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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be switching over my 40b to a new 59g rimless and would like to eliminate my mini ramshorn before I infect my new tank.
I've read a couple posts about how hard these things are to kill and it seems added seltzer water might do it.
I already cut feeding down to 1 time a day to every other day. ( 2 harlequin rasbora only inhabitants.)
How much seltzer water should I use? Will it affect any plants more then others?

I would be removing the fish to a quarantine tank .

I had few of these buggers then switch to pool filter sand as substrate and their population exploded, guessing due to all the diatom algae.
 

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Carbonated water isn't going to do the trick. Most of it will off-gas before it makes it beyond the water's surface. Even turning up pressurized CO2 probably won't nuke them. If you want to eradicate snails instead of putting in the effort to control their population - not just cutting feeding - you'll need to use something that's copper-based. Just know that you may never be able to keep shrimp, snails or other invertebrates in that tank again if you go this route. And know that you'll need to remove the snails as they die to prevent parameters from getting outta whack.

You've been at this hobby long enough to know that quick fixes are almost never good when it comes to planted tanking. It'd be a lot safer and healthier for the tank if you set food traps for a couple weeks. Make sure there's little algae, no waste, nothing decaying. That will work out much better in the long run.
 

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Just chiming in to say that the snail traps work really well with some blanched lettuce. Do a black out with the trap in and leave it overnight. Surprisingly efficient.
 

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I think the safest and easiest way to get rid of snails is to introduce a snail-eating fish and diligently looking for and removing their eggs.

You could also quarantine your plants to wait out the eggs.

I know it's all very personal, but I just live with snails. Haven't found ramshorns to be an issue.
 

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I had a pond snail (the small fast replicating ones) infestation once and a combination of traps, diligently picking them out with tongs etc... worked. Took over a month but it did work.
 

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I can't believe the effort people go through to remove snails. I would never do anything chemically. Snails simply don't become a nusiance if the food source is contained. If the population is exploding they can act as a test kit of sorts in that it would indicate the tank needs more maintenance, less food. I've dumped everything from mini ramshorn to bladder in my tank without any worry and there's always just a few here and there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Carbonated water isn't going to do the trick. Most of it will off-gas before it makes it beyond the water's surface. Even turning up pressurized CO2 probably won't nuke them. If you want to eradicate snails instead of putting in the effort to control their population - not just cutting feeding - you'll need to use something that's copper-based. Just know that you may never be able to keep shrimp, snails or other invertebrates in that tank again if you go this route. And know that you'll need to remove the snails as they die to prevent parameters from getting outta whack.

You've been at this hobby long enough to know that quick fixes are almost never good when it comes to planted tanking. It'd be a lot safer and healthier for the tank if you set food traps for a couple weeks. Make sure there's little algae, no waste, nothing decaying. That will work out much better in the long run.
Dang though it might work as I break the tank down. I'm going to be removing everything and just pick through the plants in a bucket.

Definitely don't want to use copper just in case.
I think the safest and easiest way to get rid of snails is to introduce a snail-eating fish and diligently looking for and removing their eggs.

You could also quarantine your plants to wait out the eggs.

I know it's all very personal, but I just live with snails. Haven't found ramshorns to be an issue.
I just didn't want to add fish for the purpose of snail remove because they don't go with the region of fish I would like to keep.
I can't believe the effort people go through to remove snails. I would never do anything chemically. Snails simply don't become a nusiance if the food source is contained. If the population is exploding they can act as a test kit of sorts in that it would indicate the tank needs more maintenance, less food. I've dumped everything from mini ramshorn to bladder in my tank without any worry and there's always just a few here and there.
I barely feed and they really were not an issue till I replaced the substrate causing a diatom bloom. They are all over the sand and plants it just looks messy and I rather they not be there since I never intended to have snails. I'f they are larger and not an eyesore I wouldn't mind.

It seems monte carlo doesn't like sand with flourish root tabs. I won't be keeping sand in my next setup.

All the specs in the sand are mini ramshorn.
 

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Honestly, it looks like you should leave everything alone. Let them balance out. Their numbers will dwindle quickly.

If you truly hate them, just set a food trap. Beyond that, you really don't have that much to worry about. They'll for real begin to disappear.

If it were me and I hated them (I never hate snails)? I'd trap them all and give them to other forum members. People will snatch them up quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Might try a potassium permaganate dip as you move the plants over. It always worked wonders for me. If you plant to have any inverts in the new tank you will have to do something to neutralize the PP before putting them in the new tank.
From other post on this site pp doesn't affect mini ramshorn like other snails
 

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I barely feed and they really were not an issue till I replaced the substrate causing a diatom bloom. They are all over the sand and plants it just looks messy and I rather they not be there since I never intended to have snails. I'f they are larger and not an eyesore I wouldn't mind.

It seems monte carlo doesn't like sand with flourish root tabs. I won't be keeping sand in my next setup.

All the specs in the sand are mini ramshorn.
Yeah, could be any organics doesn't have to be food, if you got diatoms from the substrate change that will do it as well. I would just wait it out, keep up good maintenance and they'll be gone. I do agree the mini ramshorn are the king of the "pest" snails, they are the most annoying in numbers, but they will go down dramatically if you keep organics to a minimum.
 

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Alum powder from the spice aisle instantly kills them and if you soak your plants in it for a couple of days, will also kill the eggs.
 

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I had some rather large planarians, 3,8" to 1/2" long show up in a 10 gallon tank. Biggest planarians I've seen in my tanks and I've been breeding fish for 59 years. They freaked me out.
This tank is stocked with about 100 blood red shrimp of all sizes and a pair of rare French Guiana killies, Laimosemion xiphidius. It is densely planted with Najas guadelupensis, Anubias barteri and Subwassertang.
I treated the tank with about 250 mg flubendazole 5% for 5 days.
I lost 4 or 5 shrimp and noticed many withered Planaria by the next day.
By day 5 all the snails appeared dead. Species of snails included Red Ramshorn, mini-ramshorn and MTS's.
I changed 50% of the water on day 6 and then resumed my usual 25% water change per week.
This was the first time I'd ever used such a high dose of flubendazole in a planted tank with invertebrates. I've used lower(normal) doses in other tanks many times in the past to eliminate Hydra without harming snails or shrimp.
Over the years I've used flubendazole to successfully treat velvet disease, Ich, Hydra, Planaria, internal parasites and now, snails.
Flubendazole is of the most useful and lower toxicity medications available to aquarium hobbyists, IMO.
 
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