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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I'm investigating adding killifish to my tank. I know barely anything about the fish, but I'm fairly certain I'd like to try a non-annual and nothing bigger than 3" or so. I've got a 36 g tank with somewhere around a dozen Corydoras Aeneus (breeding happily when eggs survive), a pair of dwarf puffers (who murder eggs and anything that looks offensive), Endlers (declining sharply in population), and a pair of angelfish (who have become too efficient eating endler fry). The tank is heavily planted with dwarf swords and I'm looking to add some frog bit or water lettuce, since I cannot get pennywort to thrive floating. The water is hard (N. Arizona), but every fish has thrived. I'm going to yank the angels out and I'd like to put killifish in. Can anyone recommend a killifish that can handle harder water, won't be too murderous to Endler fry, are S. American (preferably Venezuelan), and easily breed-able?
 

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South American non annual that will tolerate hard water means fish in the former genus Rivulus . (see here for a brief description of what a mess the genus has become https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rivulus ) Some of these are almost laughably easy to breed , like tenius , cryptocallus , and harti . But not in a community tank . They jump , you need a good cover . As NEL said they're also likely to regard endler fry as snack food . So you might be out of luck . Just as a FYI , there's an affiliate club of the AKA in Arizona , (Phoenix ? ) Check out the AKA website (American Killifish Association | The Oldest National Tropical Fish Organization in the World) to see if they have contact info .
 

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Thanks a bunch. I'm not truly worried about the Endler fry, normally there are so many that even if the killifish are the most incredible predator fish in the world, it'll be no issue. The angels are eating my fully grown endless now, which is the issue.

There's a terrifying amount of information on killifish spawning. Are any of the Rivulus and related fish the sort where I can basically just dump eggs in a breeder box and feed until their big enough for the full tank?
 

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Well , first you've gotta get the eggs . Usually this is accomplished via separating the pair into a smaller tank , with a mop . Feed heavy and pick eggs daily from the mop . See here : http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/21-fish/813817-how-breed-aphyosemion-killifish.html .I don't think a breeder box will work out too well if it's the type with slots in the bottom as is used for livebearers . The fry might slip out . A better idea would be to place the newly hatched fry into a small tank , maybe a 5 , with 1/2 inch or so of tank water . When you have a dozen or so fry , start raising the water level in the tank by adding a quart or so of tank water daily until the tank is full .This'll take a couple of weeks . Then keep feeding the fry until they're 1/2 inch or so . If you have lots of plants in your big tank , drop them in . You might lose a few , but I don't think the puffers will bother them at this size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I expressed myself poorly, I meant to say that if I purchased just eggs could I hatch them in a mesh breeder box and get the killifish up to 1/4" or so before letting them free in the tank?
 

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It MIGHT work , assuming the mesh was fine enough . Don't know offhand of anyone who's done it . Plastic shoe box or Petco/smart critter keeper type small tank is a better option , though ,if you have the space. Either way , I'd hatch the eggs in a small jar/petri dish , just to be able to keep an eye on , and remove , any that might fungus ; and then use an eyedropper with some airline attached to move the fry into the box.
 
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