The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all! First off, I'd like to say thank you for the knowledge available here. This is my first post, but I've referred to this site many times as I've grown in the hobby.

Killifish have been a special interest of mine, but seemed intimidating with their unique requirements and the difficulty of raising the fry. Lately, I've kept micro fish in various planted tanks and after a recent success with breeding my Gertrudae rainbowfish, I feel finally ready to take the plunge!

I've decided to start with eggs and recently began researching in earnest on what exactly I would need to do. I have a 2.5 and a 10 gallon I can dedicate to the raising of the fry. I will be using RO water that I can treat with peat if necessary. I've started propagating extra java moss for the nursery tank and have Artemia eggs on hand for when they hatch. I'd love to hear any tips/ nuggets of knowledge anyone has to offer.
I looked into species that would be appropriate for a beginner and I've (somewhat) narrowed it down to:

Fp .Gardneri, Fp. Spoorenbergi,
A. Striatum, A. Ogoense, and A. Bivittatum.

I was drawn to many of the SA Annuals (esp. Austrolebias) however, I feel the fry may be too delicate for a first timer like me. If there's any other species someone would recommend, I'm all ears.

My main issue is that I'm having a hard time finding eggs from the US. I mostly see sellers from Asia, but I'm hesitant because I'd hate to wait all that time just to receive unviable eggs. Does anyone have a North American supplier they can put me in touch with? Any info is much appreciated! I plan to post updates on the whole process, so we'll see how this turns out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
745 Posts
I would say go for the Gardneri, they're nearly as beautiful as mine Fp. sjoestedti ;-) It's not really that hard, I started feeding fry with frozen food only sometimes I give them live food. I like to keep temp pretty low (now around 22 Celsius, but started with 20). This way they're growing slower, but it's safe (I mean they can get to the maximum size). With higher temp they're growing faster and you should feed them 5-6 times a day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
Seconded on the AKA . Go on their website and see if there are any affiliate clubs in your area . These groups usually have auctions where eggs , fish , and other stuff are available . Plus knowledgable folks . Gardneri , striatum , bivitattum would be my picks from your list for starter fish .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,329 Posts
I've never kept annuals (only Aphyosemion), but if there's only one piece advice I could impart on you it is to cover your tank. Not even a 1/8" opening will do.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jer92

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I really appreciate the responses guys! Nel, thats good to know. I didn't know temp affected feeding frequency as well as growth. When you say higher temps are you talking 24/25 C?
And Jrill and someoldguy I was on the AKA website, they have great atricles! I saw you had to pay the annual fee ($30) just to see the info, I thought that was suspicious. As far local clubs go the nearst is in LA about 3 hours away:crying:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
745 Posts
I really appreciate the responses guys! Nel, thats good to know. I didn't know temp affected feeding frequency as well as growth. When you say higher temps are you talking 24/25 C?
Exactly 24/25 C, with higher temp you can grow them nicely in shorter time, but you have to feed MUCH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've never kept annuals (only Aphyosemion), but if there's only one piece advice I could impart on you it is to cover your tank. Not even a 1/8" opening will do.
Wow good to know, my 10 needs a better lid! Does this include gaps in front of a HOB filter?

:
Exactly 24/25 C, with higher temp you can grow them nicely in shorter time, but you have to feed MUCH.
Thanks for the info. Sounds like lower temps would have more room for error?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
I understand your fascination with killies. I, too, was first attracted to these fish from photos of annuals. I have now kept these fish for several decades.

As mentioned by the OPs, the AKA is the ultimate information and networking resource for killies in the USA. You might be surprised to learn of breeders near you, even though the nearest affiliate club is hours away. A membership will not only give you access articles, but the contact information for members nationwide and monthly fish and egg sales listings.

Another resource is local aquarium clubs. Even if those members don't raise killies, they probably know someone who does.

If you must purchase eggs online, please locate a seller in the USA. Try AquaBid and make sure to read the seller reviews. Also, consider young pairs or juveniles if eggs aren't available for the non-annual fish that interest you.

All the species you have listed present the same challenges to raise from eggs: live food and clean water. If you have experience reliably hatching baby brine shrimp (or culturing various worm species) and raising egg layer fry in small aquaria/containers, you should be prepared to succeed with killies. If you lack either of these skills, success could be more elusive.

Best of luck in your new adventure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Thanks for explaining those options spdskr, I have a place to start now. I'm not going to lie, it was very tempting to buy from the sellers overseas especially when I first got excited about this little endeavor. However I resisted the urge. I'd hate to botch my first attempt just because I rushed it.
The Annuals are truly awe inspiring fish. I haven't completely written them off yet. The idea of fish springing from a bag of peat is amazing to me and reminds me of why I started keeping fish. Its because the underwater world is fascinating
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top