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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Am I the only person in the world who can't grow java moss? Its in my tank that has diy co2, weekly ferts and med lighting, its green and alive, I've had it for months, but it hasn't grown its only attached itself to the slate, I've heard it grows in peoples drains after water changes but not in my tank! I thought it was a super quick grower?
 

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Not a ton of flow, but I can see the moss "flowing"

on the tanks
2 65w CFL 6500k bulbs
1 t5ho 6500k bulb
1 finnex fugeray r slim

the rest of my plats grow great, my taiwan moss covered a SS sheet fairly quickly. Java moss, just turned brown and fell apart. I tried moss twice from two different people with the same result. The areas I have them, don't get a ton of direct light, partly shaded with flow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Don't know the exact parameters I can get them tomorrow, but I know my water is hard but the co2 has lowered the ph and its 26/27c, I'm dosing tropicas plant ferts, but like italion said all the other plants are growing, just not the moss
 

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I'm as miffed as you both are. But I did find this on the fish lore forum.

"Allelopathy describes the production of chemicals by an organism that adversely affect another organism and/or advantageously affect itself. In the case of plants, these chemicals (called allelochemicals) are often readily produced to inhibit the growth of other plants or alage, or to prevent animals from eating the plants. Plants depend heavily on allelochemicals because they are unable to defend themselves in a movile way (e.e. they cannot run, move or fight in the traditional sense). In nature, although these chemicals may be produced in abundance, they are often diluted in effect where a single plant is concerned. Only when a particular species is grouped over a wide area can a noticeable effect be seen. However, in the enclosed environment of the aquarium, allelochemicals can quickly build up, with various effects on some plant species. For example, it is not unusual for an aquariust to have problems keeping certain species of plant, even though the lighting, temperature & water quality are at ideal levels, & there is an abundant supply of nutrients. Often. the reason for this common occurrence is that another plant in the aquarim is producing particular allelochemicals that inhibit or prevent the growth of the 'problem' plant. The allelochemicals produced by some aquatic plants have a particularly adverse effect on floating plant species and algae. This is one of the main reasons why a well-planted aquarium may not show signs of algae blooms, despite high nutrient levels & strong lighting. Although some information is available relating to specific plants and the allelochemicals they produce, little is known about the process of allelopathy, so it is impossible to produce a list of compatible plant species. In most cases, it is a combination of chemicals, rather than a single allelochemical, that has an adverse effect on plant species. In any case, it is worth being aware of the process when keeping aquatic plants, because it can sometimes explin an inability to keep one species of plant while others thrive".
 

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My thoughts are not expert ones, but I think mosses like cooler temperatures. I had a hard time with java moss too, for a long time. I too would wonder why it wouldn't thrive for me as I thought it was an easy plant. It would be dark green, but stringy, not branching or appearing to put on healthy growth. I had it in different tanks, trying to find a balance. And it would grow lots of hair algae.

Finally I pulled it out, and selected the best looking strands with a little branching, and pulled off the visible hair algae. I ended up putting them in a glass jar of water on a windowsill, but out of direct sunlight (I used a curtain behind it when full sun was on that window.). It did better. Finally I put it into a new shrimp tank, where the heater is turned to the lowest possible setting (water is around 70 degrees). I'd venture to say the moss is now doing better than ever. It's tied to a ceramic ornament, and it's growing, branching, and looking healthy. I can't say exactly what has made the difference. However, in your case, Itallionstallion, since your tank is quite warm, if I were you I would try growing a little bit of moss in a jar or fishbowl and see if that makes any difference. Change out the water in the jar from time to time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Its strange because I have plants like crypts, crispus and rotalla all growing/ duplicating like wildfire, just no movement on the java moss, if anything I would say it looks worse everyday, brown patches and dark green instead of light green, but yeah I'm about 26-27c so maybe its too hot.
 
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