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Which kit?

  • JC&P

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been a long while since I have posted on the forum but I recently set up an 8g tank and have decided to make a move to the dark side of high tech and have been looking at pressurized co2 systems. Really like GLAs kit for around $200 including the cylinder I believe. Naturally I got a targeted ad on instagram for a co2 kit from JC&P aquariums. It’s the full kit minus the cylinder on sale for $80.

Ive Only read good things about GLA equipment. The JC&P looks alright. Definitely not as nice and their graphics are kinda cheesy but whatever. Just wondering if the difference is worth the price. I like that the GLA comes with the tank but is it really worth it? I’m moving in less than a year and just thinking it might be fine just to rent a tank where I’ll get refills at airgas anyway so it’s one less thing to pack. Tanks are also only like $60. So I could buy one for the JC&P kit and it would still be cheaper than the GLA.

I’ll attach links below. Also wondering if anyone off hand knows how much a 5lb tank is to rent w refills from airgas is since their prices aren’t on their website and I’m sure they’re closed today. THANKS


 

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The answer to the question is secret option number 3, neither of them.

These are both extreme budget regulators that lack a 2nd stage which saves your fish from end of tank gas release (basically when the tank runs low all the co2 will rush out of the valve rapidly and gas your fish to death). For not much more you can buy a 2 stage regulator. Cheapest good option is the co2art regulator. Other cheap option is the diy route where you buy a used 2 stage regulator from some place like e bay and the parts needed to hook it up to co2 and needle valves etc and screw it together yourself.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The answer to the question is secret option number 3, neither of them.

These are both extreme budget regulators that lack a 2nd stage which saves your fish from end of tank gas release (basically when the tank runs low all the co2 will rush out of the valve rapidly and gas your fish to death). For not much more you can buy a 2 stage regulator. Cheapest good option is the co2art regulator. Other cheap option is the diy route where you buy a used 2 stage regulator from some place like e bay and the parts needed to hook it up to co2 and needle valves etc and screw it together yourself.

Good luck!

So you’re really saying neither of these are worth buying? I ran a stupid cheap co2 setup by Ista and never had this “end of tank release” issue. Maybe that was because it wasn’t high pressure? I find it convenient that the one you recommended is a sponsor of the site 😜. I’ll look into them.
 

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So you’re really saying neither of these are worth buying? I ran a stupid cheap co2 setup by Ista and never had this “end of tank release” issue. Maybe that was because it wasn’t high pressure? I find it convenient that the one you recommended is a sponsor of the site 😜. I’ll look into them.
It's not really convenient to me at all. I am just a user here. I don't really care who is a sponsor. I don't even know what it means to be a sponsor.

For what it's worth, I have two regulators and both of them are diy. That is so clearly the best option but most people don't want to screw a few parts together. /shrug

Good luck with your tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's not really convenient to me at all. I am just a user here. I don't really care who is a sponsor. I don't even know what it means to be a sponsor.

For what it's worth, I have two regulators and both of them are diy. That is so clearly the best option but most people don't want to screw a few parts together. /shrug

Good luck with your tank.
I think GLA is a sponsor too anyway lmao. Sounds like you’ve got a good regiment down for your diy. Ive seen nice co2 generators on Amazon but I feel like it’s not that much more just to do pressurized. Thanks for the insight!
 

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I think GLA is a sponsor too anyway lmao. Sounds like you’ve got a good regiment down for your diy. Ive seen nice co2 generators on Amazon but I feel like it’s not that much more just to do pressurized. Thanks for the insight!
When I am referring to a diy regulator I am not talking about diy co2 to be clear. A diy regulator is a regulator sold originally for another purpose like welding or oxygen etc. Then add parts to make it useful for aquariums like a needle valve and solenoid etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's not really convenient to me at all. I am just a user here. I don't really care who is a sponsor. I don't even know what it means to be a sponsor.

For what it's worth, I have two regulators and both of them are diy. That is so clearly the best option but most people don't want to screw a few parts together. /shrug

Good luck with your tank.
What about these two:


 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When I am referring to a diy regulator I am not talking about diy co2 to be clear. A diy regulator is a regulator sold originally for another purpose like welding or oxygen etc. Then add parts to make it useful for aquariums like a needle valve and solenoid etc.

What makes it better? Do you have a parts list to build one then? I’d be interested in that if it warrants the cost

When I am referring to a diy regulator I am not talking about diy co2 to be clear. A diy regulator is a regulator sold originally for another purpose like welding or oxygen etc. Then add parts to make it useful for aquariums like a needle valve and solenoid etc.
How relevant are the parts in this thread/the post overall

 

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What about these two:


The co2art one comes with a bunch of stuff you might not actually need. So unless you are sure you want all that extra stuff, I'd just buy the regulator from them if you want an out of the box regulator.

The other one you link is a single stage regulator which I would not recommend. They sell a dual stage, but its pretty expensive. Also they are selling the cylinder which may or may not be something you want. I recommend people find out where they are going to fill their cyliner first before buying one because some places only do swaps. Meaning you show up with your bright and shiny co2 tank and they hand you one beat to heck and they keep your bright and shiny one. In those situations its better to buy a tank directly from the filler, especially since it means you won't be paying for shipping.

