The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I have those dreaded bladder snails that reproduce so fast. I would like to know if I smash/crush them in the tank, will that produce more baby snails in the tank?

I’m trying to kill the small ones before they get to reproducing age. Sometimes they are just too small to remove unless I stick hand into the tank. I use long tweezer to crush them instead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
Problem with crushing them is that it leaves a lot of dead bodies decomposing in the tank, and hence a potential spike in ammonia that may harm your other livestock.

Maybe try leaving bait (lettuce leaves?) in the tank overnight and remove the leaves + attached snails in the morning?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Most people have established tanks, but a freshwater pea puffer fish is supposed to eat them like crazy. Never had one, but darn cute. I'm sure there are other predators who eat them, even assassin snails.
Also the bait traps en7jos mentioned work, but may need to be diligent. Look online as to how to make them out of a plastic water bottle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
cory cats will eat them

Problem with crushing them is that it leaves a lot of dead bodies decomposing in the tank, and hence a potential spike in ammonia that may harm your other livestock.

Maybe try leaving bait (lettuce leaves?) in the tank overnight and remove the leaves + attached snails in the morning?
If you have Cory Cats, they will gladly eat the smashed snails.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
I had had some loaches (I can’t remember which type) for a while in mine and they must have ate almost all of them
Within a week!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
My angles used to snap them up as they fell crushed. In fact they would sit under my finger waiting for me to crush a snail ;)


Problem with crushing them is that it leaves a lot of dead bodies decomposing in the tank, and hence a potential spike in ammonia that may harm your other livestock.

Maybe try leaving bait (lettuce leaves?) in the tank overnight and remove the leaves + attached snails in the morning?
Bump: Clown loach, golden zebra, yoyo, zebra, and similar will eat them. zebra loaches are actually under-rated. They are a bit calmer than yoyo and a bit smaller. Only problem is they can be a bit shy at time so you might not see them for a while but given enough they will come out and play. If you do get yoyo or gold zebra; you have to cover every hole no matter how small as they love to jump. I've not observed my zebra loaches jumping.

I had had some loaches (I can’t remember which type) for a while in mine and they must have ate almost all of them
Within a week!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,420 Posts
I just don't understand snail hate. Snails are as natural as algae and mulm and are a valuable member of the cleanup crew. Their population is influenced by the available resources. If you have too many, it's probably due to overfeeding.
There are snail traps available, but I've always let nature take it's course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Why do you want to get rid of them? They only eat decaying material, the population is only as big as there is leftover food to eat, and they’re a great indicator of tank health. And they don’t lay ugly eggs on the glass. I have them in my tanks and love them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
The oft-repeated mantra that too many snails is due to over-feeding is, I believe, nonsense (outside of advising a complete beginner with a techni-coloured gravel goldfish bowl!). This is the Planted Tank Forum right? Planted tanks have soil and plants and that in itself is enough to support a healthy snail population. When you get snails in your allotment, does anybody suggest that you are over-feeding the birds?

Sure there must be available food to feed the snail population, but to suggest those with snails are pouring bucketful's of fish food into their tanks is probably not helpful. I strongly suspect (based on recent experience) that a tank with nothing but Amazonia in it (no fish, no fish food, maybe even no plants) is more than enough to support a snail population explosion!

I have shrimp tank that are barely fed and the proliferation of snail babies seems to directly correlate with shrimp breeding. Snails and shrimp eat the same thing, so you can't starve one out of existence without impacting the other. Both come to the same party when there is food offered!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
You can make a very effective snail trap for 99 cents. That'll take care of the "plague" but leave a small batch they're great for the ecosystem and if balanced they won't overpopulate.

I've been looking for some since mine expired after about a year. Would love to take some off your hands!

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
The oft-repeated mantra that too many snails is due to over-feeding is, I believe, nonsense (outside of advising a complete beginner with a techni-coloured gravel goldfish bowl!). This is the Planted Tank Forum right? Planted tanks have soil and plants and that in itself is enough to support a healthy snail population. When you get snails in your allotment, does anybody suggest that you are over-feeding the birds?

Sure there must be available food to feed the snail population, but to suggest those with snails are pouring bucketful's of fish food into their tanks is probably not helpful. I strongly suspect (based on recent experience) that a tank with nothing but Amazonia in it (no fish, no fish food, maybe even no plants) is more than enough to support a snail population explosion!

I have shrimp tank that are barely fed and the proliferation of snail babies seems to directly correlate with shrimp breeding. Snails and shrimp eat the same thing, so you can't starve one out of existence without impacting the other. Both come to the same party when there is food offered!
I can attest to this. I have a 10 gallon that had no fish in it, just plants, a few pond snails and a single assassin. I had to leave for a few months and no food or attention was paid to this tank. When i came back I had 10 assassins (and a bunch more eggs) and 100's of pond snails. In a planted tank, they can thrive without the addition of any food at all.

Certainly the lack of maintenance created the food for them, but to the point being made it's not always (or even often maybe) about the food being added to the tank but other variables seems wise.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top