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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I managed to get some Water spangles (Salvinia Minima) with an order of micro sword.

My question is, are there any good reason to have floating plants in a tank?

They just seem to get knocked down by my filter and caught up in the other plants. Then when they float they seem to block the light from getting to my micro sword.

I'm thinking of getting rid of them, if there are any reasons not to let me know.

Thanks,
 

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personal preference. I liked them for a while but they grew way too dense (light blocking) and way too fast. I also didn't like the fact that they get dunked and caught on plants like you said. So I basically replaced them with frogbit.
 

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The only reason I keep floaters, and the floater I keep is Frogbit, is that it helps fight algae in the sense that they absorb excess nutrients. If you do decide to get rid of them, dispose of the in a garbage can, and not down the drain or toilet as they are invasive.
 
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My personal opinion: Floaters should be in almost every tank. They just need to be controlled. I make a floating corral out of 1/4 inch ridgid tubing. I make a small section of the aquarium that is shaded by the floaters. I usually put a submerged feature under them that does not require light(wood, rock), The corral is subtle and keeps things in shape. No algae in the tank and a cool underside view of the roots. Fish love this shady spot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a tank at home that the nitrates are getting too high. would floater plants absorb nitrates?
 

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I'm thinking about trying these above a large pieces of driftwood, which obviously doesn't require light. What's the best way to get them to stay in place?
 

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The only reason I keep floaters, and the floater I keep is Frogbit, is that it helps fight algae in the sense that they absorb excess nutrients. If you do decide to get rid of them, dispose of the in a garbage can, and not down the drain or toilet as they are invasive.
That is excellent advice. Have you ever used them as fertilizer in your garden? I'm considering doing that rather than throwing excess in my trashcan but not sure if is helpful to my outdoor plants.
 

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That is excellent advice. Have you ever used them as fertilizer in your garden? I'm considering doing that rather than throwing excess in my trashcan but not sure if is helpful to my outdoor plants.
It'd be like throwing any other plant into your compost. Just make sure that they are dead before throwing them into your garden since a large rain can push the plants towards local streams and ponds which can cause issues for local wildlife. Alternatively you could dry them out and make fish food from them as well or feed them directly to fish that like to eat plants like goldfish.
 

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If you're raising tiny egg-layer fish fry the best infusoria media can be made from either dried/dead duckweed or salvinia as they often times have the cysts for microorganisms already present.
 
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