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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These three species have really taken my interest (practically Epiplatys annulatus)
Epiplatys annulatus
Rivulus xiphidius
Aphyosemion austral
And while I do want to use these three species as part of community setups (annulatus and austral for and African nano and xiphidius or south American) I also want to keep these in breeding setups and try to breed them. I’ve read mixed things on these species. Some places say you got to take the eggs out (use a spawn mop) leave on some moss in a bag for about 2 weeks then put into water to hatch them out. Others say just transfer to another tank. Some say you can keep young with parents others say separate. What do people find best to get the healthiest young NOT the highest yield. I’d sell if I get too many (got several places in the area that would buy them off me) but the main reasons for breeding is A. for fun (cause its awesome XD) and B. I can replace any of my fish that die in the communities :) and so I only want healthy young not the most amount of young :)
Also they best in pairs? Trios? Or groups? I was thinking of having 3 tanks (one for each species) and if needed to be in pairs/trios then divide the tank up (like you do for male bettas) and maybe have a small section for young fry before being moved to another tank once they are around juvi size. Or if better kept as a group then just have a baby net/fry holder until they go to a larger tank once juvi.
How does that sound? Thanks :)
 

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You need to do some research, but a couple of pointers to get you started:

1- Killies in community tanks are a dicey proposition. They are very deliberate feeders and have not evolved to compete with an aquarium full of fish. I would recommend you get the hang of keeping and breeding them first. Then when you have young fish to spare, you can try experimenting with adding them to community tanks.

2- All of the breeding methods you mentioned can work. Getting killifish to lay eggs is the easy part. Hatching the eggs, getting the fry through the first few weeks, keeping them segregated by size, and balancing water volume with food density are where the challenge and learning curves lie.

I would recommend the Annulatus if you want to try a species that may allow you to raise the fry with the parents, and the Australe to learn about spawning with mops. Both are fairly good beginner species. The Rivulus can be a bit more of a challenge to breed.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the help :) yeah more research is def needed :3

When I used to keep fish I did breed some small species (rummy nose, cardinals, harlequin rasboras, daisy's ricefish rams, corys, flat head minnows and both 3 and 9 spine stickle backs as well as a mix of small danio species) so nothing too challenging but got a bit of exp. I'd imagine once the eggs have hatched and starting to feed the feeding would be similar to other small fish fry, like tetras, would you say this is the case?

The communities I'm thinking of adding them are: (the * are fish I'd def planning on putting in ones without are ones i'm thinking about but not 100% sure :) )
African tank:
Plataplochilus ngaensis
*Poropanchax normani
Procatopus similis
*Ladigesia roloffi
Barbus hulstaerti
*Aphyosemion austral
*Epiplatys annulatus
Nannocharax fasciatus
*Hymenochirus boettgeri


The other (which xiphidius would go in) is a more pencil fish based tank:
*Copella arnoldi
Corydoras hastatus
*Corydoras pygmaeus
*Corydoras panda
*Otocinclus sp
*Rivulus xiphidius
*pencil fish sp (deciding between Nannostomus eques, marginatus, mortenthaleri, beckfordi, trifasciatus. Def Eques for the swimming behaviour :3 )
Not too sure but maybe also
Paracheirodon simulans
Axelrodia riesei

So the setups shouldn't be too competitive or active either :) + planning both of these setups to be mostly densely planted so will have tons of cover :)
Thoughts? cheers :)
 

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Epiplatys annulatus and Aphyosemion australe reportedly do well in communities. I asked a seller of R. xiphidus whether they would also do well in communities, and he said no...he also stated that they need soft, acidic water but that once this is provided, they are not nearly as difficult as often reported
 

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When I used to keep fish I did breed some small species (rummy nose, cardinals, harlequin rasboras, daisy's ricefish rams, corys, flat head minnows and both 3 and 9 spine stickle backs as well as a mix of small danio species) so nothing too challenging but got a bit of exp. I'd imagine once the eggs have hatched and starting to feed the feeding would be similar to other small fish fry, like tetras, would you say this is the case?
It is similar to an extent. The main difference being that the fry of most killifish species tend to be more aggressive with one another and intolerant of crowding. Larger fry are very predatory towards younger ones, and since the males usually grow faster, some species need to be continually separated by size. This is all part of the reason that you don't see tankfuls of them for sale at the local chain pet store. It requires more labor and more water volume per fish than you would have seen previously.

Re: the community, you will understand what I mean better when you keep some. Killifish will stop and hover like a hummingbird when they are thinking about something. They tend to study their food for a while before eating. It can be very challenging to keep them fed properly in a community setting. They also tend to either become bullies or be victims more than is common with other fish. It can work in the right situation, but you need to be all over it for a while and have a spare tank ready if it doesn't pan out...

If you are interested in going down the Killifish rabbit hole a bit more, you can join the BKA (British Killifish Association) which will give you access to a library of good info and available fish in the UK. I am a member of both the BKA and the AKA. The digital only BKA membership is 10 euro per year...
 

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Thanks for the help :)

So the setups shouldn't be too competitive or active either :) + planning both of these setups to be mostly densely planted so will have tons of cover :)
Thoughts? cheers :)
Killies in community tanks are problematic for the reasons already mentioned. While a varied group, these fish have evolved to exploit what are often considered marginal habitats: stagnant water; shallow, slow moving streams; ephemeral pools; and weedy margins of larger bodies of water. Killies are rarely found in typical "community fish" environments, and are easily out-competed in these scenarios.

I 100% agree that you should start by dedicating one or more small tanks to housing and raising the species you desire, and then placing the excess young in one of your community tanks.

Best of luck!
 

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If you ever want to try an easy species for beginners Least Killi are a cinch to breed as they are livebearers. Like your other species though, they do best in species tanks. I have also found killi fish to be extremely aggressive, even when they are small. Other species i've had success with are striped panchax. I had a breeding pair in a 30 gal tank with moss, pea gravel and a 3" mat of watersprite at the surface. Unfortunately, while I managed to raise the fry, mom and dad ate the juvis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the info guys :) didn't know about the males growing faster so that will be something to keep in mind :)

Yeah didn't know on the whole taking their time to feed. So kinda like my old Tire track eel. He'd come over watch the food for some minuets before eventually taking it :p

See the only killifish I've kept was Lampeyes (A. normani) which always fed well for me.
Yeah I'll start with breeding groups then try out the young in the setups :)

Least Killis don't really do it for me. Maybe at a later date... ;)
 

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Many killifish are unexpectedly aggressive, as I learned when I tried to keep my Aphyosemion striatum trio in a 29 community...end result; every other fish in the tank (except 2 platies, oddly) had its fins torn to shreds within 2 weeks.

Other note; least killifish, or Heterandria formosa, are actually livebearers related to guppies and platies...don't know why they are called killifish. I will agree that they are idiot proof, though.
 

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Killies are a pretty diverse group. I think its a mistake to generalize like the above posters. They come in different shapes, colors, sizes and temperaments. Research the ones you like and see if they will work in your setup.
 

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Sorry if it sounds like I'm generalizing...there are good community killies (most Epiplatys, for instance). Just meant to be giving a warning that not all killifish play nice in communities.
 
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