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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
I am completely new to keeping shrimp (and this website); all of my aquarium experience is with a single beta, who my family managed to keep alive for 3 years before he developed some kind of malignant tumor and eventually died. I now have a marimo ball from that beta's tank, which has lived in an old jam jar with infrequent water changes for several years and is covered in algae. I found some "sea monkey" kits in my basement and had the idea of starting a planted brine shrimp tank in a 5 gallon tank, but can't find any information on keeping brine shrimp for non-feeder purposes beyond the "EcoSphere" (which I don't think is a viable method since the shrimp population dies out after about 5 years, when it should continue to reproduce) and long-term feeder populations in unplanted tanks.
Does anyone have any ideas/tips for keeping a planted tank of just brine shrimp? I'm open to putting other invertebrates in if it would improve the system's health. This setup is also going to be in a student-geared 3-person apartment, so I can't get a huge setup; a phytoplankton culture like Phytoplankton Culture Kit - Nannochloropsis would be feasible if live food beyond what would grow on the plants is necessary.
 

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I've hatched out brine shrimp for feeding to marine fish (trying to get WC dragonettes feeding). Never had any luck raising them to size. The macroalgae you'd have in such a setup is easy to grow, thought.

I had best hatching results with decapsulated eggs.
 

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Fairy Shrimp or Triops may be better options for a planted setup, as they're freshwater and have longer lifecycles.

All of them will do best in setups with substrate that is removed and dried after each lifecycle. That's what it will take for their eggs to dry and be useful for hatching. I like to use a layer of leaf litter mixed with a tiny bit of peat. Though, I don't ever keep them in fully planted tanks - just tanks with some moss and floating plants.

Once you try Fairy Shrimp and Triops, you'll likely graduate to Neocaridina shrimp because their lifecycles take place entirely in freshwater and they can live 2+ years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Fairy Shrimp or Triops may be better options for a planted setup, as they're freshwater and have longer lifecycles.

All of them will do best in setups with substrate that is removed and dried after each lifecycle. That's what it will take for their eggs to dry and be useful for hatching. I like to use a layer of leaf litter mixed with a tiny bit of peat. Though, I don't ever keep them in fully planted tanks - just tanks with some moss and floating plants.

Once you try Fairy Shrimp and Triops, you'll likely graduate to Neocaridina shrimp because their lifecycles take place entirely in freshwater and they can live 2+ years.
Funny you should recommend triops, because a second look at the kits has corrected my memory-- they're triops! Would it be possible to manually remove eggs without drying the tank, or do triops bury their eggs?
 

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Funny you should recommend triops, because a second look at the kits has corrected my memory-- they're triops! Would it be possible to manually remove eggs without drying the tank, or do triops bury their eggs?
It's hit-or-miss on how they behave, as they do love to burrow, but you'll likely be able to remove the eggs if you check the tank every day. And I mean every day - because they'll also eat eggs. Even if you can't collect the eggs easily, you can just hatch more.

They're really cool little bugs and are way more interesting than brine shrimp. So neat that I can't remember a year that I haven't hatched some out. My bunch has been going and laying eggs since sometime in the 90s.

Note that a lot of people say they eat plants. They do. But not at any rate where you're gonna notice it. So don't let that deter you at all. I like to use a bunch of leaf litter and moss to give them plenty of hiding places. Unlike dwarf freshwater shrimp, they're cannibals and will eat each other if given the opportunity.

Hope you'll consider starting a tank journal to track your progress and share with others.
 

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To be honest I would just so straight to a shrimp tank. Neocaridina davidi are quite easy to take care of as long as you can perform very basic maintenance, and IMO they are much more interesting to watch and very easy to breed.
Feel free to reply if you have any questions about shrimp tanks :)
 
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