis’ or ‘Kribs’
By Tom Heisler
I received a young trio of Kribs from a fellow club member. I placed them in a planted 29 gallon tank with some Cory cats, Ancistrus, and Bosemani Rainbows and left them to their new home. They would usually hang around the bottom half of the tank with the exception of feeding time when they would rise to the top to compete for food with the Rainbows.
One day I saw the male protecting a section of driftwood and I decided to investigate. There were multiple fry under the driftwood and the female was protecting them from below while the male took watch on the upper side of the driftwood. I fed these guys crushed flake by wetting it first and blow- ing it through a tube in their general vicinity. I also used the tube method to feed them brine shrimp.
I observed them picking at some java moss which I would imagine contained tiny critters too small for my eyes to see. Approximately ten days later I noticed the fry had disappeared. I wondered if I had- n’t fed them enough or not enough variety off food. Approximately 25-30 days later I noticed another school of fry and the parents were in their protective mode as before. Around ten days later the fry were gone again! I had a suspicion that the male was eating the fry so he could breed again.
Approximately 25-30 days later, like clockwork, there were more fry swimming around in the tank. This time I removed the male and I also removed the other female of the trio that was not protecting the fry which left one female to protect the fry from the other fish in the tank. This time I was able to successfully raise the fry.
The two Kribs that were removed were placed in a ten gallon tank with some Aulonocara fry and some caves. Here is where it gets interesting! About three days later I noticed eggs in the cave where the female resides and I thought to myself this lucky male really gets around! A day or two later I no- ticed the eggs were gone and I thought the male ate them again. I then noticed the male in a cave de- fending the eggs. He had stolen them from the female! A day or two later I did not see the eggs again so, of course, I thought the male had eaten them. I looked in a cave where the female was residing and saw a few wigglers in there. The female had stolen her eggs back! The next day I saw the wig- glers in a cave with the male again. A few days later all the fry were gone which is what I should have expected. If I had a suitable housing for the male I would have removed him and probably would be raising a second batch of fry but in my fish room there always seems to be a shortage of tanks or tank space. As I write this, the trio are still in the ten gallon tank. It has been well over two months and I have not seen any eggs lately. Once the fry in the planted tank are large enough where they cannot be eaten by the father, I plan to re-introduce the trio back into the planted tank as they seem happier in that one.
In conclusion, my recipe for breeding Kribs is a planted tank, a hollow piece of driftwood or a cave where the parents can spawn, and removal of the male once the fry are free swimming.
 

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+1. Although if you get four or six fish and let them pair up on their own, you'll usually get a pair that gets along. My pair work as a perfect team to defend their young from the time the eggs are laid to when the fry are about 1/2 inches. Then they start trying to chase the fry away, and that's when I know to remove the little ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Oh wow! Great article! Hmm...25-30 days? Makes me wonder if they are the same fry or a new batch. I think I definitely need to keep an eye on them and maybe isolate the male. He seems to be defending them but I'm going to have to have another look now. Thank you so much for such a great article!!
 

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The parents killing the juveniles is what I was referring to in my earlier post when I said you have to take them out when it's time for them to spawn again or they'll start killing them. I always had so many juveniles that I didn't think it was that big a deal to lose some that didn't get the hint from mom and dad.

Glad to hear you found them/got some more fry. You got me wanting to find another pair when I get the 75 set up and cycled.
 
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