What makes it better? Do you have a parts list to build one then? I’d be interested in that if it warrants the cost
They are better because 1) the actual regulators tend to be built like tanks since they are designed to be used repeatedly for decades doing things like welding, and 2) the parts you add on are as good or bad of quality as you want them to be. So you can make them REALLY nice if you want. Plus assuming you get some decent deals, they are cheaper. So in other words, better quality and potentially cheaper price.

One of my regulators I bought the post body parts as a kit from diyco2regulators.com. It works pretty good but it's honestly not as nice as the other regulator which I bought from a forum member selling all the parts as a kit. Goes by the name of Bettatail. He has not been active super recently, but if you are in the market you can search his name and send him a private message. You will see some of his older sales posts to get an idea of costs. This way will likely be more expensive then just buying a co2art regulator by itself.

How relevant are the parts in this thread/the post overall

This thread lists what you need by at least some of the name brands selling the parts. There are many more name brands out there. If you just bought what was on this post you would end up with a very nice regulator.



You will also want to decide how you are going to inject the co2 into the tank. For small tanks a diffuser is the easiest thing. But for medium and large tanks you should seriously consider a reactor. These can be built or purchased though they are more commonly built since they are easy to build and few people actually sell good ones.
 

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Being a sponsor simply means, as a company, we are allowed to interact with this great community. To prevent this site from being overrun by sales posts and random links, the admin team approves only companies that they trust to contribute to the conversation in a positive manner.

CO2 ART regulators are designed to be used by hobbyists and professionals alike. For this reason, we offer complete kits along with the option to purchase each item individually. Both our regulators come with a bubble counter and a solenoid and power supply, nothing else is added. The complete kit option includes a drop checker and a choice of diffuser. There are other options and items available within the hobby but we choose to only include the essentials for setting up a system and monitoring the level of CO2 in the aquarium.

Both our regulators come with full five years warranty and a lifetime of support from our 24/7 team.

We sell each item individually on our website and our support team has the ability to send out any replacement parts if required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The co2art one comes with a bunch of stuff you might not actually need. So unless you are sure you want all that extra stuff, I'd just buy the regulator from them if you want an out of the box regulator.

The other one you link is a single stage regulator which I would not recommend. They sell a dual stage, but its pretty expensive. Also they are selling the cylinder which may or may not be something you want. I recommend people find out where they are going to fill their cyliner first before buying one because some places only do swaps. Meaning you show up with your bright and shiny co2 tank and they hand you one beat to heck and they keep your bright and shiny one. In those situations its better to buy a tank directly from the filler, especially since it means you won't be paying for shipping.



They are better because 1) the actual regulators tend to be built like tanks since they are designed to be used repeatedly for decades doing things like welding, and 2) the parts you add on are as good or bad of quality as you want them to be. So you can make them REALLY nice if you want. Plus assuming you get some decent deals, they are cheaper. So in other words, better quality and potentially cheaper price.

One of my regulators I bought the post body parts as a kit from diyco2regulators.com. It works pretty good but it's honestly not as nice as the other regulator which I bought from a forum member selling all the parts as a kit. Goes by the name of Bettatail. He has not been active super recently, but if you are in the market you can search his name and send him a private message. You will see some of his older sales posts to get an idea of costs. This way will likely be more expensive then just buying a co2art regulator by itself.



This thread lists what you need by at least some of the name brands selling the parts. There are many more name brands out there. If you just bought what was on this post you would end up with a very nice regulator.



You will also want to decide how you are going to inject the co2 into the tank. For small tanks a diffuser is the easiest thing. But for medium and large tanks you should seriously consider a reactor. These can be built or purchased though they are more commonly built since they are easy to build and few people actually sell good ones.
Much thanks for all of your thorough responses! Reminding me after all these years why this forum is the best!

I’ll probably only be getting the regulator, u bend, drop checker, and tubing from CO2 art. Will use this as a starting point to develop my preferences and further my knowledge and may move into the diy regulator realm further down the line. I’ll make sure to bookmark that thread and try and get in touch with bettatail.

Being a sponsor simply means, as a company, we are allowed to interact with this great community. To prevent this site from being overrun by sales posts and random links, the admin team approves only companies that they trust to contribute to the conversation in a positive manner.

CO2 ART regulators are designed to be used by hobbyists and professionals alike. For this reason, we offer complete kits along with the option to purchase each item individually. Both our regulators come with a bubble counter and a solenoid and power supply, nothing else is added. The complete kit option includes a drop checker and a choice of diffuser. There are other options and items available within the hobby but we choose to only include the essentials for setting up a system and monitoring the level of CO2 in the aquarium.

Both our regulators come with full five years warranty and a lifetime of support from our 24/7 team.

We sell each item individually on our website and our support team has the ability to send out any replacement parts if required.
Thanks for the clarification John! Nice to hear some input from the source. I will likely be going with your product. Can’t wait!
 

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The JC&P will work just fine. I’ve never used them specifically but have used many regulators including CO2Art, GLA, UNS, and Aquatek. I’ve never had an issue with any of my regulators. Honestly most are the exact same thing other than badging or a sticker on them to indicate the brand. Are some built with higher quality materials or better QC? Probably, but you’ll probably never notice after installing it.
 
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