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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok should I be worried about this situation?

My tank is 3 weeks old, heavy planted, 75 gal, inj co2 etc, ...
Fish stock is at 6 SAES, Recently added 6 Ottos and 3 Yoyo's...

I just tested my water today and was as follows:

Ph 6.4
GH 8
kh 7-8
0-nitrate
0-ammonia
25ppm nitrite!

I am dosing EI method and dose KNO3 3/4 tsp. on M W F...

should I be worried about the 25ppm Nitrite? Should I reduce the KNO3 ferts? I have a few decaying leaves in the tank nothing major...

I do weekly water changes I would est. at 25 to 30%

Do I need to start water changes twice a week?

The fish seem fine and show no signs of stress...

Does this mean the tank is not fully cycled yet?

thnaks
 

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Does this mean the tank is not fully cycled yet?
umm. yes. But that seems like a ridiculous amount of nitrite--test kits (unless you sling around some dough) are notoriously inaccurate. Anyway, 3 weeks isn't that long unless you used some substrate/filter material from an established tank.

Are any of the inhabitants showing distress?

I see massive water-changes in your future.
 

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just realized it's probably .25ppm, but it should still be zero. imo, the more water changes the better--daily if you can. 25-50% with dechlorinated water.

It's strange you're not seeing any NO3 reading with your dosing....
 

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Do a water change. Nitrite can do permanent damage to the fish. I know otos are fairly delicate, I'm not sure they will last long with measurable nitrites.
 

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Does anyone really believe that a cheap nitrite test kit can be relied upon to distinguish between .25 ppm and zero ppm? It is highly unlikely that you have that much, if any, nitrite in the water. Just by having the tank heavily planted, and I am assuming it really is heavily planted, you can be sure there is a very small probability that you have any nitrite at all in the water. The nitrite would be there because the ammonia from the fish waste is being converted to nitrite, but with a heavily planted tank, the plants consume the ammonia before any can be converted to nitrite.

My advice would be to put the nitrite test kit back on the shelf, and just enjoy the aquarium for now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hoppy... Cool advice! The test kit is the cheap A.P.I. One... The color is really hard to read as it is not quite purple (which would indicate .25ppm) but not really at 0ppm ... The tank is very heavily planets with several fast growers, wisteria, hygro a., bacopa m. And ludwiga... Maybe I'm just way too parinoid. Thanks:icon_smil
 

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Children Boogie
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your NO3 reading is 0ppm even though you're dosing KNO3. I'd say your test kit is wonky.
Just keep an eye out for the fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
your NO3 reading is 0ppm even though you're dosing KNO3. I'd say your test kit is wonky.
Just keep an eye out for the fish.
So if KNO3 is directly related to the rise of nitrites then why am I dosing 3/4tsp per the EI method? Should I cut out the KNO3 entirely or just reduce the amount? Confused?
 

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Children Boogie
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So if KNO3 is directly related to the rise of nitrites then why am I dosing 3/4tsp per the EI method? Should I cut out the KNO3 entirely or just reduce the amount? Confused?
no, kno3 has nothing to do with nitrites. I'm just saying your test kit is probably unreliable because the Nitrate test should have read the KNO3.

Plants need Nitrogen, KNO3 is one way for plants to get N... They will also take up NH3/4, NO3 and probably nitrites ( NO2 ) too.

Bacteria also need Nitrogen. One will take in NH3/4 and the waste product is NO2 (nitrite). And another will take in NO2 and the waste product is NO3. This is the cycling process.
 
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